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MPGS - What's it Like??

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in UK Armed Forces MoneySaving
166 replies 89.1K views
MissKittyMissKitty Forumite
89 posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in UK Armed Forces MoneySaving
Hi all

Someone in my family is just about to leave the army after 24 years service and is thinking about joining the Military Provist Guard Service (MPGS).

I was wondering if there is any ex soldiers out there that are currently in the MPGS that could pass on a bit of advice.

The starting pay is only £18,237.48 so quiet a drop from SNCO levels.
How quick is it to get through the ranks and what's the job like? has anyone else found it hard leaving the army and taking such a big pay cut? I know my family member has a pension to top up the pay so that helps a bit.

Does anyone have any experience of how long it takes APC Glasgow to get through your application and hopefully offer you a job?

Any advice for my family member would be appreciated.
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Replies

  • EsoogEsoog Users Awaiting Email Confirmation
    1.5K posts
    Not MPGS but the application process can sometimes take ageeeeeees; for no apparent reason. For instance someone I know (incidentally went NRPS in the end) put in an MPGS application; its was 9 months before anyone got back to him; the application is still in process now even though he has an NRPS (to be ftrs) post as they've not checked with him for ages. I monitor his (lack of) progress on TRHJ occasionally.

    The 203(or is it 208??) form that gets sent off to check previous service record really doesn't take that long so no idea why some applications take so long heh. I think it can depend on the AFCO.


    What's it like? Who knows, but stagging on the gate all day...what fun! :rotfl:But some people love it as it's an extension of service life really.
  • Thanks for your post.

    He is looking at it as more of a last option as there isn't many decent jobs that are well paid in the area he lives in.

    He has been told that they are desperate to recruit MPGS. I cant understand why the process can take so long when he has got 24 years service under his belt.

    It's a big move being in one job for 24 years then suddenly being in the big bad world, it's not exactly the best time to be leaving with all the recruitment bans and redundancies going on.
  • EsoogEsoog Users Awaiting Email Confirmation
    1.5K posts
    Yeah they are pretty keen to get more people methinks (despite a big freeze not too long ago...)

    I think the delay comes down to AFCO staff who probably don't view MPGS as their priorities/or aren't under as much "pressure" to process their applications as quickly, and the fact that the Wing at APC dealing with former service isn't actually that big (ie a few people for the whole country).

    The obvious benefit to the MPGS jobs are; decent steady wage and promotion, housing (SFA certainly) and being in the Army enviroment still. There's nothing to say he couldn't join up and do a few years whilst looking for other jobs/doing some quals etc. :]
  • gt568gt568 Forumite
    2.3K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts
    ✭✭✭✭
    Barrier up, barrier down. Simples.
    :silenced: Down with the signature fascists!!:naughty:
  • Hello,

    My Hubby has been with MPGS for nearly 5 years after serving 24 also.

    We came back to England after 10 years in Germany for his last 6 months & he applied for the MPGS.

    He was advised to nag and nag and nag, as insiders told us the local "station" was desperate.

    Initially he was offered a post some 70 miles away, but he asked about our local camp, did the training & started.

    Nag, Nag, Nag is the advice I'd give.

    When on the phone, he'd talk to an army bloke first then next it would be a navy bloke who was none the wiser of the first call etc.

    Yep, the pay is pants, but we knew that, but we still get his pension now & an SFA and all the benefits.( and his final pension will be added to) For us, knowing he is not going to be deployed again, a regular wage and a job until he is 55 along with security for the kids is enough.

    Some do sail quickly through the ranks but again, they have to make noises that they want promotion and most of the time promotion means moving.

    Most importantly, it means my hubby who was institutionalised in the army at the age of 16 is able to maintain his institutionalised lifestyle rather than having to live in the big wide world.
    Hope this helps.
  • oscardogoscardog Forumite
    364 posts
    Is like being a soldier permanently doing extras.
  • Hello,

    My Hubby has been with MPGS for nearly 5 years after serving 24 also.

    We came back to England after 10 years in Germany for his last 6 months & he applied for the MPGS.

    He was advised to nag and nag and nag, as insiders told us the local "station" was desperate.

    Initially he was offered a post some 70 miles away, but he asked about our local camp, did the training & started.

    Nag, Nag, Nag is the advice I'd give.

    When on the phone, he'd talk to an army bloke first then next it would be a navy bloke who was none the wiser of the first call etc.

    Yep, the pay is pants, but we knew that, but we still get his pension now & an SFA and all the benefits.( and his final pension will be added to) For us, knowing he is not going to be deployed again, a regular wage and a job until he is 55 along with security for the kids is enough.

    Some do sail quickly through the ranks but again, they have to make noises that they want promotion and most of the time promotion means moving.

    Most importantly, it means my hubby who was institutionalised in the army at the age of 16 is able to maintain his institutionalised lifestyle rather than having to live in the big wide world.
    Hope this helps.



    Thank you for your reply, I haven't been on here for a few weeks so I have only just noticed it.

    My hubby is also just about to finish after 24 years service and has applied like his family member. He has submitted all the paperwork but their not very quick at doing anything. He has been told that if he gets taken on he cant start till 4 weeks after the date he officially leaves the army.

    He knows there is jobs available at our local camp as he has been to speak to the guy in charge. I think he will have to keep bugging Glasgow to get a response.

    The money is rubbish but I guess the pension bumps it up, but like you say their doing what they enjoy and know but not getting deployed.

    Thanks for your comments, it's always good to hear from someone who is already in that life.
  • EsoogEsoog Users Awaiting Email Confirmation
    1.5K posts
    MissKitty wrote: »
    Thank you for your reply, I haven't been on here for a few weeks so I have only just noticed it.

    My hubby is also just about to finish after 24 years service and has applied like his family member. He has submitted all the paperwork but their not very quick at doing anything. He has been told that if he gets taken on he cant start till 4 weeks after the date he officially leaves the army.

    He knows there is jobs available at our local camp as he has been to speak to the guy in charge. I think he will have to keep bugging Glasgow to get a response.

    The money is rubbish but I guess the pension bumps it up, but like you say their doing what they enjoy and know but not getting deployed.

    Thanks for your comments, it's always good to hear from someone who is already in that life.

    The money is rubbish compared to what they have been paid in the Army, however it's a decent wage on civvy street these days. I don't known anything about your husband (and I'm not talking about him personally), he could be traded and qualified up to his eyeballs - but most aren't - in all honesty would he have got paid as much as he did in civvy street as he did in the Army? Doubtful really, I know WO2s on 40k that would struggle to get a job as a (insert menial job here) in reality. So if he gets the job take it as bonus! A little easy money after 24 years of being messed around :D And remember there's plenty of people that would love the pants mpgs pay :>
  • Esoog wrote: »
    The money is rubbish compared to what they have been paid in the Army, however it's a decent wage on civvy street these days. I don't known anything about your husband (and I'm not talking about him personally), he could be traded and qualified up to his eyeballs - but most aren't - in all honesty would he have got paid as much as he did in civvy street as he did in the Army? Doubtful really, I know WO2s on 40k that would struggle to get a job as a (insert menial job here) in reality. So if he gets the job take it as bonus! A little easy money after 24 years of being messed around :D And remember there's plenty of people that would love the pants mpgs pay :>

    Your quiet right in what you say.

    When he first mentioned about applying for the MPGS and what the wages were I felt a bit disappointed for him, after working so hard for 24 years and working his way up the ranks, to start at the bottom again with such a low wage felt like a bit of a slap round the face for him.

    After hours/days/weeks of trawling the internet in search of a new career you soon realise that the pay in the army when you work your way up is pretty good compared to civvy street and there was no way he was ever going to match it unless he is very highly qualified and goes into a management positions.

    We've had a fantastic time traveling around the world over the years and our daughter has had some great experiences for such a young child, she's been places and seen things that alot of children her age wouldn't get to see, thanks to my husbands career.

    At the end of the day it's a stable job till he's 55 and no deployment. We would rather have him home at the end of the day and have a normal life. It's made me realise we will be quiet lucky if he does get the job as there is so much unemployment at the moment.

    I will miss the summer ball's though, I loved the chance to get dressed up and have a good night out. All good things come to an end!!
  • Jud546Jud546 Forumite
    19 posts
    Hi,
    I'm also trying to get into the MPGS for the same reasons as cited by the OP. I have had my application in since December and have been pestering my AFCO at least once a month to find out any progress, but kept getting told "no news, you'll just have to wait".
    The last I heard was beginning of April when I rang the AFCO again and he said that my application was with the career manager at Glasgow and was basically told 'don't call us, we'll call you when we hear something'.

    With this in mind, does anybody know of a number at Glasgow or elsewhere I can call to check up on my application progress? To be honest I've lost confidence in the AFCO who are supposed to be acting on my behalf.

    Cheers.
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