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  • FIRST POST
    • dannim12345
    • By dannim12345 12th Jan 18, 9:41 AM
    • 241Posts
    • 106Thanks
    dannim12345
    Downpipe discharges onto the pavement - damp
    • #1
    • 12th Jan 18, 9:41 AM
    Downpipe discharges onto the pavement - damp 12th Jan 18 at 9:41 AM
    I have a Victorian terrace house and the downpipe on the front of the house discharges directly into the pavement. It is also recessed partial (up to first floor level). Not internal but the brickworks recesses in this area. All/most of the houses on the have the same ‘design’. There are no front gardens.

    I have a damp patch where the Downpipe is internally. I am going to clear the guttering/downpipe and replace joints etc (as required).

    But is there anything further I can do? I was thinking along the lines of paint / sealers? E.g Something to stop the wall getting damp if the water still splashes the area. The house has pebble dash which we are plannnig to paint at some point.

    Thanks
Page 1
    • missile
    • By missile 12th Jan 18, 10:20 AM
    • 9,148 Posts
    • 4,476 Thanks
    missile
    • #2
    • 12th Jan 18, 10:20 AM
    • #2
    • 12th Jan 18, 10:20 AM
    A picture would help. You have a Victorian terrace which is still standing. The design must be "sound".

    Clear the gutter and down pipe. Examine carefully during heavy rain to identify any leaks.
    "A nation's greatness is measured by how it treats its weakest members." ~ Mahatma Gandhi
    Ride hard or stay home
    • dannim12345
    • By dannim12345 12th Jan 18, 11:45 AM
    • 241 Posts
    • 106 Thanks
    dannim12345
    • #3
    • 12th Jan 18, 11:45 AM
    • #3
    • 12th Jan 18, 11:45 AM
    Thanks. I’ll will take a photo once i’m Home - can’t find photos of anything similar online.
    • shaun from Africa
    • By shaun from Africa 12th Jan 18, 11:53 AM
    • 9,682 Posts
    • 10,877 Thanks
    shaun from Africa
    • #4
    • 12th Jan 18, 11:53 AM
    • #4
    • 12th Jan 18, 11:53 AM
    I've no idea of the cost or amount of work involved, but why not give a company such as these a call:
    http://www.drainlinesouthern.co.uk/downpipe-relining/

    https://www.westsussexdrains.co.uk/domestic-services/re-lining/

    They both state that vertical downpipes can be relined.
    • dannim12345
    • By dannim12345 13th Jan 18, 9:28 AM
    • 241 Posts
    • 106 Thanks
    dannim12345
    • #5
    • 13th Jan 18, 9:28 AM
    • #5
    • 13th Jan 18, 9:28 AM
    Should of said the gutter & downpipe are currently pvc
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 13th Jan 18, 11:39 AM
    • 24,220 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    • #6
    • 13th Jan 18, 11:39 AM
    • #6
    • 13th Jan 18, 11:39 AM
    Just make sure the outlet is really close to the ground to prevent splashing and check that the pavement is sloping away from the house. The wall shouldn’t recieve a soaking at all.

    The area may just need repointing as well.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • dannim12345
    • By dannim12345 14th Jan 18, 8:32 PM
    • 241 Posts
    • 106 Thanks
    dannim12345
    • #7
    • 14th Jan 18, 8:32 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Jan 18, 8:32 PM
    Thanks everyone
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