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MSE News: EU consumer protection laws move closer

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Shop but don't drop
7 replies 1.8K views
Former_MSE_HelenFormer_MSE_Helen
2.4K posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Shop but don't drop
This is the discussion thread for the following MSE News Story:

"The new EU Consumer Rights Directive aims to strengthen consumers' rights, particularly when shopping online ..."

Replies

  • taxsavertaxsaver Forumite
    620 posts
    EU justice commissioner Viviane Reding says: "The new EU Consumer Rights Directive will strengthen consumer rights by outlawing internet fraudsters who trick people into paying for horoscopes or recipes that appear to be offered for free.

    How can you possibly be 'tricked' into paying for something that you 'thought' was free??!! What is there about giving your card details that isn't obvious to someone?

    I can also see many clothes retailers in particular being badly ripped off by people 'borrowing' clothes for events and then returning them, knowing they will even get their postage back now.

    I'm all for protection, but some of this is just stupid.
    If you feel my comments are helpful then I'd love it if you 'Thanked' me! :)
  • ChiefGrasscutterChiefGrasscutter Forumite
    2.1K posts
    Part of the Furniture Combo Breaker
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    Wasn't there some 'governement advisor' advocating a few months ago that one of the ways of getting the UK ecnonomy going was to SCRAP all consumer protection leglislation.
  • edited 25 October 2011 at 10:25PM
    CoolHotColdCoolHotCold Forumite
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    Ninth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Combo Breaker
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    edited 25 October 2011 at 10:25PM
    GAK, a little misleading on the return times

    The DSR state it's 7 working days, so usually you get at least 9 full days to inspect the item, the EU rules will expand it to 14 days, working and non working, so it'll give a maximum of 5 days extra, not all that spectacular (and the 9 days is based on you receive it on Saturday, if you receive a item on Friday you get 11 full days to inform of your intent to return the items)

    Also currently under the DSR you are already entitled to your delivery costs (regardless of what delivery option you choose) but the new EU rules seem to state that only the cheapest delivery option will be refunded.

    So yes, a change, but not a big change some good, some bad.


    *Edit*

    Also new rule for the DSR's under them the retailer had 30 days to return the money paid, now they will have 14 days.
  • chattychappychattychappy Forumite
    7.3K posts
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    Yet again, the EU dreaming up more regulations to impose upon us. Nobody voted for this "commissioner". I'm sure she has a very nice office and staff to support her. Real consumer protection would be not being forced to pay taxes to pay for all this nonsense.

    If the regime needs changing, it can be changed here. I think the balance is right as it is.
  • Yet again, the EU dreaming up more regulations to impose upon us. Nobody voted for this "commissioner". I'm sure she has a very nice office and staff to support her. Real consumer protection would be not being forced to pay taxes to pay for all this nonsense.
    Actually, Viviane Reding has been rather useful, and has been willing to take action where the UK government has refused (have a look at Phorm for instance). Whilst I don't think the DSR needed altering (although reducing the 30 day refund time to 14 seems reasonable, however, there are enough companies that seem to ignore the DSR as-is), the removal of credit/debit card surcharges (IMHO Ryan Air is ridiculous) and the practice of pre-selection is something that is needed.
  • mo786ukmo786uk Forumite
    1.4K posts
    UK Government departments contribute to consultations on new legislation.

    We would still have most consumer protection laws if the EU wasnt there, but they would be less stronger.
  • DimitrisXDimitrisX Forumite
    22 posts
    Eighth Anniversary Combo Breaker
    Yet again, the EU dreaming up more regulations to impose upon us. Nobody voted for this "commissioner". I'm sure she has a very nice office and staff to support her. Real consumer protection would be not being forced to pay taxes to pay for all this nonsense.

    If the regime needs changing, it can be changed here. I think the balance is right as it is.

    Just as you didn't vote for the Chancellor of the Exchequer, but the elected Parliament, aka the Cοmmons, approved of him, the European Commission members have been unanimously proposed by the goverments of the EU states and approved by the elected representatives in the European Parliament. Especially Ms Reading has been behind those regulations that cap EU Roaming talk and text rates (data coming soon), allowing us to talk and text while on work or on holidays in Europe with reasonable rates (it was clear telcos were robbing us)...

    Furthermore, the commissioner just proposed the bill, which became a [STRIKE]Law[/STRIKE]Directive only after it was scrutinised and and approved by Parliament. Let alone that the Parliament mostly issues directives (rather than regulations, which are for emergencies or pan-european matters, like the aforementioned call rate caps) that are implemented by each EU government seperately within a timeframe and are adjusted for the needs of the respective nation.

    Last but not least, the 7-day cooling-off period was rather a British invention proved successful and adopted for the Directive. Few EU countries currently have such a provision.
This discussion has been closed.

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