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    • Cpu2007
    • By Cpu2007 12th Sep 17, 1:31 PM
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    Cpu2007
    Returning shoes after wearing them - painful
    • #1
    • 12th Sep 17, 1:31 PM
    Returning shoes after wearing them - painful 12th Sep 17 at 1:31 PM
    I hope someone can advice me on this.

    I bought some very expensive shoes online, these are trainers, to be used in the gym.
    When I received them, I worn them at the gym but I found them to be uncomfortable/painful.

    I took them to one of the nearest stores and explained them the situation but they refused to return those shoes back because they were worn once.

    I looked online and if I understand this correctly, I have the right to return shoes back within 14 days for any reason, that could be if the look and feel of those trainers isn't as advertised

    Reading their description I felt they are good on a variety of surfaces and good trainers for gym

    " hard-wearing, comfortable ride. An Air Sole unit in the heel keeps your feet feeling good with maximum impact protection, while a herringbone traction pattern to the outsole delivers multidirectional movement on a variety of surfaces."

    However that isn't the case, something I found out only after testing them at the gym.

    What are my rights here?

    Thanks
Page 1
    • AndyPix
    • By AndyPix 12th Sep 17, 1:43 PM
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    AndyPix
    • #2
    • 12th Sep 17, 1:43 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Sep 17, 1:43 PM
    Im sure that returns right only applies if the goods are in a re-sellable condition.
    Which they wont be if they have been worn
    Running with scissors since 1978
    • neilmcl
    • By neilmcl 12th Sep 17, 2:00 PM
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    neilmcl
    • #3
    • 12th Sep 17, 2:00 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Sep 17, 2:00 PM
    The idea of comfort when it comes to shoes is highly subject given that there are wide variations in shapes and sizes in peoples feet so I very much doubt you will be able to return them for not being as described or in any way faulty. As you bought them online you are correct you do have the right to return them under the Consumer Contracts Regulations (CCRs) however the seller can deduct an amount to cover any diminished value if your usage has gone beyond what is reasonable. This is determined by the extent of handling you could reasonably expect to do in a shop.
    • Cpu2007
    • By Cpu2007 12th Sep 17, 2:19 PM
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    Cpu2007
    • #4
    • 12th Sep 17, 2:19 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Sep 17, 2:19 PM
    Thank you, I spoke to the store and they refused to have them returned.
    I spoke to the customer service and they refused as well.

    I guess I wasted money on this as I can't use them now.

    I understand that comfort is subjective but just by wearing them indoor, especially trainers, you can't tell whether they are suitable.
    The only way to achieve this is to wear/test them.
    • BorisThomson
    • By BorisThomson 12th Sep 17, 2:28 PM
    • 538 Posts
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    BorisThomson
    • #5
    • 12th Sep 17, 2:28 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Sep 17, 2:28 PM
    Thank you, I spoke to the store and they refused to have them returned.
    I spoke to the customer service and they refused as well.

    I guess I wasted money on this as I can't use them now.

    I understand that comfort is subjective but just by wearing them indoor, especially trainers, you can't tell whether they are suitable.
    The only way to achieve this is to wear/test them.
    Originally posted by Cpu2007
    If you go to a proper sports shop they can assess your gait so as to recommend an appropriate trainer. You should never buy a trainer without trying it and being sure it is appropriate for your foot shape.

    Strictly speaking the retailer cannot refuse your return. However they can reduce any refund to reflect your excessive use (going beyond trying at home) of the shoe, and this reduction can be 100%.

    Ebay?
    • jack_pott
    • By jack_pott 12th Sep 17, 2:30 PM
    • 4,264 Posts
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    jack_pott
    • #6
    • 12th Sep 17, 2:30 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Sep 17, 2:30 PM
    What are my rights here?
    Originally posted by Cpu2007
    None. Everyone knows that the risk in buying shoes is that you don't find out how comfortable they really are until you've been wearing them for a while. If you buy online without a shop to try them in you're taking an even bigger risk.
    • Cpu2007
    • By Cpu2007 12th Sep 17, 2:32 PM
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    Cpu2007
    • #7
    • 12th Sep 17, 2:32 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Sep 17, 2:32 PM
    It was JD sport, I tried their shoes and then bought them online as I could get some cashback.
    When I wore them at the store they were fine, all I did walk around a few steps.
    I worn them at the gym after purchasing them online and the top of the shoes rubs against my skin(leg), something not noticeable at the beginning but quite uncomfortable the more you use them.
    • pinkshoes
    • By pinkshoes 12th Sep 17, 2:35 PM
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    pinkshoes
    • #8
    • 12th Sep 17, 2:35 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Sep 17, 2:35 PM
    You had the right to test them at home e.g. On your feet whilst watching tv or having a walk round the carpet.

    Wearing them to the gym is beyond the test methods available should you have bought them in a shop.

    Your only option is to sell them on perhaps via Facebook or eBay if permitted.

    It is always such a gamble buying shoes! Expensive does not guarantee they fit your foot shape unfortuantely.

    I always buy Skechers trainers as they fit me so well.
    Should've = Should HAVE (not 'of')
    Would've = Would HAVE (not 'of')

    No, I am not perfect, but yes I do judge people on their use of basic English language. If you didn't know the above, then learn it! (If English is your second language, then you are forgiven!)
    • Cpu2007
    • By Cpu2007 12th Sep 17, 2:46 PM
    • 644 Posts
    • 36 Thanks
    Cpu2007
    • #9
    • 12th Sep 17, 2:46 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Sep 17, 2:46 PM
    I agree with that, but as I mentioned earlier walking around the house doesn't always give a clue about how comfortable shoes will be.
    I can understand how wearing them to the gym is beyond the test methods but if you can't test the for the purpose you bought them then, like you said, shoes are always a gamble.

    I bought them because I liked how the looked and my initial impression was they are comfortable, I've learned it the hard way that doing a few steps on trainers doesn't tell you whether they are good or not.
    • marliepanda
    • By marliepanda 12th Sep 17, 2:51 PM
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    marliepanda
    I agree with that, but as I mentioned earlier walking around the house doesn't always give a clue about how comfortable shoes will be.
    I can understand how wearing them to the gym is beyond the test methods but if you can't test the for the purpose you bought them then, like you said, shoes are always a gamble.

    I bought them because I liked how the looked and my initial impression was they are comfortable, I've learned it the hard way that doing a few steps on trainers doesn't tell you whether they are good or not.
    Originally posted by Cpu2007
    Running shops have treadmills you can walk and/or run on to get an idea.
    Survey Earnings 2017 - £163
    • Caz3121
    • By Caz3121 12th Sep 17, 3:05 PM
    • 10,848 Posts
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    Caz3121
    Running shops have treadmills you can walk and/or run on to get an idea.
    Originally posted by marliepanda
    When I bought mine they videoed me on the treadmill...there were a number not suited to my feet (in some it looked like I was running with 2 broken ankles!) when spending a large amount of money it is best to get it right for fit and suitability
    Now I know which ones (including separate insoles) I would buy the same ones if I needed to replace
    • Manxman in exile
    • By Manxman in exile 12th Sep 17, 7:42 PM
    • 1,017 Posts
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    Manxman in exile
    What make and model and what was their purpose? Cross-training, treadmill, aerobics, weights?
    • Laz123
    • By Laz123 13th Sep 17, 8:58 AM
    • 1,498 Posts
    • 918 Thanks
    Laz123
    I would try ways to soften the part where it rubs instead of chucking them away. I've rubbed raw potato on shoes before now because the starch softens and also banged the part with something hard.
    There's no present. There's only the immediate future and the recent past.
    George Carlin
    • Cpu2007
    • By Cpu2007 13th Sep 17, 9:07 AM
    • 644 Posts
    • 36 Thanks
    Cpu2007
    These are jordan eclipse, described as a high impact protection shoes, which makes the suitable for treadmill as well as weights in my opinion. The problem is with the upper side of the trainers, the side top line,which starts to hurt after a while. i'm not gonna through them away but will attempt to soften them or sell them and see how it goes.
    • marliepanda
    • By marliepanda 13th Sep 17, 9:35 AM
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    marliepanda
    https://www.google.co.uk/search?rlz=1C1GGRV_enGB750GB750&q=jordan+eclipse&o q=jordan+eclipse&gs_l=psy-ab.3..35i39k1l2j0i20k1j0.22335.22473.0.22630.2.2.0 .0.0.0.123.225.0j2.2.0....0...1.1.64.psy-ab..0.2.225...0i67k1.Y8NS6r4dZRE

    These Jordan Eclipse?

    Thats a fashion shoe not a 'high impact workout trainer' Where were they described as that?
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    • Cpu2007
    • By Cpu2007 13th Sep 17, 9:40 AM
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    • 36 Thanks
    Cpu2007
    I never said "high impact workout trainer"
    I said described as "high impact" shoes as on JD sports they state they provide maximum impact protection while traction pattern to the outsole delievers multidirectional movement on a variety of surfaces.
    To me that sounds like trainers that can be used on a treadmill as well as weights
    https://www.jdsports.co.uk/product/black-jordan-eclipse/281751/

    and durability for a hard-wearing, comfortable ride. An Air Sole unit in the heel keeps your feet feeling good with maximum impact protection, while a herringbone traction pattern to the outsole delivers multidirectional movement on a variety of surfaces.
    Last edited by Cpu2007; 13-09-2017 at 9:44 AM.
    • neilmcl
    • By neilmcl 13th Sep 17, 9:44 AM
    • 10,237 Posts
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    neilmcl
    I never said "high impact workout trainer"

    https://www.jdsports.co.uk/product/black-jordan-eclipse/281751/

    and durability for a hard-wearing, comfortable ride. An Air Sole unit in the heel keeps your feet feeling good with maximum impact protection, while a herringbone traction pattern to the outsole delivers multidirectional movement on a variety of surfaces.
    Originally posted by Cpu2007
    Try reading your own posts, you described them as "high impact protection shoes", something they're clearly not. If you go to the Nike website you'll clearly see them listed as a "Lifestyle" mid-top shoe, so no wonder they rub on your ankles.

    If you want gym shoes then buy gym shoes, if you want shoes to run on a treadmill then get some running shoes.
    Last edited by neilmcl; 13-09-2017 at 9:47 AM.
    • Cpu2007
    • By Cpu2007 13th Sep 17, 9:47 AM
    • 644 Posts
    • 36 Thanks
    Cpu2007
    Try reading your own posts, you described them as "high impact protection shoes", something they're clearly not advertised as. If you go to the Nike website you'll clearly see them listed as a "Lifestyle" mid-top shoe, so no wonder they rub on your ankles.
    Originally posted by neilmcl
    it says on their website "maximum impact protection"
    • neilmcl
    • By neilmcl 13th Sep 17, 9:49 AM
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    neilmcl
    it says on their website "maximum impact protection"
    Originally posted by Cpu2007
    On the street maybe, but not in a gym environment.
    • Cpu2007
    • By Cpu2007 13th Sep 17, 9:52 AM
    • 644 Posts
    • 36 Thanks
    Cpu2007
    On the street maybe, but not in a gym environment.
    Originally posted by neilmcl
    while a herringbone traction pattern to the outsole delivers multidirectional movement on a variety of surfaces

    to me that implies gym as well.
    I don't see my self doing multidirectional movements on the streets unfortunately.
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