'Tell the USA your views on the NHS' poll results/discussion

edited 25 August 2009 at 11:01AM in Money Saving Polls
49 replies 6.9K views
Former_MSE_LawrenceFormer_MSE_Lawrence Former MSE
975 Posts
edited 25 August 2009 at 11:01AM in Money Saving Polls
Poll between 17-25 August 2009:

Tell the USA your views on the NHS.

There’s a furore in the USA about healthcare policy, and some say President Obama’s planned actions are equivalent to setting up a NHS. That’s meant huge debate over there about the service we have over here.

Which of these is closest to your message to the USA?

A. Big Thumbs Up. Free healthcare has always worked for me, go for it. - 27% (3739 votes)
B. Thumbs Up. It’s got its faults but it's better than any ‘pay’ system. - 50% (6879 votes)
C. Thumbs Up-ish. It needs serious change, but on balance I’d still recommend it. - 17% (2371 votes)
D. Thumbs Down-ish. It has some good elements, but on balance I’d stick with what you’ve got. - 2% (317 votes)
E. Thumbs Down. It hardly works, we need radical change to make it passable. - 2% (253 votes)
F. Big Thumbs Down. We need to scrap our outdated, outmoded system. - 2% (279 votes)

This vote has now closed, but you can still click 'post reply' to discuss below. Thanks :)

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Replies

  • Poll Started 17 August 2009:

    Tell the USA your views on the NHS.

    There’s a furore in the USA about healthcare policy, and some say President Obama’s planned actions are equivalent to setting up a NHS. That’s meant huge debate over there about the service we have over here.

    Which of these is closest to your message to the USA?

    A. Big Thumbs Up. Free healthcare has always worked for me, go for it.
    B. Thumbs Up. It’s got its faults but it's better than any ‘pay’ system.
    C. Thumbs Up-ish. It needs serious change, but on balance I’d still recommend it.
    D. Thumbs Down-ish. It has some good elements, but on balance I’d stick with what you’ve got.
    E. Thumbs Down. It hardly works, we need radical change to make it passable.
    F. Big Thumbs Down. We need to scrap our outdated, outmoded system.

    Please vote here, or click 'post reply' to discuss below. Thanks :)

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    Though it's got faults I am all for the NHS. I know quite a few Americans, hell I'm even in a relationship with one, and having heard first hand what they put up with I am very grateful for what we have.

    Yes, pretty much everyone has a horror story to tell about their experiences with the NHS, but it is better than having to have health insurance and if not having to wait through the night at a free clinic hoping they'll have time to see you, or worrying that because of something in your health records you won't even be allowed insurance anyway.
    The "Bloodlust" Clique - Morally equal to all. Member 1/Official 'Bring back Mark and Lard NOW! or else (please)' Member 18
    "We all pay for life with death, so everything in between should be free." Bill Hicks
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  • edited 17 August 2009 at 2:04PM
    mehermeher
    15.9K Posts
    10,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    edited 17 August 2009 at 2:04PM
    The concept of NHS is simply perfect, the only problem with this vision has been that when the system was designed to offer everyone health, they forgot to consider the effect it would have, which was that people lived longer and became elderly. So the elderly care has been inadequate for want of home care and many are having to leave their homes they lovingly built and took great pride in, to settle for nursing homes for the rest of their lives. I think NHS should consider community care and outreach work seriously and if the US could do that as well, it would be just fantastic.

    Aside, my understanding is that US too spends the same proportion as that of the UK on health care, the difference being in the UK everyone is covered, so I don't see why they shouldn't consider having an NHS.

    ETA: middle-management and their interference is what costs NHS, more power to those who work with patients, ie. health professionals shoud have total freedom to find solutions, throwing money at health care provisions is not the solution, instead to make the best of what's already there
  • simongregsonsimongregson Forumite
    846 Posts
    Part of the Furniture 500 Posts Name Dropper
    Forumite
    It amazes me that a country of the USA's resources does not have a comprehensive healthcare system.

    There are of course faults with the NHS, but the principle of a healthcare system based on need and free at the point of access is one of the major achievements of this country, and something that most people of whatever political persuasion are justifiably proud of. It is unfortunately in our nature to moan, and a lot of americans have misunderstood this as meaning we would rather not have our NHS.

    There are vested interests in the USA who don't like the idea of healthcare based upon need and would rather that it is based on the ability to pay. This 'dog eat dog' mentality is not the mark of a civilised society, and I really hope that Obama forces through the change that the majority of the American public have given him a mandate for.
  • If the NHS is such a great system, why has the world not copied it? To say that Obama is about to is wrong. He's attempting to create universal compulsary health insurance. More similar to the rest of europe than our own NHS.

    When you look at the survivial rates for most cancers, the world beats us. The NHS is not the envy of the world.

    The sad thing is, when people criticise the NHS they are labelled as people that want to abolish it and let poor people die, and only have decent healthcare for the rich.

    Universal high quality healthcare is possible, unfortunalty a 60 year old socialist model the rest of the world wouldn't touch with a barge pole is not the answer.
    I wonder why it is, that young men are always cautioned against bad girls. Anyone can handle a bad girl. It's the good girls men should be warned against.-David Niven
  • The problem though with the health insurance system is that people would go into hospitals only in emergencies, which doesn't exactly address the essence of keeping yourself healthy, neither does it compliment evidence based medical practice nor would there be any emphasis or scope for preventative medicine.
  • Hospital are filthy, people are better off steering clear. If you want to stay healthy, best thing to do is steer clear of doctors and hospitals.
    I wonder why it is, that young men are always cautioned against bad girls. Anyone can handle a bad girl. It's the good girls men should be warned against.-David Niven
  • Mr_MumbleMr_Mumble Forumite
    1.8K Posts
    Very poorly constructed poll. The NHS is not 'free' and the Americans are not being asked if they want an NHS-type system (though arguably a state-subsidised "public-option" has the same main downside - you have to pay twice for treatments the government deems too expensive).

    The NHS has had an unsustainable boost in spending from banking and property taxes that are not coming back. It's hard to qualify what a sustainable NHS would look like or how other public services would suffer if NHS spending was maintained at about 8% of GDP (notably far higher than the 3.5% of the early 1950s). Even if real government health spending could be kept static this would be enormously problematic with the retiring baby-boomer generation leading to greater requirements for healthcare.
    "The state is the great fiction by which everybody seeks to live at the expense of everybody else." -- Frederic Bastiat, 1848.
  • I have had a lot of experience of NHS hospitals as my husband has a neurological condition. Hand on heart I have never seen or entered a dirty hospital. Hubby has had first class treatment. Neurosurgical unit that treats hubby is one of the best (if not the best) in Europe - I Googled and found the stats:D. My husband is uninsurable as regards life insurance, he would have no chance of obtaining health insurance. Is the NHS perfect - H*ll No! Far too many Managers and Administrators. In certain areas of the UK the NHS is under strain from the volume of people. There are problems, no system is perfect.
  • The issue I have with it all is that American right wing groups think Obama wants to create NHS USA. He doesn't. What he wants to do is create a government insurance scheme to provide health insurance to people who can't afford to get it privately, which will then drive down costs of private health insurance to allow it to compete, which will make it cheaper and therefore more affordable to more people.

    (Sorry, but people who don't find out the facts before shooting their mouths off about things really irritate me.)

    [/rant]

    I went for option B - granted the NHS is not brilliant but I'd far rather have it than have to have private health insurance, because I simply can't afford that out of my own pocket and as someone who has a couple of underlying medical conditions, one of which is most likely genetic, chances are on a US system I might not get it.

    This article was published in the Independent on Saturday: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/the-brutal-truth-about-americarsquos-healthcare-1772580.html I defy anyone to read it and not think that universal health care in some shape or form is a good idea. People shouldn't be denied (what I think is) a basic human right just because they can't afford it.

    Although this has prompted a weird thought - is there such a thing as an American version of MSE? As I assume were this scheme put in place, then when Americans were renewing their health insurance they could go, "Well I can get government insurance for $xxx a year," which seems very MSE to me...
    "A mind needs books as a sword needs a whetstone, if it is to keep its edge." - Tyrion Lannister
    Married my best friend 1st November 2014
    Loose = the opposite of tight (eg "These trousers feel a little loose")
    Lose = the opposite of find/gain (eg "I'm going to lose weight this year")
  • Loyalty to the NHS is very nice but let's not delude ourselves that the system is faultless

    The NHS faults are:
    1. Political intervention is huge. All the targets? money spent on popular health causes and and endless new strategies and changes to grab headlines

    2. that joe public has little motivation to keep healthy and do all the checkups etc they should so. Our cancer treatment is v good but we spot cancer too late and do too few tests and checkups. I'd go for my cancer checkups if my insurance cover depended on it

    3. It's almost impossible to sack incompetant doctors, surgeons and nurses. A very small number of people can do a huge amount of damage. It is only recently that performance data has been made available.

    I hope Obama gets it right and we can move in his direction.
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