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  • FIRST POST
    • hilljd00
    • By hilljd00 30th Nov 17, 5:10 PM
    • 27Posts
    • 5Thanks
    hilljd00
    Underfloor Heating: Best Practices?
    • #1
    • 30th Nov 17, 5:10 PM
    Underfloor Heating: Best Practices? 30th Nov 17 at 5:10 PM
    Hello

    I have had underfloor heating since 2009. But no one seems convinced of the best method on how to heat a home using this system.

    What do you do and why?
    - I'd be interested to know what temperature/hours you have set.

    Thank you.
    Last edited by hilljd00; 30-11-2017 at 5:45 PM.
Page 1
    • matelodave
    • By matelodave 1st Dec 17, 8:10 PM
    • 3,174 Posts
    • 1,894 Thanks
    matelodave
    • #2
    • 1st Dec 17, 8:10 PM
    • #2
    • 1st Dec 17, 8:10 PM
    What sort of underfloor heating. Hot water or electric.

    Is it embedded in concrete. If it's electric are you on an E7/E10 or complex metering tariff.

    If it's hot water, what feeds it, gas boiler, oil boiler. what's your flow temperature?

    How is it controlled - timer, programmer, thermostat etc. If hot water do you have manifolds to distribute the water to differnt areas?

    I've got an overlay hot water u/f system fed by an air source heat pump which runs virtually continuously at this time of the year. The flow temperature varies between 30- 40 degrees, depending on the outside temperature and the house is split into separate zones, each controlled by a programmable thermostat which varies the required temperature at different times of the day.

    We do not shut the heating off but turn it down by 2-3 degrees overnight or in rooms that aren't in use during the day (bedrooms & bathroom) otherwise the place can get too cold and it takes a long time to reheat.

    As it's an overlay system, it's a bit more responsive than a system where the pipes are actually embedded in the floor screed but still quite slow to react.
    Last edited by matelodave; 01-12-2017 at 10:16 PM.
    Love makes the world go round - beer make it go round even faster
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 1st Dec 17, 8:59 PM
    • 27,109 Posts
    • 13,222 Thanks
    Cardew
    • #3
    • 1st Dec 17, 8:59 PM
    • #3
    • 1st Dec 17, 8:59 PM
    Compared to conventional central heating, UFH is generally used at low heat for a long period; which is why it is so suited for use with a heat pump.
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