IMPORTANT! This is MoneySavingExpert's open forum - anyone can post

Please exercise caution & report any spam, illegal, offensive, racist, libellous post to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com

  • Be nice to all MoneySavers
  • All the best tips go in the MoneySavingExpert weekly email

    Plus all the new guides, deals & loopholes

  • No spam/referral links
or Login with Facebook
Grow-your-own fresh yeast?
Reply
Views: 19,243
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
# 1
paddy's mum
Old 30-01-2008, 9:23 PM
Fantastically Fervent MoneySaving Super Fan
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: South Lincolnshire
Posts: 2,643
Smile Grow-your-own fresh yeast?

For some days, I've been mulling over whether or not it is possible to grow your own yeast. It occurred to me that if yeast is an organism that with the right growing conditions will multiply, it should be possible to do so. Has anybody else tried this?

With a cracking good woodburner (so therefore a constantly warm kitchen or alternatively the airing cupboard) nugget of fresh yeast to start, warm water and food (ie sugar) I might be able to keep a culture going well enough to avoid having to buy dried yeast, which I think is relatively expensive since much of the product is packaging.

I clearly remember an American friend once telling me that her g-g-grandmother had crossed the prairies as a pioneer and those women kept their 'starter' alive and prospering by stuffing the culture in a jar down their bodices! Certainly, bread has been a British staple for centuries, long before shops were invented, so how did our foremothers obtain yeast for baking?

Well .. I'm going to try it and let you know (you would like to know, wouldn't you?!) how I get on.

PS You guys would be brave/kind/foolish enough to tell me, if you think this is taking OS too far !
paddy's mum is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to paddy's mum For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 2
squeaky
Old 30-01-2008, 9:27 PM
Deliciously Dedicated Diehard MoneySaving Devotee
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Sunny Suffolk
Posts: 13,813
Send a message via MSN to squeaky
Default

This might be helpful then...

http://waltonfeed.com/old/yeast.html
Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
squeaky is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to squeaky For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 3
Jolaaled
Old 30-01-2008, 9:31 PM
Serious MoneySaving Fan
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 1,019
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by paddy's mum View Post
For some days, I've been mulling over whether or not it is possible to grow your own yeast. It occurred to me that if yeast is an organism that with the right growing conditions will multiply, it should be possible to do so. Has anybody else tried this?

With a cracking good woodburner (so therefore a constantly warm kitchen or alternatively the airing cupboard) nugget of fresh yeast to start, warm water and food (ie sugar) I might be able to keep a culture going well enough to avoid having to buy dried yeast, which I think is relatively expensive since much of the product is packaging.

I clearly remember an American friend once telling me that her g-g-grandmother had crossed the prairies as a pioneer and those women kept their 'starter' alive and prospering by stuffing the culture in a jar down their bodices! Certainly, bread has been a British staple for centuries, long before shops were invented, so how did our foremothers obtain yeast for baking?

Well .. I'm going to try it and let you know (you would like to know, wouldn't you?!) how I get on.

PS You guys would be brave/kind/foolish enough to tell me, if you think this is taking OS too far !
sounds an interesting project..good luck...i'll be watching out for news on how you go.
Don't forget, that you can get free yeast at tesco bakery, by just asking for some fresh yeast, from the staff at the bakery section. They usually give me loads.
Jolaaled is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
The Following User Says Thank You to Jolaaled For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 4
Angelina-M
Old 30-01-2008, 9:35 PM
Serious MoneySaving Fan
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,465
Default

I used to keep a sourdough starter going for breadmaking. I had to feed it flour and stir in water to keep it growing. The idea was you took some out to use in your bread and then fed the rest of it so it kept growing in your jam jar.

Nice idea but it stank so bad that I darent use it and eventually I killed it by stopping its supply of fresh flour..... sorry but it was for the best
Angelina-M is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Angelina-M For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 5
paddy's mum
Old 30-01-2008, 9:59 PM
Fantastically Fervent MoneySaving Super Fan
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: South Lincolnshire
Posts: 2,643
Default

Jehosophat - it's already going great guns!

About two minutes before I typed up the op, I put 14 fl ozs warm water in an empty six pinter plastic milk bottle (my favourite, and free, containers) added a generous two large tablespoons of sugar, two scant tablespoons of Allisons dried yeast, stirred until smooth. Popped a piece of kitchen towel over the opening, secured with an elastic band. The kitchen is currently at 78 degrees.

The thing is going like a time bomb! Some is froth but unless I've had too much vino with my supper or I need another specsavers appointment, the level of base fluid has already risen substantially.

I realise that I can use a miniscule amount when hand baking and just leave to fully prove, even if that is some hours. Next test - how much to use in my new (thanks to all you Panasonic devotees) breadmaker. That might be a bit hit-and-miss. Watch this space for my references to unleavened dropscones, pitta bread or "burbling out the top" ultra light and aerated bread
recipes!!!

Wish there was a way to talk to my own g-g-g-g grandmother. Those women must have so much to teach us that has been forgotten over the years.
paddy's mum is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
The Following User Says Thank You to paddy's mum For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 6
Gingernutmeg
Old 30-01-2008, 10:10 PM
Fantastically Fervent MoneySaving Super Fan
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 3,440
Default

I don't think that you'll be able to grow yeast that'll be the same as the commercial stuff you buy in a block. In effect, what you'll be doing is starting a yeast based sourdough culture which you'll need to divide and feed, and watch to make sure that it doesn't go off (you'll know by the smell, it should smell pleasantly sour, not make you gasp vinegary ). However I have heard of cultures like these going on for YEARS - I think there's one bakery in Switzerland somewhere that's using a culture that's descended from an original one started over a hundred years ago ... I hope you like lots of bread

I'm not sure either that this kind of culture will work *that* well in a breadmaker. I've had a go at a few and they're tricky to manage, they need careful handling in terms of temperature/amount of flour/amount of water etc and I've never had much luck using them 'mechanically'.

Gingernutmeg is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
The Following User Says Thank You to Gingernutmeg For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 7
annaangeluk
Old 30-01-2008, 10:18 PM
MoneySaving Stalwart
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Leeds
Posts: 444
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gingernutmeg View Post
However I have heard of cultures like these going on for YEARS - I think there's one bakery in Switzerland somewhere that's using a culture that's descended from an original one started over a hundred years ago ... .
God, can you imagine the b*llocking a member of staff would get for letting that die!! Bet there is no school leaver/apprentice allowed anywhere near it!!
Joined SW 24/02/2011 71lb/28.5lb
-6, -2.5, -2, -1, -2 -, -2 sow, +3 (holiday), -5.5 (*) +0.5, +1, -4, -0.5(*), -3(10%!!) +0.5, -3, -1, -1(2st)
annaangeluk is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to annaangeluk For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 8
paddy's mum
Old 30-01-2008, 10:23 PM
Fantastically Fervent MoneySaving Super Fan
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: South Lincolnshire
Posts: 2,643
Default

Well, I'm going to give it a go. If nothing else, my tribe of pet dogs like anything even remotely 'human grub' in their food bowls, and will thank me for a change of flavour. While they're eating that, I'm not paying out for expensive all-in-one commercial dried food.

I can see that it would be difficult to measure how much when using a breadmaker so thanks for that input, Gingernutmeg.

If nothing else, my 'biology' experiment may help someone else who is as tightfi .. sorry, as frugally minded as I am!
paddy's mum is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
The Following User Says Thank You to paddy's mum For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 9
Gingernutmeg
Old 30-01-2008, 10:25 PM
Fantastically Fervent MoneySaving Super Fan
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 3,440
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by annaangeluk View Post
God, can you imagine the b*llocking a member of staff would get for letting that die!! Bet there is no school leaver/apprentice allowed anywhere near it!!
I can just imagine!

Makes me laugh imagining the British Environmental Health Officer who would let that happen ... 'So when did you make this culture?' 'Oh, 1908ish' ...

Gingernutmeg is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Gingernutmeg For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 10
annaangeluk
Old 30-01-2008, 10:31 PM
MoneySaving Stalwart
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Leeds
Posts: 444
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gingernutmeg View Post
I can just imagine!

Makes me laugh imagining the British Environmental Health Officer who would let that happen ... 'So when did you make this culture?' 'Oh, 1908ish' ...
You can imagine the spotty 16 year old on work experience that just tipped it in the bin!! Realising what it was, nipping to Tesco to replace it!!
Joined SW 24/02/2011 71lb/28.5lb
-6, -2.5, -2, -1, -2 -, -2 sow, +3 (holiday), -5.5 (*) +0.5, +1, -4, -0.5(*), -3(10%!!) +0.5, -3, -1, -1(2st)
annaangeluk is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
The Following User Says Thank You to annaangeluk For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 11
Gingernutmeg
Old 30-01-2008, 10:38 PM
Fantastically Fervent MoneySaving Super Fan
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 3,440
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by paddy's mum View Post
Well, I'm going to give it a go. If nothing else, my tribe of pet dogs like anything even remotely 'human grub' in their food bowls, and will thank me for a change of flavour. While they're eating that, I'm not paying out for expensive all-in-one commercial dried food.

I can see that it would be difficult to measure how much when using a breadmaker so thanks for that input, Gingernutmeg.

If nothing else, my 'biology' experiment may help someone else who is as tightfi .. sorry, as frugally minded as I am!
If you can get it going well then I'm sure it'll be lovely. Breads made with these cultures tend to have lovely chewy crusts and great flavour that you just don't get much nowadays. There are some great websites for this kind of thing, and loads of tips - I was told that if you use mineral water it makes a better culture, as the chlorine in tap water can kill the yeasts, and apparently a proportion of rye flour mixed in when you refresh it gives a good flavour and can perk up a culture that's looking a bit tired. Organic flours are supposed to work well too, again because of the chemical issues. I gave mine up because it all gets too time consuming (and you have to make bread with it really regularly) but all this has made me think about starting one up again Apparently where you are can make a difference too, that's why San Francisco sourdough is so famous, because it's particular to that area because of the weather conditions etc.

Gingernutmeg is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
# 12
sticher
Old 31-01-2008, 2:44 PM
MoneySaving Stalwart
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 592
Default

Nice idea but it stank so bad that I darent use it and eventually I killed it by stopping its supply of fresh flour..... sorry but it was for the best

That really made me laugh.

I look forward to hearing how your bread turns out.
sticher is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
# 13
paddy's mum
Old 03-02-2008, 5:07 PM
Fantastically Fervent MoneySaving Super Fan
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: South Lincolnshire
Posts: 2,643
Default

It pongs already! Don't know what went wrong but I don't like the look of it. Might stick to the fast action dried in future so that at least when the Police come knocking, I know it's not me that poisoned hubby!

Thanks for all your comments. It was worth a try but think I'll have to admit defeat on this one.
paddy's mum is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
# 14
Angelina-M
Old 03-02-2008, 6:23 PM
Serious MoneySaving Fan
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,465
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by paddy's mum View Post
It pongs already! Don't know what went wrong but I don't like the look of it. Might stick to the fast action dried in future so that at least when the Police come knocking, I know it's not me that poisoned hubby!

Thanks for all your comments. It was worth a try but think I'll have to admit defeat on this one.
No dont chuck it. It does stink... its supposed to!!

You could always try it with one loaf. Make a nice sourdough bread and report back?
Angelina-M is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
The Following User Says Thank You to Angelina-M For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 15
123-artee
Old 15-09-2010, 5:04 PM
MoneySaving Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1
Default grow your own yeast

If you feed sugar or starch to yeast all you get is ethanol and CO2, and when the level of ethanol is high enough the yeast is killed - this is what brewers of wine and beer do. To multiply your yeast what you need to do is supply it with food and keep out oxygen (which encourages the smelly sourdough type bacteria to grow) .. yeast is a fungus like plant that likes Nitrogen, Potassium and Phosphorus plus a trace of Magnesium and Sulphur ... professional brewers and bakers supply their yeasts with tiny amounts of simple inorganic fertilizers - Ammonium Phosphate, Potassium Phosphate, Magnesium Sulphate plus a few trace vitamins - if you cannot source these you could substitute any mix of fertilizer compounds that are also permissible food additives such as Potassium Nitrate ... but the simplest is to buy a $1 packet of yeast nutrient from a home brew shop which will keep you going for years if you also add a small amount of sugar to the mix - this kills off some of the yeasts ... which the other yeasts then consume as food ... and the layer of CO2 above the mix keeps out the oxygen which the bacteria need.
123-artee is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
# 16
Scrimgeour
Old 09-04-2011, 2:01 PM
MoneySaving Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 1
Default "making" yeast

Some in this thread were asking how our ggg... grandmothers got yeast to make bread. I read a book a few months ago called Roughing it in the Bush or Forest Life in Canada by Susanna Moodie, written around 1825. The following is what she wrote about making “bran emptyings” to leaven bread:

put a double handful of bran into a small pot, or kettle, but a jug will do, and a teaspoon of salt; but mind you don't kill it with salt, for if you do, it won't rise. I then add as much warm water, at blood heat, as will mix it into a stiff batter. I then put the jug into a pan of warm water, and set it on the hearth near the fire, and keep it at the same heat until it rises, which it generally will do, if you attend to it, in two or three hours' time. When the bran cracks at the top, and you see white bubbles rising through it, you may strain it into your flour, and lay your bread. It makes good bread.


She mentioned “milk emptyings” can give a sour taste to the bread. She didn't describe how to make them though, other than by mixing milk and flour. I gather from these descriptions that the “emptyings” were colonised by wild yeasts. Not all wild yeasts will raise bread though, so I would follow the earlier recommendations for growing store bought yeasts.

Some people were also asking how much fresh yeast to use in bread. I found a breadmaker recipe which uses fresh yeast (and gives an amount!) here: www(dot)Suite101(dot)com/content/easy-and-healthy-bread-maker-recipe-using-fresh-yeast-a274370. I just registered to post this reply, so I can't post a proper link yet.

Good luck!
Scrimgeour is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
The Following User Says Thank You to Scrimgeour For This Useful Post: Show me >>
# 17
tryingtoruletheworld
Old 09-04-2011, 8:01 PM
MoneySaving Stalwart
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 312
Default

I like to make rye sour dough bread and the sour does keep forever! I guess that is one of the original ways of making your own yeast. You just have to keep renewing it by putting it all into your next fresh production sour, then remove some to keep on again before you make the final loaf. You can also keep it in the freezer, it loses a little potentcy but a quick refreshment usually does the trick.
tryingtoruletheworld is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
# 18
bellabee
Old 07-11-2012, 8:38 AM
MoneySaving Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 1
Default

What happened I am on the edge of my seat, considering growing yeast myself. x
bellabee is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
# 19
neesha64
Old 10-02-2014, 10:01 PM
MoneySaving Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 123-artee View Post
If you feed sugar or starch to yeast all you get is ethanol and CO2, and when the level of ethanol is high enough the yeast is killed - this is what brewers of wine and beer do. To multiply your yeast what you need to do is supply it with food and keep out oxygen (which encourages the smelly sourdough type bacteria to grow) .. yeast is a fungus like plant that likes Nitrogen, Potassium and Phosphorus plus a trace of Magnesium and Sulphur ... professional brewers and bakers supply their yeasts with tiny amounts of simple inorganic fertilizers - Ammonium Phosphate, Potassium Phosphate, Magnesium Sulphate plus a few trace vitamins - if you cannot source these you could substitute any mix of fertilizer compounds that are also permissible food additives such as Potassium Nitrate ... but the simplest is to buy a $1 packet of yeast nutrient from a home brew shop which will keep you going for years if you also add a small amount of sugar to the mix - this kills off some of the yeasts ... which the other yeasts then consume as food ... and the layer of CO2 above the mix keeps out the oxygen which the bacteria need.
Just thought I should add some corrections here from my knowledge of biology. Yeast can respire aerobically (with oxygen) or anaerobically (without oxygen). In the presence of oxgen, aerobic respiration will breakdown glucose into carbon dioxide and water. This is the more efficient process and will lead to yeast cell growth and reproduction if other conditions are also favourable. If you want to grow yeast, then provide it with oxygen. Anaerobic respiration produces ethanol and carbon dioxide and is only viable for the yeast for short time. Look up the Pasteur effect if you're interested.
I keep a starter for bread-making in a small bowl in the fridge made from packet dried yeast, white flour and water. Just put half in each batch of bread and make up the starter volume with more flour and water. Lasts indefinitely if used two or three times a week. I add a little dried yeast to the batch too (about half the usual amount). Saves on yeast and improves the texture of the bread.
neesha64 is offline
Reply With Quote Report Post
The Following User Says Thank You to neesha64 For This Useful Post: Show me >>
Reply

Bookmarks
 
 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 Forum Jump  

Contact Us - MoneySavingExpert.com - Archive - Privacy Statement - Top

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:50 AM.

 Forum Jump  

Free MoneySaving Email

Top deals: Week of 03 September 2014

Get all this & more in MoneySavingExpert's weekly email full of guides, vouchers and Deals

GET THIS FREE WEEKLY EMAIL Full of deals, guides & it's spam free

Latest News & Blogs

Martin's Twitter Feed

profile
  • My point is less the rights and wrongs, more the tragic irony of the juxtaposition between the two.
  • We fail to intervene when 1,400 girls are sexually abused, but do intervene to imprison family trying to get treatment for their sick son.
  • Do you still print out your photos - PLEASE VOTE http://t.co/apAHZuhdIy

Cheap Travel Money

Find the best online rate for holiday cash with MSE's TravelMoneyMax.

Find the best online rate for your holiday cash with MoneySavingExpert's TravelMoneyMax.

TuneChecker Top Albums

  • ED SHEERANX (DELUXE EDITION)
  • VARIOUS ARTISTSNOW THAT'S WHAT I CALL MUSIC! 88
  • SAM SMITHIN THE LONELY HOUR (DELUXE EDITION)

MSE's Twitter Feed

profile
Always remember anyone can post on the MSE forums, so it can be very different from our opinion.
We use Skimlinks and other affiliated links in some of our boards, for some of our users.