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  • FIRST POST
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 29th Nov 17, 2:31 PM
    • 14,260Posts
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    Price for sockets in house
    • #1
    • 29th Nov 17, 2:31 PM
    Price for sockets in house 29th Nov 17 at 2:31 PM
    What would be a reasonable price per socket to pay for new electric sockets in my house please? Just standard double white plastic sockets.
    New Year's Resolution already made -

    Don't get mad....get firm ...
Page 1
    • Ebe Scrooge
    • By Ebe Scrooge 29th Nov 17, 3:53 PM
    • 4,016 Posts
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    Ebe Scrooge
    • #2
    • 29th Nov 17, 3:53 PM
    • #2
    • 29th Nov 17, 3:53 PM
    £3.89 per socket ? : https://www.screwfix.com/p/mk-13a-2-gang-dp-switched-plug-socket-white/15747
    I may not know much about art, but I know what I like.
    • pramsay13
    • By pramsay13 29th Nov 17, 4:07 PM
    • 240 Posts
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    pramsay13
    • #3
    • 29th Nov 17, 4:07 PM
    • #3
    • 29th Nov 17, 4:07 PM
    Depends on how they will get from the shop to actually being installed on your wall and working properly.
    • pennystretcher
    • By pennystretcher 29th Nov 17, 4:41 PM
    • 311 Posts
    • 1,329 Thanks
    pennystretcher
    • #4
    • 29th Nov 17, 4:41 PM
    • #4
    • 29th Nov 17, 4:41 PM
    I just had electrical work done (it was a big list), guestimate is that fitting a socket and connecting it to existing spur (the big red fused switch on the wall) was about £35+VAT (so yours would may be around £70+VAT). I'm in Scotland BTW.

    You need cabling etc so depends how difficult it is to do and - not an expert on this - but if the current circuit can handle it or not. (Check if your fuse board has empty slots in it in case..) Easiest is to call a company and ask if they could do a site visit in order to get a quote.

    Also see https://local.which.co.uk/advice/cost-price-information-electricians
    Last edited by pennystretcher; 29-11-2017 at 4:46 PM.
    MFW Dec 2017 £290 (almost there!!!)
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 29th Nov 17, 5:00 PM
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #5
    • 29th Nov 17, 5:00 PM
    • #5
    • 29th Nov 17, 5:00 PM
    Depends on how they will get from the shop to actually being installed on your wall and working properly.
    Originally posted by pramsay13
    Yep- I shoulda clarified - basically I mean what an electrician would charge me to fit them.

    I am not sure whether they would have to change the cables behind the sockets. It's a modern circuit breaker board - so should have any "space" required.
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 29-11-2017 at 5:04 PM.
    New Year's Resolution already made -

    Don't get mad....get firm ...
    • Ebe Scrooge
    • By Ebe Scrooge 29th Nov 17, 7:31 PM
    • 4,016 Posts
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    Ebe Scrooge
    • #6
    • 29th Nov 17, 7:31 PM
    • #6
    • 29th Nov 17, 7:31 PM
    Yep- I shoulda clarified - basically I mean what an electrician would charge me to fit them.

    I am not sure whether they would have to change the cables behind the sockets. It's a modern circuit breaker board - so should have any "space" required.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    You need to clarify what you're looking for. Just changing the faceplates on existing sockets ? If so, two and a half quid a pop, a very simple DIY job. Or a 5 minute job for an electrician if you're not confident in doing this yourself. Installing extra spurred sockets to an existing ring ? Again, a simple DIY job, though more labour, and you need to factor in the cost of the back boxes as well as the faceplates. But again, very cheap and easy. Or a whole new ring, connected to the CU on its own circuit ? Quite a bit more work, a lot of channelling and floor-board-lifting, etc. - you're looking at more than a few quid for that.
    I may not know much about art, but I know what I like.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 29th Nov 17, 8:07 PM
    • 14,260 Posts
    • 38,652 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #7
    • 29th Nov 17, 8:07 PM
    • #7
    • 29th Nov 17, 8:07 PM
    Lets go worst case analysis on this.

    This is work to existing sockets which I may/or may not (long story) have to pay for myself.

    It is possible all the wires to some existing sockets may have to be ripped out and replaced - as it may be the case they are unsafe. Yep...maybe even right through to channelling out some of my walls to get the wires in/out.
    New Year's Resolution already made -

    Don't get mad....get firm ...
    • pennystretcher
    • By pennystretcher 29th Nov 17, 8:36 PM
    • 311 Posts
    • 1,329 Thanks
    pennystretcher
    • #8
    • 29th Nov 17, 8:36 PM
    • #8
    • 29th Nov 17, 8:36 PM
    To clarify - do you have single sockets you want to replace with double sockets or are these totally new double sockets you want to get fitted? And how old is your property?
    MFW Dec 2017 £290 (almost there!!!)
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 29th Nov 17, 10:26 PM
    • 14,260 Posts
    • 38,652 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #9
    • 29th Nov 17, 10:26 PM
    • #9
    • 29th Nov 17, 10:26 PM
    To clarify - do you have single sockets you want to replace with double sockets or are these totally new double sockets you want to get fitted? And how old is your property?
    Originally posted by pennystretcher

    Double to double. Same socket covers - but possibly (probably) new wires to replace existing wires going to them.

    1970s.
    New Year's Resolution already made -

    Don't get mad....get firm ...
    • ceredigion
    • By ceredigion 29th Nov 17, 10:35 PM
    • 2,422 Posts
    • 3,028 Thanks
    ceredigion
    how long is a piece of (1.5 twin and earth cable) string
    • observations from a hill
    • By observations from a hill 29th Nov 17, 11:52 PM
    • 149 Posts
    • 154 Thanks
    observations from a hill
    Get an electrician to quote - if its sockets only, you won't need rewiring on a1970's build except for "bodges" - which may or may not prove to be expensive.
    Last edited by observations from a hill; 30-11-2017 at 12:03 AM.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 30th Nov 17, 7:35 AM
    • 14,260 Posts
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    Yep - it's a bodge I'm referring to.

    Surveyor didnt say house needed rewiring (not the slightest hint from him about it). Electrician I had in for extra work I wanted didnt say place needed rewiring and just added extra sockets/changed fusebox to consumer unit and I thought that was "it".

    Now found out that both of them let me down and place should have been completely rewired (it does help if one is told these things!!) and I think I'm going to have to have some wiring behind some sockets replaced now. Hence trying to figure out my "worst case analysis" of cost in case...though I've got fingers crossed NIC/EIC will sort this for me (as I chose an electrician from their list).

    So trying to figure out my worst case analysis in case I have to pay for this myself.

    Thanks anyway folks. Looks like I'm not going to be able to get much of an idea - oh well....I'll mentally set to one side £1,000 and hope that (if I'm the one who has to pay for bodging) that that will cover it.

    EDIT; I know so little about electrics (being a householder) that I'm reading another current thread with astonishment at finding one needs higher voltage type cable if having range cooker instead of ordinary cooker - I wouldnt have had the foggiest idea about that. I just thought it was "old cooker out - new cooker in" and electrician to connect existing wire....
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 30-11-2017 at 7:40 AM.
    New Year's Resolution already made -

    Don't get mad....get firm ...
    • Witless
    • By Witless 30th Nov 17, 8:02 AM
    • 561 Posts
    • 2,193 Thanks
    Witless
    It is possible all the wires to some existing sockets may have to be ripped out and replaced - as it may be the case they are unsafe. Yep...maybe even right through to channelling out some of my walls to get the wires in/out.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    May be unsafe or is unsafe? Don't forget that wiring standards change by editions / amendments: that doesn't mean wiring that meets previous requirements is unsafe.

    New? Or additional?

    Why? Are you really saying the wires are plastered into the walls without conduit? If the wires are in conduit then new wires can be pulled through.

    Loads of estimate sites around; this is one - https://local.which.co.uk/advice/cost-price-information-electricians
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 30th Nov 17, 9:09 AM
    • 14,260 Posts
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    Would wires put into a 1970s house by a "bad" builder (as I'm told he was) have been put into conduit?

    We are talking external walls (and not internal plasterboard walls).
    New Year's Resolution already made -

    Don't get mad....get firm ...
    • Witless
    • By Witless 30th Nov 17, 2:12 PM
    • 561 Posts
    • 2,193 Thanks
    Witless
    Would wires put into a 1970s house by a "bad" builder (as I'm told he was) have been put into conduit?

    We are talking external walls (and not internal plasterboard walls).
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention

    Piece of string question.

    If the walls were 'tracked' - possibly. If a 'cheapie' job possibly run loose down the cavity (I presume there is one). Not ideal BTW.

    Either way I would expect they can be pulled.

    Did you specify conduit to be used? Or to be wired to a specific standard? For example 16th Edition 3rd amendment? (the 'standard' in 2000 AFAIK).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BS_7671 details the latest requirements.
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 30th Nov 17, 2:37 PM
    • 23,164 Posts
    • 60,022 Thanks
    pollypenny
    We’ve just three single point changed to double, two of them with USB. £146.21.

    North Wales - there might have been a former teacher discount in that, though.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 30th Nov 17, 3:52 PM
    • 2,645 Posts
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    glasgowdan
    How do you know the house needs rewired?
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 30th Nov 17, 6:40 PM
    • 14,260 Posts
    • 38,652 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    I've been told this latterly by a tradesperson.

    By now (long story later) and I can see it would have been best if it had been totally rewired when I bought it (if only I'd been told that by "Homebuyers Survey" or initial electrician).

    The way things are now though - which is that some rewiring has been done and it's how much of the gap to bridge between where it's currently at and the full rewire I would have had done if I'd known.

    I've had an internet friend explaining to me now just how these sockets were probably set up and exactly what needs to be done to sort things in them to more modern standards and he's told me he reckons it's down to 10 minutes per socket.

    So, with that, I think it looks like I need an electrician in for around 2 hours and I know exactly what to tell them to do (in their own technical language) now

    So - my likely costs are:
    - 2 hours of an electricians time
    - small amount on necessary materials to do what internet friend has explained to me.

    So I think I now have a (very rough guesstimate) of the ballpark figure I'm looking at now:
    2 hours of electricians time = say £100? Absolute max = £200 (to allow for a minimum charge thing if I have to)
    Small amount of materials = cant think that would be more than £100 surely?

    So - I'm hazarding guess at somewheres between £200 - £300.
    New Year's Resolution already made -

    Don't get mad....get firm ...
    • pramsay13
    • By pramsay13 30th Nov 17, 7:00 PM
    • 240 Posts
    • 718 Thanks
    pramsay13
    It's tricky for someone here to guess a price when you are just guessing at the work needing done.
    I would suggest getting a Periodic Inspection Report / Electrical Installation Condition Report.
    This will cost but it will tell you what needs to be done and when (e.g. danger present, potentially dangerous, improvement recommended.
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 30th Nov 17, 9:02 PM
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    glasgowdan
    A generic "tradesperson" telling you that you NEED electrical work doesn't mean anything.

    Does everything work?
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