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Great 'Things to do when you move' Hunt

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Great 'Things to do when you move' Hunt

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in House Buying, Renting & Selling
86 replies 51.8K views
Former_MSE_LeeFormer_MSE_Lee Former Editorial Assistant
343 posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in House Buying, Renting & Selling
Great 'Things to do when you move' Hunt


It can be one of the most stressful life events, there are stacks of things to remember to do. So we want to tap MoneySavers' collective knowledge to get your top tips on what to do when you move. Whether it's changing addresses, comparing energy tariffs or getting a cheap cleaning service.

Give us your tips!


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  • edited 3 September 2010 at 10:45AM
    jacandjacand Forumite
    562 posts
    Part of the Furniture
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    edited 3 September 2010 at 10:45AM
    I usually run my food cupboards and freezer down to the bare minimum, then place an online food order for everything with delivery going to my new address. Saves all the hassle.
    I also keep a list on my computer of all the companies that I deal with such as gas, electric, banks, telephone, internet, vets, doctors etc. I keep this up to date with the low rate telephone numbers, that I find on saynoto0870. This way if when my phone line gets switched off, I can still use my mobile to call them relatively cheaply if I need to.
  • I'd be particularly wary about signing up for moveme.com. I signed up via Royal Mail because they offered to send a box of stuff to your new address, like sponges, coffee, milk, tea, even Fanta, which I was very happy to receive. Unfortunately, I was also contacted by their call centre staff advising me to switch the energy provider at my new place. I got very annoyed by their persistent calls; I ended up having to screen and not pick up my calls for a week before they gave up!

    I did quite like using moveme's address changing utilities, and receiving the welcome box was quite cool, but I'd be more careful about putting in any real phone numbers and ticking any checkboxes just in case.

    On another note, I think the Royal Mail redirection service is fab! I initially signed up for one month's redirection, and since I was getting loads of letters redirected, I decided to extend it for another month.
  • I gave the new owners a few sheets of Avery labels pre-printed with our new address to forward anything that fell "between the cracks" during the Royal Mail redirection. There was a surprising amount, as we'd forgotten to change all our magazine subscriptions. Also useful because you will get birthday cards and Christmas cards from people you don't often hear from long after you've moved and stopped the Royal Mail service. We could have just left our address, but the pre-printed labels hopefully made it really quick and easy .

    I had the hoover and a box of cleaning products alongside the usual box of moving essentials (tea, kettle, mugs, loo paper, lightbulbs, dinner for the first night and so on) along with me in the car. It meant I could give the new place a quick once-over before all the heavy furniture was set down.

    I boxed up our most precious sentimental things and gave them to a friend for safekeeping so they didn't get broken or go missing in the chaos of the move.

    I wish I'd remembered to change my Amazon delivery details on one-click. My new parcels were delivered to my old address, duh. This was nearly as bad as my friend who moved from Liverpool to London and then realised she'd left her drycleaning behind, still in the shop!

    I wish I'd packed a few complete changes of clothes so things weren't such a scramble the first few days, before I got the wardrobes sorted. If you were moving at this time of year, extra clothes for unseasonal weather might also be useful.
  • tealadytealady Forumite
    3.4K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Mortgage-free Glee! Debt-free and Proud!
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    Get the beds up and made 1st job. There is nothing worse than being knackered end of moving day then having to make beds.
    Also pack kitchen and bathroom basics in clearly labelled boxes and make sure they are out 1st. Saves the embarassment of having helpers sat on the loo whilst you hunt for the bog roll.
    Proud to be an MSE nerd
    Judge people by their achievements, not by their mistakes
  • ThinkingOfLinkingThinkingOfLinking Forumite
    11.8K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Combo Breaker
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    I just moved yesterday and am still unpacking today.
    As well as hiring a competent removals firm, something I unfortunately didn't do and now have to email a complaint to their head office, I'd recommend the following:
    Eat your way through as much of your food as possible over the preceding period, slowly stripping the contents of your fridge, freezer and cupboards.
    Check EACH item before packing it; are you sure you want it?
    Make a note of what is in each and every box; 91 boxes all stacked up doesn't make it easy to find what you want in a hurry. Also think about getting coloured highlighters and just doing a big X on each box, according to house area, eg blue for bedroom, yellow for bathroom, green for kitchen, pink for kids' room, orange for living room, etc, so you can at least have somewhere to start!!
  • edinburgheredinburgher Forumite
    11.9K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
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    Make a note of what is in each and every box; 91 boxes all stacked up doesn't make it easy to find what you want in a hurry

    This is a very good idea. Also, it allows you extra security if you're moving with a firm you're unfamiliar with/can't find feedback on. For example, instead of writing 'Nintendo Wii' and £1000 worth of games on a box, '1' works just as well (assuming you keep a spreadsheet/list of what's in what box). If you do, save an electronic copy as well as a hard copy, as paper can and will go missing...

    My tips:
    • Start planning months in advance - the more you do quickly, the easier it will be on the day. Remember those 'Christmas planning' articles that used to appear in lifestyle/TV magazines? Like those ;)
    • Start creating a list of all the companies that you need to contact with changes of address. If most of these only mail you things irregularly, you can start a few weeks before you move. Mail redirection is a good deal for large families, but may be overly expensive for a couple :money:
    • Buy good quality packing boxes and plenty of parcel tape/bubble wrap - it is far less stressful than cobbling together your own moving supplies from supermarket cardboard boxes etc. As ever, the best prices are online
    • Unless you're self-moving, keep a folder/case with any paperwork that can't be replaced on your person. I'd recommend keeping your laptops seperate, too.
    • Keep a list of contact numbers for: the estate agents/letting agent/local council/intended utility supplier/BT/cable TV company - you'll need these to hand if there are any problems
    • Unpack as soon as you can - it's stressful enough moving house without living out of boxes for months. Yes, you might be tired, but one short, sharp shock is better than days of stress!
    • Take a note of any small defects that you missed when viewing the property. If you've bought the property, these will become your 'to do' list, if you're renting, you'll be chasing someone else to fix them :)
  • pavlovs_dogpavlovs_dog Forumite
    10.1K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Combo Breaker
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    we're exchanging and completing on our first home on friday so this couldn't have come at a better time for us :j
    know thyself
    Nid wy'n gofyn bywyd moethus...
  • I gave the new owners a few sheets of Avery labels pre-printed with our new address to forward anything that fell "between the cracks" during the Royal Mail redirection. There was a surprising amount, as we'd forgotten to change all our magazine subscriptions. Also useful because you will get birthday cards and Christmas cards from people you don't often hear from long after you've moved and stopped the Royal Mail service. We could have just left our address, but the pre-printed labels hopefully made it really quick and easy

    Did the labels just have your new address or did they say "Please redirect to... etc". I'm sure there was a post a few weeks ago saying that in these circumstances the person who received the mail would have to pay for delivery and a surcharge?
    MSE aim: more thanks than posts :j
  • edited 3 September 2010 at 10:46AM
    [MaccA][MaccA] Forumite
    94 posts
    edited 3 September 2010 at 10:46AM
    Take a meter reading at the old and new house. If possible use a camera or phone to take a picture. Saves losing a scrap of paper with it written on and can provide solid evidence if there is a dispute.
  • Start packing up sooner than you think you need to, giving yourself enough time to sort through everything you own to decide whether to take, sell, charity shop or dump each item.

    I speak from experience of leaving it all to the last few days, and having just to stick everything into boxes, promising myself we'll sort it out as we unpack. So we paid to move more stuff than necessary, and a lot of it is still lying around in boxes months after the move...
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