Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    Joey122
    Borrowing Against My Pension Plan
    • #1
    • 1st Nov 07, 12:26 AM
    Borrowing Against My Pension Plan 1st Nov 07 at 12:26 AM
    I m 27 and quite fortunate to be earning a decent salary ~ 50K.

    The company I work for contributes 5K to my pension and I am entitled to add to that if I want.

    My plan is as follows:

    1) For the next 20 years , any income over 37K will be put into a pension thus reducing my tax liability as I get 40% tax relief on this. Is this correct BTW.

    I figure that in five / ten years time I will have a large pension pot- Can I borrow against this collateral if I choose? I would have thought I could as its an asset and can be secured against it

    Ideas?
Page 1
    • mystic_trev
    • By mystic_trev 1st Nov 07, 1:14 AM
    • 4,984 Posts
    • 14,639 Thanks
    mystic_trev
    • #2
    • 1st Nov 07, 1:14 AM
    • #2
    • 1st Nov 07, 1:14 AM
    In short - NO. Although you can borrow against it to 'gear' your Pension Investments if the Pensions in a SIPP.


    http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/money/pensions/article2752263.ece
  • Joey122
    • #3
    • 1st Nov 07, 1:25 AM
    • #3
    • 1st Nov 07, 1:25 AM
    Under what circumstances can you unwind a pension ? Is it only death?

    Thanks
  • Retired I.F.A.
    • #4
    • 1st Nov 07, 5:01 AM
    • #4
    • 1st Nov 07, 5:01 AM
    A pension plan cannot legally be assigned so although you can borrow against it the lender cannot have any say in it's ownership, it's underlying investment,the retirement date nor can they be a beneficiary. So whatever sort it is is irrelevent.

    By "unwind" what do you mean?
  • jonathon_hart
    • #5
    • 1st Nov 07, 1:01 PM
    • #5
    • 1st Nov 07, 1:01 PM
    Once you have been in an occupational pension plan (which I am assuming yours is) for 2 years then the only way to get the money out is to retire or die.
    I have worked for 5 years as a Pension Administrator and then a further year in a non-administrator pension role. I am not (and never have been) an adviser. Do not take anything I say as advice, it is information given on the best of my knowledge.
  • EdInvestor
    • #6
    • 1st Nov 07, 1:30 PM
    • #6
    • 1st Nov 07, 1:30 PM
    Can I borrow against this collateral if I choose? I would have thought I could as its an asset and can be secured against it
    Originally posted by Joey122

    Borrowing against pensions is usually limited to the projected value of the 25% tax free cash - as with "pension mortgages" of old.This is because the rest of the money can only be extracted from the pension in the form of a restricted income stream, and thus couldn't be used to repay a lump sum debt.

    Given the abject failure of pension mortgages following the inability of the pension funds to meet their projected values in recent years, it wouldn't be surprising if lenders insisted on a margin for error on such borrowing these days.
  • LookingForCasf
    • #7
    • 3rd Nov 10, 2:39 PM
    Can I Borrow from a SIPP
    • #7
    • 3rd Nov 10, 2:39 PM
    I am an individual. I have a SIPP (ALL CASH). I need cash now. Can I borrow from this SIPP.

    If NOT, is it possible to transfer to another type of vehicle and borrow against that?
    • Andy L
    • By Andy L 3rd Nov 10, 3:08 PM
    • 7,455 Posts
    • 5,515 Thanks
    Andy L
    • #8
    • 3rd Nov 10, 3:08 PM
    • #8
    • 3rd Nov 10, 3:08 PM
    I am an individual. I have a SIPP (ALL CASH). I need cash now. Can I borrow from this SIPP.

    If NOT, is it possible to transfer to another type of vehicle and borrow against that?
    Originally posted by LookingForCasf
    Assuming you are under 55 then no and no
  • mitchaa
    • #9
    • 3rd Nov 10, 3:24 PM
    • #9
    • 3rd Nov 10, 3:24 PM
    I m 27 and quite fortunate to be earning a decent salary ~ 50K.

    The company I work for contributes 5K to my pension and I am entitled to add to that if I want.

    My plan is as follows:

    1) For the next 20 years , any income over 37K will be put into a pension thus reducing my tax liability as I get 40% tax relief on this. Is this correct BTW.
    Originally posted by Joey122
    Any income over £44k is taxed at 40% so if you can and you want to avoid 40% taxation, put the £6k remainder into your pension fund.

    • Loughton Monkey
    • By Loughton Monkey 3rd Nov 10, 10:50 PM
    • 8,707 Posts
    • 12,428 Thanks
    Loughton Monkey
    1) For the next 20 years , any income over 37K will be put into a pension thus reducing my tax liability as I get 40% tax relief on this. Is this correct BTW.

    I figure that in five / ten years time I will have a large pension pot- Can I borrow against this collateral if I choose? I would have thought I could as its an asset and can be secured against it
    Originally posted by Joey122
    You have already been told that you cannot realistically borrow against your pension plan. I would add that this would be rather a shortsighted thing to do in any case, although 'it takes all sorts'!

    You are asking about the strategy of saving in the pension only to the extent of top rate relief. Certainly this might make some sense now, but also you may (hopefully!) earn even more in real terms and might get to the stage where you breach the £50K annual limit. At this stage - if it arises - I wonder if you might regret not having 'filled' previous years' allowances - even at 20% tax relief?

    Remember that "Retirement Planning" is the important thing. Making sure you can answer the question "What am I going to live on when I retire?". or "What sort of (cost of) Lifestyle do I want when I retire". Perceived wisdom says that pensions are an extremely good vehicle for retirement funding - partticular with higher rate relief.

    But there are also other valid additional vehicles such as ISA's (£10K+ a year) and investing well and significantly in property (even on own residence - particularly if you want to downsize and release equity later on).

    Put simply, if you live your life "well within your means", and invest 'hard' in a range of vehicles such as Pensions, ISA's and Property, then you should be able to continue your lifestyle well into retirement. Mortgages excepted, borrowing in any other form should not be done without significant deliberate and intelligent consideration.

    Good luck.
  • iamana1ias
    This thread is 3 years old!!!
    I was born too late, into a world that doesn't care
    Oh I wish I was a punk rocker with flowers in my hair
    • Loughton Monkey
    • By Loughton Monkey 4th Nov 10, 12:28 AM
    • 8,707 Posts
    • 12,428 Thanks
    Loughton Monkey
    This thread is 3 years old!!!
    Originally posted by iamana1ias
    Thanks. Too stupid to notice that it was revived due to new Q.

    I'm going to have a nice lie down!
    • Rainmaker_uk
    • By Rainmaker_uk 4th Nov 10, 12:33 AM
    • 514 Posts
    • 676 Thanks
    Rainmaker_uk
    This thread is 3 years old!!!
    Originally posted by iamana1ias
    Yes but there was a new OP half way through!
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim's to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

238Posts Today

1,795Users online

Martin's Twitter