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  • FIRST POST
    • katejo
    • By katejo 13th Jan 18, 7:36 PM
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    katejo
    re. high cholesterol medical insurance question
    • #1
    • 13th Jan 18, 7:36 PM
    re. high cholesterol medical insurance question 13th Jan 18 at 7:36 PM
    While searching for a travel insurance quote, i have come across policies which say that you must declare high cholesterol if you have ever had it. This seems strange. Most conditions, even cancer, don't need to be declared if you have been clear for 5 years. Is this requirement meant for someone who has had high cholesterol but now has a lower level due to taking statins?
    Do they really want someone to declare a slightly high cholesterol level even if they have never smoked, aren't overweight, don't have high blood pressure and don't have diabetes?
    Based on stats which I have seen this week, this would mean that at least 75% of the population would have to declare it for the rest of their lives. Rather a money spinner for insurance companies.
    Also the policies fail to define what is meant by 'high'.
Page 1
    • Quentin
    • By Quentin 13th Jan 18, 7:56 PM
    • 33,972 Posts
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    Quentin
    • #2
    • 13th Jan 18, 7:56 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Jan 18, 7:56 PM
    ... i have come across policies which say that you must declare high cholesterol if you have ever had it. This seems strange. Most conditions, even cancer, don't need to be declared if you have been clear for 5 years......
    Originally posted by katejo
    No


    Many conditions (including high cholesterol) often have to be disclosed if you ever had them


    eg. This is from staysure's application:
    Have you ever suffered from or received treatment, investigations or test for:
    • Heart attack, angina, chest pain(s) or any other heart condition
    • High blood pressure, blood clots, raised cholesterol, aneurysm or any circulatory disease
    • Any form of stroke, transient ischemic attack (mini-stroke) or brain haemorrhage
    • katejo
    • By katejo 13th Jan 18, 8:12 PM
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    katejo
    • #3
    • 13th Jan 18, 8:12 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Jan 18, 8:12 PM
    No


    Many conditions (including high cholesterol) often have to be disclosed if you ever had them


    eg. This is from staysure's application:
    [/LIST]
    Originally posted by Quentin
    Even just for a test? So if someone goes to A & E as a precaution with chest pain and it is just indigestion?
    • agrinnall
    • By agrinnall 13th Jan 18, 8:42 PM
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    agrinnall
    • #4
    • 13th Jan 18, 8:42 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Jan 18, 8:42 PM
    Even just for a test? So if someone goes to A & E as a precaution with chest pain and it is just indigestion?
    Originally posted by katejo
    You either have to answer the question that the insurer asks, or seek another insurer who asks different questions. Whether you agree with the questions or not is irrelevant unless you decide to go into the insurance business yourself.
    • theoretica
    • By theoretica 13th Jan 18, 10:04 PM
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    theoretica
    • #5
    • 13th Jan 18, 10:04 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Jan 18, 10:04 PM
    Even just for a test? So if someone goes to A & E as a precaution with chest pain and it is just indigestion?
    Originally posted by katejo
    That was my thought, only I was thinking about the test for high blood pressure. There must be very few people who have not had their blood pressure taken.
    But a banker, engaged at enormous expense,
    Had the whole of their cash in his care.
    Lewis Carroll
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 14th Jan 18, 11:50 AM
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    sheramber
    • #6
    • 14th Jan 18, 11:50 AM
    • #6
    • 14th Jan 18, 11:50 AM
    If someone is taking statins then the cholesterol isn't clear it is controlled by medication and would need to be declared as such.
    • katejo
    • By katejo 14th Jan 18, 5:03 PM
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    katejo
    • #7
    • 14th Jan 18, 5:03 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Jan 18, 5:03 PM
    If someone is taking statins then the cholesterol isn't clear it is controlled by medication and would need to be declared as such.
    Originally posted by sheramber
    Yes if my cholesterol level had dropped because i was taking statins, then I would expect to declare it because of the need for medication.
    • katejo
    • By katejo 14th Jan 18, 5:05 PM
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    katejo
    • #8
    • 14th Jan 18, 5:05 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Jan 18, 5:05 PM
    That was my thought, only I was thinking about the test for high blood pressure. There must be very few people who have not had their blood pressure taken.
    Originally posted by theoretica
    Perhaps you would then need to check your blood pressure with a GP before buying a policy?
    • Quentin
    • By Quentin 14th Jan 18, 7:56 PM
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    Quentin
    • #9
    • 14th Jan 18, 7:56 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Jan 18, 7:56 PM
    That was my thought, only I was thinking about the test for high blood pressure. There must be very few people who have not had their blood pressure taken.
    Originally posted by theoretica
    Having your bp checked is not necessarily because you may have high BP!
    • Clifford_Pope
    • By Clifford_Pope 15th Jan 18, 9:12 AM
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    Clifford_Pope
    Having your bp checked is not necessarily because you may have high BP!
    Originally posted by Quentin
    The purpose of a test is to find out your blood pressure. It could be high, low, normal, or abnormally fluctuating.

    So are you saying that as a BP test is not necessarily to check for high BP, you can answer No to the insurer's question, because when taking the test you not necessarily know what it is for?

    That seems an unusually relaxed attitude by the insurer. It would imply that when having a BP test, it is important to ask just for a test, not specifically a test to see if you had high BP. Then if it isn't high, you can say No to the question. But if you ask to be tested for high BP and the result is your BP is normal, you would have to answer Yes because you had been tested for it?
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 15th Jan 18, 1:45 PM
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    sheramber
    If you answer yes, you have had it tested, then there would normally be a follow up question to clarify if treatment was required.

    The initial questions are to establish what further information is required.

    Just having had a test does not necessarily mean a higher premium.

    My husband had medication earlier this year to control HBP due to a problem with his adrenal gland. The gland was removed and BP is now normal without any further medication.

    Pregnant women get their BP checked at every ante natal appointment. It doesn't follow that they have HBP.

    So yes, the answer is yes.

    If you answer no then make a claim the company may ask for a medical history which will show you have had it checked.

    If you have it checked and it is normal then that is in your favour not against you.
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