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Preparedness for when

edited 8 November 2012 at 8:54AM in Old Style MoneySaving
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  • vanoonoovanoonoo Forumite
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    kettlenic wrote: »
    I am not sure I understand why we need to have the bags? natural disaters? car broken down in snow?

    incase you have to evacuate from home or if you are somewhere other than home and cant get home. if theres a gas leak whilst you're out shopping or at home in the middle of the night and youre given 5 mins to get out of the area you would want to be able to grab a bag a go and it would be good to know that the bag contained everything you might need to keep you as comfortable as possible for the next couple of days. that or if the zombies come ... :p
    Blah
  • FruballFruball Forumite
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    Love the other term for the BugOutBag, Grab and Go Bag GAG Bag :D
  • vanoonoovanoonoo Forumite
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    Frugal wrote: »
    love threads like this, esp the links to various sites :)

    So, thanks x
    you're welcome! thanks for posting - I will link in some of the other useful threads too when I can spend a bit more time and edit the links properly - too tired to mess with html tonight!
    Blah
  • vanoonoovanoonoo Forumite
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    Our wind up torch was from ikea! And very good it is too :p

    The website 72hours.org is very good for advice on go-bags, and what to do in different situations. It's designed for people in the San Francisco area, but the advice is relevant to everywhere really.

    two great resource empressemma - brilliant! thankyou! had no idea that ikea had those funky torches and not seen that 72 hours.org site - might be that long before I am back here and I now need to go and read through it! :T
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  • vanoonoovanoonoo Forumite
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    Frugal wrote: »
    Love the other term for the BugOutBag, Grab and Go Bag GAG Bag :D
    LOL! perhaps that's what us oldstylers should call ours - the smell of mothballs may well make us GAG when the time comes to use them ;)
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  • vanoonoovanoonoo Forumite
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    j.e.j. wrote: »
    Thanks, I think I will keep an eye out for a wind-up lantern. I first read about them when reading The Moneyless Man by Mark Boyle. He was living off-grid, and used one at night to read by. Actually the book might be of interest to people on here, not for going 'moneyless' but there's lots of ideas in there for spending as little as possible and living sustainably.
    I've popped a link to the book on amazon - other booksellers are available folks! thank you j.e.j.
    Blah
  • Ohhhhh I live within reasonable distance of a nuclear power station and every now & then think *what if*:o

    I know what I'd need to take to evacuate somewhere - the problem is that I'd need a trailer or something to put just the pets & their stuff in, let alone mine:eek: - it just won't fit in Dinky (aptly named & much loved but very teeeny car!):

    2 cats - in separate carriers (one takes up the whole front seat)
    1 dog - who takes up the whole back seat (would have to try to squash 2nd cat on there somewhere too:eek:)
    cat litter tray
    cat litter (could put an unopened bag in the litter tray I guess)
    cat food / bowls (boxes would take up the whole boot!)
    dog food / bowls (mmmmm run out of room already!)
    dog bed (maybe not essential but) ....

    You might laugh - but as long as I go them & all their stuff in and could grab my medications .... I'd be reasonably happy.

    ETA loving the 72hour.org site ..... thanks for that!
    Grocery Challenge £211/£455 (01/01-31/03)
    2016 Sell: £125/£250
    £1,000 Emergency Fund Challenge #78 £3.96 / £1,000
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    Debt free & determined to stay that way!
  • vanoonoovanoonoo Forumite
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    you have my sympathy - I have a bulldog, two cats, a husband of 6'2" and my car is a mini!!!
    Blah
  • GigervampGigervamp Forumite
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    I'd never fit our lab, 2 cats, 40ish chickens and 3 ducks into our car!
  • SammyD_2SammyD_2 Forumite
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    Last year we had a real SHTF day - the earthquakes in Christchurch New Zealand. Fortunately, that is unlikely to happen in the UK, but having had no water, no power, no flushing toilet for days/weeks, being stranded in a multistory building with collapsed stairs and then walking 15 miles home (parking building with car in it collapsed) my practical recommendations are:

    1. Never let car get less than half full of petrol - no electricity means no petrol pumps work and if they are, everyone wants it
    2. Always have cash - you might not be able to get any for a while.
    3. Torch, battery radio and spare batteries, AND a wind up radio/torch as well.
    4. Keep walking shoes at work, and in the car, as well as warm clothing and water (think about transport disruptions).
    5. Store cupboard - keep water, tins and an opener and some high calorie food like chocolate (although it is quite hard to keep it there in my house...)
    6. Large bin bags, and one of those large, outdoor rubbish bins (plastic) - you can make an outdoor toilet out of these if needed. Kitty litter is also useful in that regard.
    7. Also keep hand gel and baby wipes - prevents you feeling completely manky.
    8. Know where medication is for all members of the family and keep plenty of pet food on hand, as well as the file of important docs (birth certificates, insurance details etc).
    9. Have a plan B and C with all members of family. EG which way will you travel between home and work in the event of an emergency.
    10. Do not count on having mobile coverage - do not ring, send a text - it is much more likely to get through eventually and uses less battery. Keep your mobile charged and know where it is.
    11. Keep a torch by your bed. Know where your shoes are. Our first earthquake was a 7 magnitude at 4.35am - it is amazing in the pitch black what you trip over, and what you cant find.

    Hopefully, you won't ever need any of it, but you really will be grateful if the worst does happen.
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