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  • FIRST POST
    • don_ky01
    • By don_ky01 6th Apr 08, 10:30 PM
    • 122Posts
    • 57Thanks
    don_ky01
    NO trickle vents in double glazing
    • #1
    • 6th Apr 08, 10:30 PM
    NO trickle vents in double glazing 6th Apr 08 at 10:30 PM
    I am experiencing some damp problems and through research have discovered that it is not rising damp or leaks but due to the nature of it 95% probability that it's caused by condensation within the house. I have double-glazing with wooden frames (These were installed prior to my arrival in the house) these do gather condensation on the inside; I suffer dampness on the walls. My research has informed me that I should have trickle vents in the frames, these don't exist!

    My question is can I drill the holes to vent the windows myself and if so what diameter hole should I drill in the frames? My guess is 3 - 4 mm and if this is the case, where would I get a long enough drill bit as the frame is 8cm thick and when you take in the extra required for the angle most standard drill bits won't be long enough.

    Suggestions please.
    Thanks
    don_ky01
Page 1
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 6th Apr 08, 10:46 PM
    • 21,716 Posts
    • 61,734 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #2
    • 6th Apr 08, 10:46 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Apr 08, 10:46 PM
    You could leave the window and drill a nice big hole through the wall instead and put a ventilation cover on both sides over the hole for neatness. esentially an 'air brick'

    Only windows fitted after a certain date would be required to have trickle vents.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
  • TimBuckTeeth
    • #3
    • 7th Apr 08, 2:45 AM
    • #3
    • 7th Apr 08, 2:45 AM
    I wouldn't just put some holes in the frame. Likely to get problems with water and wind noise. 3 or 4mm is too small to have much of an effect.

    In my UPVC windows there is rain deflector grill cover on the outside and a cover with a shutter on the inside. A slot about 10mm high is cut through the frame, and a few inches long - as long as the cover.

    Have a look to see if you can buy the covers/grills seperately then make a suitable slot. I would paint or varnish the inside of the slot to stop the wood rotting. Make sure the drill doesn't go anywhere near the edge of the glazing unit.

    It might be easier to put a separate vent somewhere else as mentioned above.
    If you have bad condensation then it might be best to start with an extractor fan in the kitchen and bathroom, and keep windows ajar, as trickle vents will only help a little.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 7th Apr 08, 1:34 PM
    • 33,582 Posts
    • 140,104 Thanks
    silvercar
    • #4
    • 7th Apr 08, 1:34 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Apr 08, 1:34 PM
    I had windows fitted last week with no trickle vents. Instead the locking mechanism allows the windows to be locked when open a few millimeters.

    All FENSA registered windows and installer, so perfectly legal.
  • lizziloves
    • #5
    • 9th Apr 08, 6:00 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Apr 08, 6:00 PM
    You can buy retro-fit trickle vents but they probably wouldnt look too great.

    You would probably be better off installing humidistat fans to kitchen and bathroom as they switch on when they humidity gets high.

    You could also look at how you heat the rooms which suffer condensation (constant temperature is better than temperature fluctuations) and consider increasing your loft insulation if you dont have much. Schemes such as Warm Front and schemes run by energy providers can sometimes help with the cost if you meet qualifying criteria.
  • macduf
    • #6
    • 10th Apr 08, 7:26 AM
    • #6
    • 10th Apr 08, 7:26 AM
    ]I had windows fitted last week with no trickle vents. Instead the locking mechanism allows the windows to be locked when open a few millimeters.

    All FENSA registered windows and installer, so perfectly legal.[/quote]

    I am certain that you require Trickle Vents in all Habitable rooms.
    The locking Mechanism is not designed for purely that reason although it helps. When it is in "night lock" position there is a Leverage point for someone to open any Windows so it would not be a good idea to leave downstairs windows in this position. I would asuggest you to call your Planning dept for advice.
    • Optimist
    • By Optimist 10th Apr 08, 7:42 AM
    • 4,422 Posts
    • 5,474 Thanks
    Optimist
    • #7
    • 10th Apr 08, 7:42 AM
    • #7
    • 10th Apr 08, 7:42 AM
    I had new windows put in by a Fensa registered installer and he said that he had no need to install trickle vents if the windows he was replacing did not have them.
    "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts."

    Bertrand Russell. British author, mathematician, & philosopher (1872 - 1970)
    • adandem
    • By adandem 10th Apr 08, 8:09 AM
    • 3,297 Posts
    • 4,527 Thanks
    adandem
    • #8
    • 10th Apr 08, 8:09 AM
    • #8
    • 10th Apr 08, 8:09 AM
    I had new windows just over a year ago and specifically asked not to have them.

    OP- If your house is that damp through condensation do you open your windows at all to ventiate, esp. in bathrooms and kitchens etc? I would get the matter investigated before doing anything.
  • elcappytan
    • #9
    • 28th Feb 11, 9:23 PM
    • #9
    • 28th Feb 11, 9:23 PM
    I had new windows put in by a Fensa registered installer and he said that he had no need to install trickle vents if the windows he was replacing did not have them.
    Originally posted by Optimist
    This changed with an update to Approved Document Part F (Building Regulations) in 2010. Trickle ventilation is required even if the windows being replaced did not have them.
    • cajef
    • By cajef 28th Feb 11, 9:30 PM
    • 4,004 Posts
    • 3,260 Thanks
    cajef
    'Optimist' posted that three years ago, why resurrect a three year old thread?
    I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
    • leveller2911
    • By leveller2911 28th Feb 11, 10:04 PM
    • 7,020 Posts
    • 12,273 Thanks
    leveller2911
    This changed with an update to Approved Document Part F (Building Regulations) in 2010. Trickle ventilation is required even if the windows being replaced did not have them.
    Originally posted by elcappytan

    Building inspectors can NO longer insist on trickle vents , I should know I make windows for a living and please don't dig up threads that are 3 years old, it just clutters the place up... Why would you trawl through 3years of threads just to post on one about trickle vents?

    Theres plenty of good reading all over the site you don't need to dig up old ones......... That is unless your going to post a website selling amazing trickle vents that don't let a gale in..

    Also what exactly is the point of a trickle vent ? if its to create an air flow and to assist with making a room breathe why can they be closed ??... Ive yet to come across any house in 25 years of work where people have them open......Total waste of money time and effort.. and they look hideous too......
    Last edited by leveller2911; 28-02-2011 at 10:09 PM.
    If we in parliament cannot gain from ruling,then there is very little point in us being here: (Lord Manchester 1650) :rolleyes: how true!
    • docmatt
    • By docmatt 28th Feb 11, 10:22 PM
    • 623 Posts
    • 296 Thanks
    docmatt
    • grimsalve
    • By grimsalve 1st Mar 11, 11:12 AM
    • 492 Posts
    • 319 Thanks
    grimsalve
    Have you considered Positive Input Ventilation?
  • angus1024
    trickle vents - where to fit?
    Hi
    I wish to fit trickle vents to my house as it has old PVC everywhere and no trickle vents.

    Does anyone know where to fit them - I've usually seen them on the opening top window flaps - but can you fit them in fixed non-opening windows or PVC doors do you know please?

    angus
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