store first

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Pensions, Annuities & Retirement Planning
210 replies 95K views
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  • golmaalgolmaal Forumite
    10 Posts
    Wots the general feeling on investing in stamps with Stanley Gibbons
  • dunstonhdunstonh Forumite
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    golmaal wrote: »
    Wots the general feeling on investing in stamps with Stanley Gibbons

    Madness.

    Unless you have the capital and knowledge to pick up the really old rare stamps, you are just going to waste money as the volume in modern day editions is too high to see them being worth any value in your lifetime (and probably a good number of generations later).
    I am an Independent Financial Adviser (IFA). The comments I make are just my opinion and are for discussion purposes only. They are not financial advice and you should not treat them as such. If you feel an area discussed may be relevant to you, then please seek advice from an Independent Financial Adviser local to you.
  • redbuzzardredbuzzard Forumite
    698 Posts
    golmaal wrote: »
    Wots the general feeling on investing in stamps with Stanley Gibbons

    I suggest you start a separate thread for that. This one is about StoreFirst.

    Unless you were being ironic.
    "Things are never so bad they can't be made worse" - Humphrey Bogart
  • redbuzzardredbuzzard Forumite
    698 Posts
    golmaal wrote: »
    Received money for my £51k investment. It's a no brainer. Invest the money and see the money rolling in. Received my title deeds aswell. So it's mine. I can sell back to them after 6 years or keep

    It certainly is a no brainer. It didn't take me long to ignore it anyway.

    What would we say to someone who asked if it was wise to put all of their pension into, say, Unilever? And yet, by comparison, Unilever is infinitely diversified. And as an equity holder, your interests are aligned with those of the management.

    storefirst has one product, in one market*, and has come up with a highly leveraged business plan that substantially transfers the risk of that leverage to non-equity holders. It looks similar to investing in risky bonds. The returns are high because the risk is high.

    I certainly don't turn my nose up at 8% annual return. But it comes at a price, and that is risk - that the return is unsustainable, and that the asset could become worthless (you do not own the ground on which it sits).

    Note that I do not suggest this is a scam. Just a very high risk investment for unit buyers, and totally unsuitable IMO for something as important as a pension fund. It looks like quite a smart business idea - but remember you are not buying shares in it - you are buying from it, and trusting it to look after your asset and work it for you. A different proposition entirely.

    *by which I meant of course storage rental...but is their business really selling units? I haven't tried to work it out, but at £150 per square foot they would seem to be covering their costs, and providing they construct what they can sell then that buys them an income from it in management fees and service charges. So who are their customers - renters, or investors?
    "Things are never so bad they can't be made worse" - Humphrey Bogart
  • Hi
    I have looked at hundreds of opportunities and have finally landed at a safety first position

    I am going with Bridge Funding.

    Return is 9% per annum and my money is secured against the buildings that the lending is given to on a first charge basis.

    They lend and charge high rates of interest on short term basis of 6months to a year. The lending is usually at 70% of the value of the premises so they can sell in hurry.

    They are lending on London property and only take deals they know they can sell straight away in default.

    So rather than go for all those shcemes that only give projected or estimated or unsecured returns ....I went for this.

    Having said all that,I am cautious so for those who like a gamble it probably isn't for them.









    manuman wrote: »
    Hi anyone heard of store first investments. I have a final salary pension of 137k and am thinking of transferring it to a sipp and invest in the store first investment plan through clp brokers. You get a guaranteed 8% in the first year then rising to 12% by year 5 and 6 and you get the first years paid to you in cash or put into your pension pot. Any body heard about this ?
  • dunstonhdunstonh Forumite
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    Having said all that,I am cautious so for those who like a gamble it probably isn't for them.

    Have you got that around the wrong way? This is a gamble and not suitable for those that are cautious.
    I am an Independent Financial Adviser (IFA). The comments I make are just my opinion and are for discussion purposes only. They are not financial advice and you should not treat them as such. If you feel an area discussed may be relevant to you, then please seek advice from an Independent Financial Adviser local to you.
  • golmaalgolmaal Forumite
    10 Posts
    Thanx for the advice. I've invested the money now. I will just have to sit tight and see what happens. I have the option of selling back after 6 years. It's savings and not my pension. But only time will tell
  • golmaalgolmaal Forumite
    10 Posts
    I've inherited some money and its burning a hole on my pocket
  • mjdh1957mjdh1957 Forumite
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    golmaal wrote: »
    I've inherited some money and its burning a hole on my pocket

    That's probably the worst way to make a serious investment. Research and assessment of risk take time....

    Lots of people get their fingers burnt by rushing into things without having a clear picture of what they are actually doing.
    Retired in 2015.
    Moved to Ireland September 2017
  • golmaalgolmaal Forumite
    10 Posts
    What do you suggest
This discussion has been closed.
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