Why say “I'm on annual leave”? blog discussion

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Martin's Blogs & Appearances & MoneySavingExpert in the News
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This is the discussion to link on the back of Martin's blog. Please read the blog first, as this discussion follows it.
Read Martin's "Why say 'I'm on annual leave'?" Blog.
Click reply to discuss below.
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  • x3jax3ja Forumite
    41 Posts
    I use "annual leave" because saying you're "on holiday" sounds like you're always jetting off to somewhere exotic, whereas you might just be enjoying a few long lie-ins. However, I do say "holiday" when that's what I'm doing - like when I'm off to Morocco soon - can't wait to see the sun - I've forgotten what it looks like! :j
  • JimmyTheWigJimmyTheWig Forumite
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    It differentiates from other types of leave - paternity leave, sick leave, sabbatical, etc.
  • AdastaAdasta Forumite
    28 Posts
    Because it's the type of leave which is given annually?
  • lonestar1lonestar1 Forumite
    560 Posts
    I say Im on Annual Leave because I rarely go on actual holidays but If I tell some of my work collegues Im just lazing around at home they may be tempted to call me at home if a problem crops up
  • John_GrayJohn_Gray Forumite
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    Saying I'm on annual leave is just a less offensive (and shorter) way of saying Yes, I knew perfectly well I was not going to be in at work, but I didn't make any effort to ask someone else to look at my emails - so you will just have to wait for an answer until I return. Tough!
  • It would make more sense to use the term 'annual leave' here in Spain, where a lot of firms close in August because of the heat. So staff have to take holidays then.
  • rb6acrb6ac Forumite
    611 Posts
    My out of office uses the phrase 'annual leave' due to the fact I use the same mobile for work and personal calls. My mobile number is shown on my e-mail signature, and so I use 'annual leave' rather than say "I'm not in the office at the moment" to deter people from contacting me on the mobile. Not just clients, but colleagues too. And, as JimmyTheWig says, it differentiates from other types of leave. x
  • No idea. Its what it says at the top of my holiday form.
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  • OblivionOblivion Forumite
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    I'm happily retired now so my annual leave is ..... errm .... annual :rotfl:

    Dave.
    ... Dave
    Happily retired and enjoying my 14th year of leisure
    I am cleverly disguised as a responsible adult.
    Bring me sunshine in your smile
  • OTTOOTTO Forumite
    38 Posts
    It's a polite way of saying any combination of the following in one sentence:

    "Leave me alone to enjoy my own free time"
    "Do not try to contact me"
    "I will not be replying to any emails, even though I may be monitoring them"
    "I am on a super holiday of a lifetime, but I dont want you to know that"
    "I'n not being paid to work, so get lost"

    Probably about 200 other lines that could be added, but they all can be summed up in one line.
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