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Solar ... In the news

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  • Coastalwatch
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    Good news perhaps for anyone still to take the plunge with at least some base figures to discuss questionable quotations upon!

    China solar cell prices hit record lows

    Solar cell prices in China fell to their lowest values ever according to OPIS data. Mono M10 and Mono G12 cells both dipped more than 3% to $0.0865/W and $0.0856/W respectively, while TOPCon M10 cells notched 0.41% downwards to $0.0965/W.



    East coast, lat 51.97. 8.26kw SSE, 23° pitch + 0.59kw WSW vertical. Nissan Leaf plus Zappi charger and 2 x ASHP's. Givenergy 8.2 & 9.5 kWh batts, 2 x 3 kW ac inverters. Indra V2H . CoCharger Host, Interest in Ripple Energy & Abundance.
  • Martyn1981
    Martyn1981 Posts: 14,873 Forumite
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    Another big PV farm, following the 740MW scheme in Nottinghamshire I mentioned a month ago.

    JBM Solar unveils plans for 320MW UK solar

    JBM Solar has launched a consultation for a 320MW solar project in Yorkshire, in the UK.

    JBM Solar (RWE Group) is proposing to locate Peartree Hill Solar Farm to the east of Beverley in East Riding, Yorkshire.

    The initial consultation period runs from 9 October until 6 November 2023.

    Peartree Hill is made up of several areas of land, connected by a series of underground cables.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW). Two A2A units for cleaner heating. Two BEV's.

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • Coastalwatch
    Coastalwatch Posts: 3,233 Forumite
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    Unlike battery storage and wind turbines it would appear for PV panels at least that supply is outstripping demand if the feature below is anything to go by. A shame to learn of panels being stored in warehouses rather than adorning the rooftops of domestic properties and commercial premises. :'(

    European warehouses now storing more than 80 GW of unsold solar panels

    Analyst Marius Mordal Bakke explained that PERC modules bought and stored by a European distributor for $0.23/W in March are now facing an average spot price of $0.16/W today, which could very likely be $0.15/W next month.



    East coast, lat 51.97. 8.26kw SSE, 23° pitch + 0.59kw WSW vertical. Nissan Leaf plus Zappi charger and 2 x ASHP's. Givenergy 8.2 & 9.5 kWh batts, 2 x 3 kW ac inverters. Indra V2H . CoCharger Host, Interest in Ripple Energy & Abundance.
  • Coastalwatch
    Coastalwatch Posts: 3,233 Forumite
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    On a brighter note. It seems other nations are taking a more positive stance regarding PV energy generation in combination with farming practices than we do here in the UK.

    Luxembourg allocates 52.7 MW in agrivoltaic tender

    The Ministry of Energy of Luxembourg has allocated 52.7 MW of PV capacity across 14 projects in the country's first tender for agrivoltaic projects. The tender was originally supposed to allocate 50 MW. The selected projects will spread across the country and will occupy a total surface of 73.5 hectares.

    The Ministry of Energy noted significant diversity in the use of agricultural land for solar projects. They have designated such facilities for deployment on meadows used for fodder or grass production, pastures accommodating cattle, sheep, chickens, and Iberian pigs, as well as arable land with crop rotation and an orchard hosting laying hens.


    https://www.pv-magazine.com/2023/10/05/luxembourg-allocates-52-7-mw-in-agrivoltaic-tender/



    East coast, lat 51.97. 8.26kw SSE, 23° pitch + 0.59kw WSW vertical. Nissan Leaf plus Zappi charger and 2 x ASHP's. Givenergy 8.2 & 9.5 kWh batts, 2 x 3 kW ac inverters. Indra V2H . CoCharger Host, Interest in Ripple Energy & Abundance.
  • Coastalwatch
    Coastalwatch Posts: 3,233 Forumite
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    Unlike battery storage and wind turbines it would appear for PV panels at least that supply is outstripping demand if the feature below is anything to go by. A shame to learn of panels being stored in warehouses rather than adorning the rooftops of domestic properties and commercial premises. :'(

    European warehouses now storing more than 80 GW of unsold solar panels

    Analyst Marius Mordal Bakke explained that PERC modules bought and stored by a European distributor for $0.23/W in March are now facing an average spot price of $0.16/W today, which could very likely be $0.15/W next month.



    Having posted the above a couple of weeks ago I came across the post below offering further insight into the figures. It would seem the 80 GW's are not simply stored in warehouses but other areas too, including in transit from China.
    While prices have been reducing through the year with further on the way it would appear the above headline could have been a little misleading. 

    Europe may go back to ‘normal’ inventory levels by June 2024

    Norwegian consultancy Rystad's recent data indicates around 80 GW of unsold PV panels in European warehouses, raising concerns of a growing solar module glut. These figures have sparked reactions, with some doubting their accuracy, given Rystad's previous estimate of 40 GW in mid-July.
    “Rystad probably worked on different substocks or categories. For example, if modules are sold from Chinese manufacturer to their European subsidiary, or a distributor, under Cost, Insurance and Freight (CIF) incoterms, then they are formally exported the moment they are loaded on the ship. This is why they may appear that as European “stocked“ modules, even though they are still at sea and haven’t reached Europe yet. It takes roughly six weeks for these panels to come to Europe. So, if you assume that the Chinese are exporting 8 GW to 10 GW per month, that would mean that there would be about 10 GW to 15 GW worth of stock at sea, not in warehouses.”


    East coast, lat 51.97. 8.26kw SSE, 23° pitch + 0.59kw WSW vertical. Nissan Leaf plus Zappi charger and 2 x ASHP's. Givenergy 8.2 & 9.5 kWh batts, 2 x 3 kW ac inverters. Indra V2H . CoCharger Host, Interest in Ripple Energy & Abundance.
  • Martyn1981
    Martyn1981 Posts: 14,873 Forumite
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    edited 30 October 2023 at 2:30PM
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    Article talking about a study that was looking for the solar tipping point, and found it had already been reached - effectively unstoppable, as it gets better/cheaper.

    The chart shows just how much the World is expected to lean into solar. But I assume for nations like the UK (or even less sunny) wind may be the main source of RE generation.

    Irreversible Solar Tipping Point Has Already Occurred, Researchers Claim



    Researchers in Europe published a new study in the journal Nature Communications on October 17, 2023, that comes to a rather extraordinary conclusion. They found, much to their surprise, the solar power tipping point is not still in the future. In fact, it has already occurred. The upshot of their findings is that the move to solar power is now irreversible.

    The researchers are from a diverse group of institutions including the Global Systems Institute at the University of Exeter, the Center for Energy, Environment and Natural Resource Governance at the University of Cambridge, the World Bank, the Institute for Sustainable Resources at University College London, the Climate Action Center at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Cambridge Econometrics in Cambridge, UK.

    Stripped of its technical jargon, the report suggests that prior studies of future energy generation over-emphasized the role of fossil fuels and under-emphasized the role of renewables, particularly solar. “Without any further energy policy changes, solar energy appears to follow a robust trajectory to become the future dominant power source before mid-century,” the researchers said.

    “Due to the reinforcing co-evolution of technology costs and deployment, our analysis establishes quantitative empirical evidence, from current and historical data trends, that a solar energy tipping point is likely to have passed (emphasis added). Once the combined cost of solar and storage crosses cost parity with all alternative technologies in several key markets, its widespread deployment and further costs declines globally could become irreversible. This echoes the results from Rupert Way et al., who showed that such a configuration would be cheaper than alternatives.

    “Historical policy to stimulate solar PV has brought down costs. We’re now at the point that a virtuous cycle between cost declines and additional deployment doesn’t require more ambitious policies targeting solar anymore,” lead author Femke Nijsse of the University of Exeter told Anthropocene. “More ambitious policies for other renewables [are] still needed.”

    Over the last decade and a half, the cost of solar panels and wind power have plummeted. Researchers had begun to talk about a ‘tipping point’ where renewables might out-compete fossil fuel sources of energy based on cost alone, but there was little agreement on when or how this might occur. As a result, models of the global energy system have generally assumed that fossil fuel dominance would continue. Past models have also consistently underestimated how fast solar power would grow in the real world.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW). Two A2A units for cleaner heating. Two BEV's.

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • Heedtheadvice
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    Not really solar directly...and maybe already posted somewhere?

    New(ish) type of batteries gaining installation momentum. Not based on Lithium but Vanadium.

    Needs large scale installations so not for the domestic  home market but good for commercial installations. A lot more expensive than Lithium based battery but have a much longer life.

    .....so reported the press at the weekend. Already several large commercial sales.
  • EricMears
    EricMears Posts: 3,255 Forumite
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    "prior studies of future energy generation over-emphasized the role of fossil fuels and under-emphasized the role of renewables"

    Quelle suprise !  I wonder how many of the 'prior studies' had been sponsored by interested parties ?
    NE Derbyshire.4kWp S Facing 17.5deg slope (dormer roof).24kWh of Pylontech batteries with Lux controller BEV : Hyundai Ioniq5
  • JKenH
    JKenH Posts: 4,899 Forumite
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    Article talking about a study that was looking for the solar tipping point, and found it had already been reached - effectively unstoppable, as it gets better/cheaper.

    The chart shows just how much the World is expected to lean into solar. But I assume for nations like the UK (or even less sunny) wind may be the main source of RE generation.

    Irreversible Solar Tipping Point Has Already Occurred, Researchers Claim



    Researchers in Europe published a new study in the journal Nature Communications on October 17, 2023, that comes to a rather extraordinary conclusion. They found, much to their surprise, the solar power tipping point is not still in the future. In fact, it has already occurred. The upshot of their findings is that the move to solar power is now irreversible.

    The researchers are from a diverse group of institutions including the Global Systems Institute at the University of Exeter, the Center for Energy, Environment and Natural Resource Governance at the University of Cambridge, the World Bank, the Institute for Sustainable Resources at University College London, the Climate Action Center at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Cambridge Econometrics in Cambridge, UK.

    Stripped of its technical jargon, the report suggests that prior studies of future energy generation over-emphasized the role of fossil fuels and under-emphasized the role of renewables, particularly solar. “Without any further energy policy changes, solar energy appears to follow a robust trajectory to become the future dominant power source before mid-century,” the researchers said.

    “Due to the reinforcing co-evolution of technology costs and deployment, our analysis establishes quantitative empirical evidence, from current and historical data trends, that a solar energy tipping point is likely to have passed (emphasis added). Once the combined cost of solar and storage crosses cost parity with all alternative technologies in several key markets, its widespread deployment and further costs declines globally could become irreversible. This echoes the results from Rupert Way et al., who showed that such a configuration would be cheaper than alternatives.

    “Historical policy to stimulate solar PV has brought down costs. We’re now at the point that a virtuous cycle between cost declines and additional deployment doesn’t require more ambitious policies targeting solar anymore,” lead author Femke Nijsse of the University of Exeter told Anthropocene. “More ambitious policies for other renewables [are] still needed.”

    Over the last decade and a half, the cost of solar panels and wind power have plummeted. Researchers had begun to talk about a ‘tipping point’ where renewables might out-compete fossil fuel sources of energy based on cost alone, but there was little agreement on when or how this might occur. As a result, models of the global energy system have generally assumed that fossil fuel dominance would continue. Past models have also consistently underestimated how fast solar power would grow in the real world.


    The CleanTechnica article doesn’t quote one of the reservations in the study - intermittency and funding the storage required.

    The problem of high cost for renewables has changed into a problem of balancing electricity grids, in which large amounts of intermittent wind and solar generation pose challenges. Batteries play an important role in mitigating that issue and show a similarly high learning rate10. This implies that electricity storage costs and diffusion could follow a comparable and coupled trajectory to PV in the 2020s.

    Whether solar and wind can dominate electricity grids depends on the ability of the technology to overcome a series of barriers. This includes how to deal with the seasonal variation for which batteries are ill-suited11. The cost of managing large amounts of intermittency could offset further cost reductions in solar panels and wind turbines, impeding their rapid diffusion12


    And in the study it is suggested the cost of dealing with the storage to support solar is conveniently moved to the grid and charged to consumers rather than requiring renewables to carry the full burden of storage needs. 

    Specifically, our model suggests that the allocation of storage costs to the grid and charged directly to consumers incentivises more renewables diffusion than requiring renewables to carry the full burden of storage needs (see Fig. 5), leading to lower overall system costs41.

    Northern Lincolnshire. 7.8 kWp system, (4.2 kw west facing panels , 3.6 kw east facing), Solis inverters, Solar IBoost water heater, Mitsubishi SRK35ZS-S and SRK20ZS-S Wall Mounted Inverter Heat Pumps, ex Nissan Leaf owner)
  • michaels
    michaels Posts: 28,221 Forumite
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    JKenH said:
    Article talking about a study that was looking for the solar tipping point, and found it had already been reached - effectively unstoppable, as it gets better/cheaper.

    The chart shows just how much the World is expected to lean into solar. But I assume for nations like the UK (or even less sunny) wind may be the main source of RE generation.

    Irreversible Solar Tipping Point Has Already Occurred, Researchers Claim



    Researchers in Europe published a new study in the journal Nature Communications on October 17, 2023, that comes to a rather extraordinary conclusion. They found, much to their surprise, the solar power tipping point is not still in the future. In fact, it has already occurred. The upshot of their findings is that the move to solar power is now irreversible.

    The researchers are from a diverse group of institutions including the Global Systems Institute at the University of Exeter, the Center for Energy, Environment and Natural Resource Governance at the University of Cambridge, the World Bank, the Institute for Sustainable Resources at University College London, the Climate Action Center at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Cambridge Econometrics in Cambridge, UK.

    Stripped of its technical jargon, the report suggests that prior studies of future energy generation over-emphasized the role of fossil fuels and under-emphasized the role of renewables, particularly solar. “Without any further energy policy changes, solar energy appears to follow a robust trajectory to become the future dominant power source before mid-century,” the researchers said.

    “Due to the reinforcing co-evolution of technology costs and deployment, our analysis establishes quantitative empirical evidence, from current and historical data trends, that a solar energy tipping point is likely to have passed (emphasis added). Once the combined cost of solar and storage crosses cost parity with all alternative technologies in several key markets, its widespread deployment and further costs declines globally could become irreversible. This echoes the results from Rupert Way et al., who showed that such a configuration would be cheaper than alternatives.

    “Historical policy to stimulate solar PV has brought down costs. We’re now at the point that a virtuous cycle between cost declines and additional deployment doesn’t require more ambitious policies targeting solar anymore,” lead author Femke Nijsse of the University of Exeter told Anthropocene. “More ambitious policies for other renewables [are] still needed.”

    Over the last decade and a half, the cost of solar panels and wind power have plummeted. Researchers had begun to talk about a ‘tipping point’ where renewables might out-compete fossil fuel sources of energy based on cost alone, but there was little agreement on when or how this might occur. As a result, models of the global energy system have generally assumed that fossil fuel dominance would continue. Past models have also consistently underestimated how fast solar power would grow in the real world.


    The CleanTechnica article doesn’t quote one of the reservations in the study - intermittency and funding the storage required.

    The problem of high cost for renewables has changed into a problem of balancing electricity grids, in which large amounts of intermittent wind and solar generation pose challenges. Batteries play an important role in mitigating that issue and show a similarly high learning rate10. This implies that electricity storage costs and diffusion could follow a comparable and coupled trajectory to PV in the 2020s.

    Whether solar and wind can dominate electricity grids depends on the ability of the technology to overcome a series of barriers. This includes how to deal with the seasonal variation for which batteries are ill-suited11. The cost of managing large amounts of intermittency could offset further cost reductions in solar panels and wind turbines, impeding their rapid diffusion12


    And in the study it is suggested the cost of dealing with the storage to support solar is conveniently moved to the grid and charged to consumers rather than requiring renewables to carry the full burden of storage needs. 

    Specifically, our model suggests that the allocation of storage costs to the grid and charged directly to consumers incentivises more renewables diffusion than requiring renewables to carry the full burden of storage needs (see Fig. 5), leading to lower overall system costs41.

    Do we expect nuclear to carry the costs of failing to demand follow?
    I think....
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