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    • marjrie
    • By marjrie 3rd Feb 18, 1:58 PM
    • 156Posts
    • 132Thanks
    marjrie
    Lower rate attendance allowance
    • #1
    • 3rd Feb 18, 1:58 PM
    Lower rate attendance allowance 3rd Feb 18 at 1:58 PM
    My husband gets attendance allowance at the lower rate, he has received this for about 8 years, he is 84 years old.
    He was awarded this as he needs help in the night, to get in and out of bed several times. He has severe arthritis
    Much of day to day life is a struggle, getting dressed takes an age, I have to help with everything.
    Remind him to have a drink often enough, he could just about make some toast, but not prepare a meal. He can't fasten buttons or tie laces, his fingers are so bad.
    Our son says we should apply for the higher rate Attendance Allowance, my worry is they say no and we loose the lower rate we have now.
    Any advice from here would be very welcome
Page 1
    • pmlindyloo
    • By pmlindyloo 3rd Feb 18, 2:16 PM
    • 11,132 Posts
    • 13,049 Thanks
    pmlindyloo
    • #2
    • 3rd Feb 18, 2:16 PM
    • #2
    • 3rd Feb 18, 2:16 PM
    It sounds as if he might now be eligible for a higher rate.

    AgeUK can advise and if they have a local support group may be able to give your husband a home visit where they will help with this.

    So, give them a call:

    https://www.ageuk.org.uk/services/age-uk-advice-line/

    If they cannot help with local support ask for your nearest support agency (CAB for example)
    • marjrie
    • By marjrie 3rd Feb 18, 3:34 PM
    • 156 Posts
    • 132 Thanks
    marjrie
    • #3
    • 3rd Feb 18, 3:34 PM
    • #3
    • 3rd Feb 18, 3:34 PM
    I'm worried he might loose what he already gets, I've read about how difficult it can be to go up to the higher rate.
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 3rd Feb 18, 3:44 PM
    • 1,266 Posts
    • 1,552 Thanks
    NeilCr
    • #4
    • 3rd Feb 18, 3:44 PM
    • #4
    • 3rd Feb 18, 3:44 PM
    I'm worried he might loose what he already gets, I've read about how difficult it can be to go up to the higher rate.
    Originally posted by marjrie
    Than go and have a chat with AgeUK/CAB/local support group who will be able to give you a fresh pair of eyes and the benefit of their experience.

    No-one will be able to tell you for definite what the result will be but you can talk it through with them and get a reasonable idea . Given what you have said I’d have thought it unlikely that the lower rate would be taken away and, as the excellent pmlindyloo says, he might have a reasonable shot at the higher rate

    Good luck
    • xylophone
    • By xylophone 3rd Feb 18, 8:38 PM
    • 24,533 Posts
    • 14,380 Thanks
    xylophone
    • #5
    • 3rd Feb 18, 8:38 PM
    • #5
    • 3rd Feb 18, 8:38 PM
    https://www.carersuk.org/help-and-advice/financial-support/help-with-benefits/attendance-allowance

    To satisfy the night-time test you need to show that you reasonably need either one of the following:

    help with personal care at least twice a night, or once a night for at least 20 minutes
    someone to check on you at least twice a night, or once a night for at least 20 minutes, to make sure that you are safe
    • marjrie
    • By marjrie 7th Feb 18, 4:12 PM
    • 156 Posts
    • 132 Thanks
    marjrie
    • #6
    • 7th Feb 18, 4:12 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Feb 18, 4:12 PM
    https://www.carersuk.org/help-and-advice/financial-support/help-with-benefits/attendance-allowance

    To satisfy the night-time test you need to show that you reasonably need either one of the following:

    help with personal care at least twice a night, or once a night for at least 20 minutes
    someone to check on you at least twice a night, or once a night for at least 20 minutes, to make sure that you are safe
    Originally posted by xylophone
    He needs help getting in and out of bed at least 3 times a night, this is what he gets the lower rate for.
    I now need to help him more and more each day, making sure he drinks enough, helping to dress and lots of things.
    I'm concerned if we apply for the higher rate they may stop it all completely. I've heard of this happening and we struggle financially as it is.
    • Penitent
    • By Penitent 7th Feb 18, 4:32 PM
    • 2,055 Posts
    • 6,223 Thanks
    Penitent
    • #7
    • 7th Feb 18, 4:32 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Feb 18, 4:32 PM
    You keep repeating that you're scared of losing the current award, but no-one here can tell you for certain what will happen after he's assessed, so you have to decide for yourself whether you're willing to take that risk.

    I can only repeat what's been said above: speak to Age UK or CAB before you make a decision and if you do decide to go forward, get help with the forms to give him the best chance of success.
    • marjrie
    • By marjrie 7th Feb 18, 4:48 PM
    • 156 Posts
    • 132 Thanks
    marjrie
    • #8
    • 7th Feb 18, 4:48 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Feb 18, 4:48 PM
    You keep repeating that you're scared of losing the current award, but no-one here can tell you for certain what will happen after he's assessed, so you have to decide for yourself whether you're willing to take that risk.

    I can only repeat what's been said above: speak to Age UK or CAB before you make a decision and if you do decide to go forward, get help with the forms to give him the best chance of success.
    Originally posted by Penitent
    I hope when you are elderly and looking for some help or reassurance you find someone polite and patient to advise you.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 7th Feb 18, 4:51 PM
    • 28,835 Posts
    • 73,644 Thanks
    Mojisola
    • #9
    • 7th Feb 18, 4:51 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Feb 18, 4:51 PM
    You keep repeating that you're scared of losing the current award, but no-one here can tell you for certain what will happen after he's assessed, so you have to decide for yourself whether you're willing to take that risk.

    I can only repeat what's been said above: speak to Age UK or CAB before you make a decision and if you do decide to go forward, get help with the forms to give him the best chance of success.
    Originally posted by Penitent
    I hope when you are elderly and looking for some help or reassurance you find someone polite and patient to advise you.
    Originally posted by marjrie
    That's not very fair. Penitent has given good advice - no-one could possibly know the answer to your question.

    Either stay as you are or get advice and apply for the higher rate.

    Have you and your husband been assessed by social services - him for care needs; you as a carer?
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 7th Feb 18, 4:53 PM
    • 1,266 Posts
    • 1,552 Thanks
    NeilCr
    I hope when you are elderly and looking for some help or reassurance you find someone polite and patient to advise you.
    Originally posted by marjrie
    Who you may well find at CAB or AgeUK.

    I have a lot of sympathy for your situation but I honestly do not really know what you are looking for from this forum. No-one can tell you for certain what will happen if you do apply for the higher rate.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 7th Feb 18, 5:04 PM
    • 28,835 Posts
    • 73,644 Thanks
    Mojisola
    My husband gets attendance allowance at the lower rate, he has received this for about 8 years, he is 84 years old.
    Originally posted by marjrie
    If he did National Service (or any other military service), you could ask SSAFA for help with making a claim. They were a lot of help to my parents.
    • Penitent
    • By Penitent 7th Feb 18, 5:38 PM
    • 2,055 Posts
    • 6,223 Thanks
    Penitent
    I hope when you are elderly and looking for some help or reassurance you find someone polite and patient to advise you.
    Originally posted by marjrie
    I'm honestly not sure what just happened. I've reread my post and I can't see the part that was impolite. I was trying to help you reach a solution to your problem.

    I have OCD, so I tend to obsess and repeat myself and sometimes struggle to move forward. I thought I was helping you recognise that you were caught in a similar loop that was preventing you moving forward.
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 7th Feb 18, 6:07 PM
    • 1,266 Posts
    • 1,552 Thanks
    NeilCr
    I'm honestly not sure what just happened. I've reread my post and I can't see the part that was impolite. I was trying to help you reach a solution to your problem.

    I have OCD, so I tend to obsess and repeat myself and sometimes struggle to move forward. I thought I was helping you recognise that you were caught in a similar loop that was preventing you moving forward.
    Originally posted by Penitent
    It is not you Penitent. Please do not worry about it.

    I read it and saw nothing impolite there -and I am pretty sure others will think the same.
    • w06
    • By w06 7th Feb 18, 6:12 PM
    • 445 Posts
    • 701 Thanks
    w06
    agreed

    Op, it's a risk that you have to decide whether to take.

    If you think that your husband should qualify for the higher rate and you can be sure that he'd still qualify for hte lower rate then consider applying.

    Conversely if you think that perhaps he doesn't qualify for the lower rate anymore, then you also need to tell them.
    • SandraScarlett
    • By SandraScarlett 7th Feb 18, 6:46 PM
    • 3,913 Posts
    • 28,729 Thanks
    SandraScarlett
    Like others, I can only say that with the amount of care you are currently giving, it is unlikely that your Lower Rate would be take away, and very likely that you would get the Higher Rate.


    The key to all this is filling in the forms, which are very lengthy, and some of the questions seem similar. But it is vital to give as much information as you can. Even if things seem trivial, it is still important to write every single thing down.


    The person who makes the decision, doesn't know the claimant, and can only make an assumption, based on the information in the form. For example, somebody may be unable to make themselves a meal, or even a drink, because they have severe arthritis, and cannot cut, peel, slice, lift or unscrew things.


    Rather than write "I need help", it is important to give the reasons as to why that help is needed, and if the person claiming is unable to complete the form themselves, it is quite acceptable to write both on the form, and on a covering letter, that you are writing this on their behalf, because they are unable to do so.


    Hope this helps.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 7th Feb 18, 6:53 PM
    • 28,835 Posts
    • 73,644 Thanks
    Mojisola
    he needs help in the night, to get in and out of bed several times. He has severe arthritis

    Much of day to day life is a struggle, getting dressed takes an age, I have to help with everything.

    Remind him to have a drink often enough, he could just about make some toast, but not prepare a meal. He can't fasten buttons or tie laces, his fingers are so bad.
    Originally posted by marjrie
    It's easy to feel overwhelmed as your husband's needs increase and sometimes it feels easier to keep struggling on rather than take chances on making things worse. With you being up several times in the night with him, you must be exhausted.

    You may well be entitled to some help from carers as well as the higher rate of AA.

    Please follow up the advice and get help filling in the forms and ask for assessments for you both.

    If you don't make time for yourself to rest well, you will become ill.
    • poppy12345
    • By poppy12345 7th Feb 18, 7:10 PM
    • 2,095 Posts
    • 1,984 Thanks
    poppy12345
    I hope when you are elderly and looking for some help or reassurance you find someone polite and patient to advise you.
    Originally posted by marjrie
    I'm not entirely sure what part of Penitent's post you found impolite but i thought it was good advice. Penitent always gives great advice like many others here.

    If you had great advice from many people, maybe you should take some of that on board.
    • Alice Holt
    • By Alice Holt 7th Feb 18, 7:48 PM
    • 1,780 Posts
    • 1,989 Thanks
    Alice Holt
    It is not you Penitent. Please do not worry about it.

    I read it and saw nothing impolite there -and I am pretty sure others will think the same.
    Originally posted by NeilCr
    Totally agree.
    A very surprising comment from the OP.

    From the OP's posts it would seem the Higher Rate (needing help with personal care needs both day and night) would be appropriate, and a withdraw of the current award very unlikely.
    But no-one can tell her what the DWP decision maker will decide. She has to make her own judgement.

    If she does decide to apply for a supersession:
    https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/benefits/benefits-introduction/problems-with-benefits-and-tax-credits/challenging-a-benefit-decision/challenging-a-dwp-benefit-decision-on-or-after-28-october-2013/changing-a-benefit-decision-by-revision-and-supersession/changing-a-dwp-benefit-decision-by-supersession/
    then as others have suggested she should get advice / help to complete the form:
    https://www.ageuk.org.uk/information-advice/money-legal/benefits-entitlements/disability-living-allowance/
    A letter from her husbands GP or other health care professional summarising his care needs would be helpful.
    • Penitent
    • By Penitent 7th Feb 18, 7:48 PM
    • 2,055 Posts
    • 6,223 Thanks
    Penitent
    I'm not entirely sure what part of Penitent's post you found impolite but i thought it was good advice. Penitent always gives great advice like many others here.

    If you had great advice from many people, maybe you should take some of that on board.
    Originally posted by poppy12345
    I wouldn't go that far. I have my lucid moments.
    • poppy12345
    • By poppy12345 7th Feb 18, 8:24 PM
    • 2,095 Posts
    • 1,984 Thanks
    poppy12345
    I wouldn't go that far. I have my lucid moments.
    Originally posted by Penitent
    We all do but i didn't see anything wrong in the comment you made for the OP to say what they said.
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