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    • Annie2017
    • By Annie2017 16th Jul 17, 8:36 PM
    • 3Posts
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    Annie2017
    giving our house to the kids
    • #1
    • 16th Jul 17, 8:36 PM
    giving our house to the kids 16th Jul 17 at 8:36 PM
    My hubby and I are in our early 70's.own our house mortgage free 100% equity value £90 -95000 our problem is we would like to move closer to our children in Hertfordshire we are both in poor health and to have our children and grandchildren there for support and just nearness would be great for us and they do want us closer. We have applied to the council for supported housing, and they have put us on their list but even tho we have provide doctors letters regarding physical and mental benefits we have been put on the lowest banding reason is we own our own house. and can provide for ourselves. we have looked at renting but at £12,000 + a year not only the amount of rent but also the fact that we could be asked at sometime time to move out which at our age and poor health is we could be moving around for many years is quite worrying. buying is out of the question because even a 1 bed flat is £200,000 + the reason for giving you our little story is to see if fellow members have been in our situation, if we turned over the house to our kids legally of course would we then seen to be without owning our home and hope move up the banding? or would we be causing more problems any thoughts and advice would be great.x
Page 1
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 16th Jul 17, 9:23 PM
    • 2,667 Posts
    • 3,637 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    • #2
    • 16th Jul 17, 9:23 PM
    • #2
    • 16th Jul 17, 9:23 PM
    Giving your house to your children won't increase the amount of council property in Hertfordshire. The council that you have applied to probably doesn't have enough supported housing for the people already living in Hertfordshire.

    What does it say on their website about applications for council housing from outside the area?
    • Keep pedalling
    • By Keep pedalling 16th Jul 17, 10:49 PM
    • 3,436 Posts
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    Keep pedalling
    • #3
    • 16th Jul 17, 10:49 PM
    • #3
    • 16th Jul 17, 10:49 PM
    That would be classed as deprivation of assets, so no it won't help. Have you looked at sheltered housing costs?
    • oystercatcher
    • By oystercatcher 16th Jul 17, 10:57 PM
    • 1,675 Posts
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    oystercatcher
    • #4
    • 16th Jul 17, 10:57 PM
    • #4
    • 16th Jul 17, 10:57 PM
    Just a random thought. I live in Hertfordshire and know quite a few people who live in park homes which are much cheaper than bricks and mortar . Not everyones ideal but it could be a way of affording your own home down here. Those that live there seem to love it. There is monthly ground rent to pay as well as buying the place but it is an economical way to live in an expensive area.
    • 00ec25
    • By 00ec25 16th Jul 17, 11:03 PM
    • 4,538 Posts
    • 3,917 Thanks
    00ec25
    • #5
    • 16th Jul 17, 11:03 PM
    • #5
    • 16th Jul 17, 11:03 PM
    Just a random thought. I live in Hertfordshire and know quite a few people who live in park homes which are much cheaper than bricks and mortar . Not everyones ideal but it could be a way of affording your own home down here. Those that live there seem to love it. There is monthly ground rent to pay as well as buying the place but it is an economical way to live in an expensive area.
    Originally posted by oystercatcher


    a park home is a fine way to live for as long as you have piles of cash to :
    a) buy the glorified caravan in the first place (you won't get a mortgage)
    b) find a site that allows you to live there all year round (the majority have planning restrictions meaning you can't)
    c) have a site owner whose site contract does not force you to replace the caravan every X years with a brand new one (you own the caravan, not the land it sits on so the site owner dictates your life)
    d) have a site owner who does not fleece you at every turn in respect of site charges and utility bills
    • karcher
    • By karcher 16th Jul 17, 11:04 PM
    • 1,223 Posts
    • 10,204 Thanks
    karcher
    • #6
    • 16th Jul 17, 11:04 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Jul 17, 11:04 PM
    My hubby and I are in our early 70's.own our house mortgage free 100% equity value £90 -95000 our problem is we would like to move closer to our children in Hertfordshire we are both in poor health and to have our children and grandchildren there for support and just nearness would be great for us and they do want us closer. We have applied to the council for supported housing, and they have put us on their list but even tho we have provide doctors letters regarding physical and mental benefits we have been put on the lowest banding reason is we own our own house. and can provide for ourselves. we have looked at renting but at £12,000 + a year not only the amount of rent but also the fact that we could be asked at sometime time to move out which at our age and poor health is we could be moving around for many years is quite worrying. buying is out of the question because even a 1 bed flat is £200,000 + the reason for giving you our little story is to see if fellow members have been in our situation, if we turned over the house to our kids legally of course would we then seen to be without owning our home and hope move up the banding? or would we be causing more problems any thoughts and advice would be great.x
    Originally posted by Annie2017
    Refreshingly, not many biting tonight
    • oystercatcher
    • By oystercatcher 16th Jul 17, 11:12 PM
    • 1,675 Posts
    • 4,236 Thanks
    oystercatcher
    • #7
    • 16th Jul 17, 11:12 PM
    • #7
    • 16th Jul 17, 11:12 PM


    a park home is a fine way to live for as long as you have piles of cash to :
    a) buy the glorified caravan in the first place (you won't get a mortgage)
    b) find a site that allows you to live there all year round (the majority have planning restrictions meaning you can't)
    c) have a site owner whose site contract does not force you to replace the caravan every X years with a brand new one (you own the caravan, not the land it sits on so the site owner dictates your life)
    d) have a site owner who does not fleece you at every turn in respect of site charges and utility bills
    Originally posted by 00ec25
    They said they have a house they could sell. There are loads of full time residential sites around Hertfordshire. These aren't the metal caravans you see at seaside parks, more permanent structures. Yes the landlords rip you off over utilities but that's the price you pay . It's just a potential idea to think about that could work . They certainly wont be getting a council or housing association property down here, even those in need can't get them !
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 17th Jul 17, 6:26 AM
    • 29,466 Posts
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    getmore4less
    • #8
    • 17th Jul 17, 6:26 AM
    • #8
    • 17th Jul 17, 6:26 AM
    b) find a site that allows you to live there all year round (the majority have planning restrictions meaning you can't)
    Originally posted by 00ec25
    the restictions are often 11month max.

    In an area we frequent the solution used is the local B&B owners offer rooms off season(jan/feb time frame) on a room only basis, with access to the kitchen for the month and go on holiday themselves.
    • xylophone
    • By xylophone 17th Jul 17, 10:56 AM
    • 22,376 Posts
    • 12,912 Thanks
    xylophone
    • #9
    • 17th Jul 17, 10:56 AM
    • #9
    • 17th Jul 17, 10:56 AM
    we would like to move closer to our children
    Would it be possible to live with family?

    Or does one of the offspring have a house which could be extended to provide an extra couple of rooms and a bathroom?

    You could then sell your property and pay your way at the offspring's house.
    • 00ec25
    • By 00ec25 17th Jul 17, 11:29 AM
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    • 3,917 Thanks
    00ec25
    They said they have a house they could sell.
    Originally posted by oystercatcher
    indeed they did, which is why investing their once in a lifetime pot of money in a depreciating asset where they can be forced to scrap it and replace it at a future date may not be a wise solution
    There are loads of full time residential sites around Hertfordshire.These aren't the metal caravans you see at seaside parks, more permanent structures.
    Originally posted by oystercatcher
    fair enough, you know the area. However, does not negate points a) and c)
    Yes the landlords rip you off over utilities but that's the price you pay . It's just a potential idea to think about that could work . They certainly wont be getting a council or housing association property down here, even those in need can't get them !
    Originally posted by oystercatcher
    agreed, it is an option and lots of people obviously do live in "park" homes. Could I suggest however that (gross generalisation) they tend to be there because they have little other option. My first house was an ex RTB. The vendor (the RTB purchaser) moved to a park home because they found the costs of having to pay a mortgage and maintain a home was too much for them, and they were no longer able to go back to renting from the council. To say they were bitter about their life choice would be an understatement.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 17th Jul 17, 2:06 PM
    • 2,667 Posts
    • 3,637 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    My hubby and I are in our early 70's.own our house mortgage free 100% equity value £90 -95000 our problem is we would like to move closer to our children in Hertfordshire we are both in poor health and to have our children and grandchildren there for support and just nearness would be great for us and they do want us closer. We have applied to the council for supported housing, and they have put us on their list but even tho we have provide doctors letters regarding physical and mental benefits we have been put on the lowest banding reason is we own our own house. and can provide for ourselves. we have looked at renting but at £12,000 + a year not only the amount of rent but also the fact that we could be asked at sometime time to move out which at our age and poor health is we could be moving around for many years is quite worrying. buying is out of the question because even a 1 bed flat is £200,000 + the reason for giving you our little story is to see if fellow members have been in our situation, if we turned over the house to our kids legally of course would we then seen to be without owning our home and hope move up the banding? or would we be causing more problems any thoughts and advice would be great.x
    Originally posted by Annie2017
    You don't say where you live now but if it isn't already in Hertfordshire then you will be in the bottom band whether you already have a house or not. The bottom band includes people without a local connection which if you don't already live in Hertforshire includes you.

    http://www.hertschoicehomes.org.uk/choice/Content.aspx?wkid=14

    It looks as if you would be better to seek sheltered housing where you live now.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 17th Jul 17, 2:39 PM
    • 9,481 Posts
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    lincroft1710
    Park home sites are designed for year round living and have 12 months occupancy. Usually park homes are sold on long leases and the site owners can't just force home owners to upgrade as on holiday parks. 40 yr old park homes can be found on quite a few parks, a large site in the Chertsey/Staines area has several, some even perhaps 50 yrs old.

    But there are some rogue site operators still out there
    • Annie2017
    • By Annie2017 18th Jul 17, 9:56 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Annie2017
    Cakeguts answers
    Thank you all for your helpful replies in answer to cakeguts question ( don't know how to copy the questions )
    We live in Derbyshire hence the huge difference in cost of properties, we do have local connections, according to the council we are bottom banded because we own our own house, and are able to support our own accommodation i.e. renting but at £12,000 + a year the money wouldn't go far, as we are not on any benefits we would not get help with the costs.
    The same applies to the Derbyshire council no help as we own the house and have full equity and no debts against it. It seems to us that by working hard having a private pension (small as it is) no debts and owning your own property does not give you the help when you need it. We may own the house but as pensioners there isn't a stash of cash somewhere - I wish
    • saajan_12
    • By saajan_12 18th Jul 17, 11:34 AM
    • 647 Posts
    • 422 Thanks
    saajan_12
    Thank you all for your helpful replies in answer to cakeguts question ( don't know how to copy the questions ) - just hit the 'Quote' button at teh bottom of a post to include it in your reply
    We live in Derbyshire hence the huge difference in cost of properties, we do have local connections, according to the council we are bottom banded because we own our own house, and are able to support our own accommodation - exactly,
    you own your home and have significant equity. why should you get cheaper accommodation or benefits which is in short supply,
    while keeping hold of your equity?
    i.e. renting but at £12,000 + a year the money wouldn't go far, as we are not on any benefits we would not get help with the costs. -
    but it would go somewhere. If/when your assets run out, you may be able to claim benefits (unfortunately)

    The same applies to the Derbyshire council no help as we own the house and have full equity and no debts against it. It seems to us that by working hard having a private pension (small as it is) no debts and owning your own property does not give you the help when you need it. so should every homeowner get extra help? who would pay for that then? You have somewhere decent to live, if you choose to change/improve that, you have to pay. We may own the house but as pensioners there isn't a stash of cash somewhere - there is, it's tied up in your house. - I wish
    Originally posted by Annie2017
    Benefits / council housing are in short supply, so focused on those that need it the most. You want it, but don't need it.
    • xylophone
    • By xylophone 18th Jul 17, 12:36 PM
    • 22,376 Posts
    • 12,912 Thanks
    xylophone
    Thank you all for your helpful replies in answer to cakeguts question ( don't know how to copy the questions )
    Have you seen the questions in post 9? Would this be a possibility?
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 18th Jul 17, 1:06 PM
    • 1,509 Posts
    • 4,070 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    It seems to us that by working hard having a private pension (small as it is) no debts and owning your own property does not give you the help when you need it. We may own the house but as pensioners there isn't a stash of cash somewhere - I wish
    Originally posted by Annie2017
    The house is your 'stash of cash' if you don't want to live there anymore.

    Working hard has given you a home that you own mortgage free, that's not a bad reward! The fact that you don't want to live in it anymore isn't really something that I would consider it the responsibility of the state to sort out.

    You could sell up and move into private rented in Hertfordshire, when you run out of money you can claim housing benefit (so getting help when you need it!) and if you eventually come to a point where you can't afford suitable accommodation, maybe because you need adaptations due to your health, and may be at risk of becoming homeless, you will find you are a much higher priority on the council housing list (so again, help when you need it!)
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 18th Jul 17, 1:43 PM
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    Cakeguts
    Do you mean that can't buy a sheltered housing flat in Derbyshire?
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