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  • FIRST POST
    • therivierakid
    • By therivierakid 17th Oct 07, 12:32 PM
    • 307Posts
    • 65Thanks
    therivierakid
    Becoming a private tutor- all questions here
    • #1
    • 17th Oct 07, 12:32 PM
    Becoming a private tutor- all questions here 17th Oct 07 at 12:32 PM
    I'd like to earn some extra income by doing some maths tutoring. I have a maths degree and a masters degree in another subject. I also helped my sister through her maths A-level.

    Does anyone have any advice or recommendations as to what I should do, how much to charge, where to advertise, whether I should get any further training...

    TIA

    Last edited by Former MSE Natasha; 30-10-2007 at 7:16 PM.
Page 1
  • foreversomeday
    • #2
    • 17th Oct 07, 1:47 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Oct 07, 1:47 PM
    If you're planning on working with children it's always a good idea to get a CRB check done, which proves you have no convictions which might put a child at risk - unfortunately it doesn't seem that you can get one done yourself. Perhaps you could start off with an agency?

    Ask at a local school for advice too!
    I don't believe and I never did that two wrongs make a right
  • dmg24
    • #3
    • 17th Oct 07, 1:54 PM
    • #3
    • 17th Oct 07, 1:54 PM
    An agency would ask for some sort of teaching experience (though not necessarily a PGCE).

    I tutor students up to GCSE (I am currently studying towards my PGCE), and have got my students through recommendation. Because I am gaining experience as well as helping the student, I only charge £5 an hour. However, this is supplemented by endless gifts from the students - one always brings me Ben and Jerrys and a magazine! x
    • therivierakid
    • By therivierakid 17th Oct 07, 2:36 PM
    • 307 Posts
    • 65 Thanks
    therivierakid
    • #4
    • 17th Oct 07, 2:36 PM
    • #4
    • 17th Oct 07, 2:36 PM
    Thanks. I'll look and see if there's any agencies who are hiring.

    dmg, are you studying for your PGCE part-time? I'm also interested in a career change and I've been thinking about going into adult education.
  • Ystrad Lad
    • #5
    • 17th Oct 07, 2:52 PM
    • #5
    • 17th Oct 07, 2:52 PM
    £5 an hour!!!!!!!!!!!

    Don't sell yourself short £18 -£20 is the going rate.

    Enhanced CRB checks are essential though, I wouldn't let a stranger teach my kids without one. If you do any part time teaching/lecturing, the school or college will get one (eventually).
  • annie123
    • #6
    • 17th Oct 07, 3:22 PM
    • #6
    • 17th Oct 07, 3:22 PM
    When my son asked for a maths tutor I used our local paper paid £6 per hour if you booked 10 hours or £8.50 if single hours. I spoke to several people before deciding on one. Got names from our local paper.

    A friend works for an agency teaching French to A level. They take a third of the hourly rate, so she tries to find students privatly... works out better for her.
  • barnaby-bear
    • #7
    • 17th Oct 07, 3:23 PM
    • #7
    • 17th Oct 07, 3:23 PM
    £5 an hour!!!!!!!!!!!

    Don't sell yourself short £18 -£20 is the going rate.

    Enhanced CRB checks are essential though, I wouldn't let a stranger teach my kids without one. If you do any part time teaching/lecturing, the school or college will get one (eventually).
    Originally posted by Ystrad Lad
    I charge £30 per hour and I'm not charging more than anyone else in the area - a prestigious university and higher degree helps, London it can be up to £40 - I don't do too much though too little time but once you get one you'll get half a dozen from the same school knocking at your door... stick to one school if you can - one syllabus to keep changing... after the first month I did this I've consistently had to turn far more down than I accept or Mrs. BB would tolerate :rolleyes: I'm only prepared to do it in a family area in the parental home with parents there - some people will suggest you go upstairs with their 15 yr old daughter so they can watch the telly - don't. Agencies take around 30% in my experience - good way to start.
  • bucksliz
    • #8
    • 17th Oct 07, 6:15 PM
    • #8
    • 17th Oct 07, 6:15 PM
    If you live in an area where the 11 plus is still around you can charge £25-£35 per hour just to 'babysit' the children whist they sit past papers. You can download the papers on-line and take several children at once. I know of a tutor locally who takes up to 10 at a time (all at the above rates) Our head teacher at the local primary says that's where she's going when she retires. There's money to be made out there!
    • scorpianking02
    • By scorpianking02 17th Oct 07, 10:07 PM
    • 302 Posts
    • 28 Thanks
    scorpianking02
    • #9
    • 17th Oct 07, 10:07 PM
    • #9
    • 17th Oct 07, 10:07 PM
    I have a maths degree and a masters degree in another subject.
    Originally posted by therivierakid
    Cool. Which uni did you go to? What was the other subject?
  • jamtart6
    I'm pretty fluent in French and have an A-Level in it and kept it up since. In fact I'm good at speaking, good at grammar, good at listening, its just sitting the bloomin exams that I seem to be naff at (I am gutted with my C at A-Level but have an A* GCSE) reckon this would be any good to tutor??

    Also got a degree in geography - reckon there is much call for tutors? probably not

    Being Thrifty Gifty again this year


    • therivierakid
    • By therivierakid 18th Oct 07, 7:27 AM
    • 307 Posts
    • 65 Thanks
    therivierakid
    Cool. Which uni did you go to? What was the other subject?
    Originally posted by scorpianking02
    Maths at Warwick. Manufacturing at Cranfield.
  • full-time-mum
    I'm pretty fluent in French and have an A-Level in it and kept it up since. In fact I'm good at speaking, good at grammar, good at listening, its just sitting the bloomin exams that I seem to be naff at (I am gutted with my C at A-Level but have an A* GCSE) reckon this would be any good to tutor??

    Also got a degree in geography - reckon there is much call for tutors? probably not
    Originally posted by jamtart6
    I believe that primary schools are going to have to provide some foreign language teaching in the not too distant future. If you have some spare time, and could volunteer for a bit, lots of schools would jump at the chance to supplement their PPA cover costs with a bit of free french tuition and you would then have some experience when the jobs became available.
    My DD did about 5 lessons of spanish in year 5 and 5 lessons of french in year 6 as a taster.

    There are also French classes in our area provided by a franchise (I think) called La Jolle Rounde. No idea what the criteria are or the costs but the site might be worth a look.
  • dmg24
    Thanks. I'll look and see if there's any agencies who are hiring.

    dmg, are you studying for your PGCE part-time? I'm also interested in a career change and I've been thinking about going into adult education.
    Originally posted by therivierakid
    Sorry so long to reply, yes, I am doing the PGCE part time at Nottingham.

    Ystrad, by charging £5 an hour I am keeping it as an informal arrangement. Therefore I do not need to pay tax, NI, public liability insurance etc. The people that I tutor would not be able to afford £15, and if I was paying that much, I would expect the tutor to have a teaching qualification.

    It really is down to personal choice as to what you charge. I work with the children of friends, and by charging less I get much more back in return - gifts (ice cream!), nights out paid for etc.

    The primary reason why I do it is because I love working with children. No matter how skilled you are in an area, please do not even consider tutoring if you do not enjoy being around children.
  • full-time-mum
    No matter how skilled you are in an area, please do not even consider tutoring if you do not enjoy being around children.
    Originally posted by dmg24
    Very sound advice.
    Last edited by full-time-mum; 19-10-2007 at 3:21 PM.
    • scorpianking02
    • By scorpianking02 19th Oct 07, 5:21 PM
    • 302 Posts
    • 28 Thanks
    scorpianking02
    Maths at Warwick.
    Originally posted by therivierakid
    Wow. You must be flippin' clever. Why do you want to tutour? You should have some great options (as long as you got 2:1 + )
  • Merlin-the-hound
    The PGCE has now been changed to Petles and Kettles? Er...no idea what the letters are - either way the course is the same, two years. Oh, you don't have to have a degree to get a teaching qualification (it used to be the CertEd).

    They are all part time courses usually one evening a week (dependent on the college that's running it). This will cover lesson plans, SoW, practical teaching (oh yes, you will need to aquire 60 hours of teaching per year - normally over 9 students at any one go), learning styles, risk assessment.....

    The government (local council/Student finance bods) can give you a grant to cover the cost of the course.

    It may well pay you to ask at a local adult education college and see if you can take evening classes.

    Merlin
    • jessicamb
    • By jessicamb 19th Oct 07, 9:43 PM
    • 10,067 Posts
    • 5,985 Thanks
    jessicamb

    Ystrad, by charging £5 an hour I am keeping it as an informal arrangement. Therefore I do not need to pay tax, NI, public liability insurance etc. The people that I tutor would not be able to afford £15, and if I was paying that much, I would expect the tutor to have a teaching qualification.
    Originally posted by dmg24
    you should be declaring the income and paying associated taxes/NI. All earnings are taxable.
    The early bird gets the worm but the second mouse gets the cheese
    • tomstickland
    • By tomstickland 19th Oct 07, 9:49 PM
    • 18,885 Posts
    • 15,427 Thanks
    tomstickland
    I did some maths tutoring about 10 years ago. I found it pretty easy TBH and there were people out there desperate for maths tutors. Like everything, it does involve time and effort though, so when I started a full time job I valued my time as being more important than the money.

    I worked via an agency.
    • ViksB
    • By ViksB 20th Oct 07, 7:12 PM
    • 327 Posts
    • 642 Thanks
    ViksB
    Could anybody recommend any good agencies as this is something I am considering too.??
    Thanks
    Viks
    • flossy_splodge
    • By flossy_splodge 21st Oct 07, 10:34 PM
    • 2,379 Posts
    • 1,402 Thanks
    flossy_splodge
    I would sugget you go into one or more of the local schools you would like to work with and ask firstly if they ever recommend private tuition and secondly which agency they use for supply teachers. Also look out for employment fairs as these agencies often attend them. Good luck.
    I also tutor maths privately but only ever get pupils on personal recommendation, both me to them and vice versa.

    "Be more concerned with your character than your reputation, because your character is what you really are, while your reputation is merely what others think you are.”
    ― John Wooden
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