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How do I make my washing smell scrumptious?

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Old Style MoneySaving
109 replies 74.7K views
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  • hohmhohm Forumite
    6 posts
    We had a problem with our clothes smelling a bit as we also live in a flat and dry our clothes on a clothes horse. Put about a cup of white vinegar in with the washing liquid or powder and you will never look back. Don't worry - the clothes will not smell like fish n chips! The vinegar neutralises the smell somehow and doesn't create any smell.

    We use Ecover liquid and fabric softener too, in case you're wondering.

    Seriously though... white vinegar - 1 cup(-ish) per full wash. You'll never look back.
  • Hi,

    i have found that having a dehumidifier on for a cple hrs during night helps dry items faster, keeps house warmer and prevents damp and associated problems

    Sandi
  • mamanmaman Forumite
    22.5K posts
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    I've just bought a new washing machine and want to avoid mould on the rubber door seal t as happened on my old one. I read in a magazine last week that this is caused because people do so much washing on 30/40 degree washes these days and this doesn't break down grease and bacteria.

    Advice was to 'Run the empty machine on the hottest wash cycle with a cup of clear vinegar. Do at least one wash a week on 60 degrees'

    This seems hugely extravagant to me but when I checked the labels on white underwear and sheets it says 40 degree wash. What do people put on a really hot wash these days?
  • MagentasueMagentasue Forumite
    4.2K posts
    maman wrote: »

    This seems hugely extravagant to me but when I checked the labels on white underwear and sheets it says 40 degree wash. What do people put on a really hot wash these days?

    Whites - shirts, towels, tea towels, dishcloths, hankies ...
  • LameWolfLameWolf Forumite
    11.1K posts
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    maman wrote: »
    I've just bought a new washing machine and want to avoid mould on the rubber door seal t as happened on my old one. I read in a magazine last week that this is caused because people do so much washing on 30/40 degree washes these days and this doesn't break down grease and bacteria.

    Advice was to 'Run the empty machine on the hottest wash cycle with a cup of clear vinegar. Do at least one wash a week on 60 degrees'

    This seems hugely extravagant to me but when I checked the labels on white underwear and sheets it says 40 degree wash. What do people put on a really hot wash these days?
    Hankies, towels and tea cloths.
    If your dog thinks you're the best, don't seek a second opinion.;)
  • troi78troi78 Forumite
    8 posts
    Soapnuts are great. I used them for ages. Like a few others, I detest the strong smell of powders and conditioners, plus I have a daughter with sensitive skin. If anyone passes on clothes for the kids, I have to wash them maybe twice to get the chemical smell out. I wonder why anyone would want to walk around smelling like that.

    At the moment I use a proprietory brand, usually from Aldi, but I use half the recommended amount, i.e one tablet instead of two. If using Bold or something, then I reduce the amount again. As I detest ironing and haven't done any for 6 years, my tumble dryer is my friend. I reckon not using the iron for a family of four must offset some of the cost of using the dryer, though with rising costs I might resurect my washing line for bedding and towels.

    I also use a 90 deg. wash every now and then, and wash things like husband's work clothes at 60 deg. after finding nasty stuff in the machine seal. Yuk.
  • I add about 1 teaspoon of dettol (the original one) to the fabric softener draw, with the fabric softener. It makes them smell like new baby when they dry and not dettoly at all.
  • TuesdayTuesday Forumite
    49 posts
    We've just had a baby and trying to dry washable nappies indoors takes days without any help...
    Suggest you try square terry nappies - folded into a pad they will fit any size of baby. Try a few different ways to fold e.g.
    1) Make a smaller square by putting each corner into the middle and then folding in 3
    2) Fold over 1/3 to make an oblong and then fold into 3
    As they're flat squares they dry much quicker than the pad or shaped nappies. I used them with ElliePants which are designed to use with terries.
    (I used terries for all my 4 babies and ElliePants on the last two).
  • lemmingslemmings Forumite
    5 posts
    I have the same problem in the past. I live in a bungalow and with all this wet weather it's been hard to dry things. I do have a TD but trying not to use it to save money on electricity bills.

    I have tried hanging washing from shower rail in the past and the rail broke! :confused:

    I think it needs to not be hanging around for too long - open windows to bring in air and take out air. Could also use a dehumidifier to get moisture out of air!
  • I used to used Tesco tabs, and although washing was clean (except for the odd white powder mark when I tried to wash @ 30) it smelt musty...

    I recently changed to tesco concentrated liquid (to try and get rid of the white marks) and my washing now smells LOVELY! Even when drying inside, (what British summer???) I can now smell nice washing drying rather than a musty smell!
    Debt April 2009: £13,228.91
    Debt July 2009: £11,084.82
    Debt free by 29th birthday (1 year and 3 months)

    Proud to be dealing with my debts
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