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  • FIRST POST
    • MrHeisenberg
    • By MrHeisenberg 1st Jul 17, 6:13 PM
    • 27Posts
    • 2Thanks
    MrHeisenberg
    Refused dental bridge on the NHS
    • #1
    • 1st Jul 17, 6:13 PM
    Refused dental bridge on the NHS 1st Jul 17 at 6:13 PM
    Hi all,

    My NHS dentist has refused to provide me with a dental bridge on the NHS. She has been rather unclear as to the rationale and reasoning though, from what I understand, the main reasons are it would be a rather long bridge (UL1 to UR4) and it is around a "corner". She also expressed reluctance to "damage" the surrounding teeth but that would happen with any bridge.

    I lost the teeth due to trauma at a young age.

    Has anyone experienced something similar and if there are any dentists out there I would seriously value your input.

    Sincere thanks.
Page 2
    • welshdent
    • By welshdent 20th Jul 17, 10:32 PM
    • 1,849 Posts
    • 1,212 Thanks
    welshdent
    Many things are technically possible. Doesn't mean it's the right thing to do.

    Personally I don't remember the last time I did a 4 unit bridge. I certainly haven't done one incorporating a canine tooth around the natural arch of the mouth like that. They are extremely difficult to get right at the best of times. For someone who doesn't do them often it's even harder. Also 25% of healthy teeth, when prepared for crowns, end up with irreversible damage to the nerve. So you could end up losing even more teeth.

    I'm afraid I'd be giving the same advice too.
    • junes9333
    • By junes9333 9th Jan 18, 3:16 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    junes9333
    dental charges for a bridge in wales
    Hi i am wanting a bridge to cover 1 gap (missing tooth) i have been told by a NHS dental receptionist that i could possibly have a bridge and would cost up to £200 depending what type of bridge, but my dental appointment is not due until April , i am wondering if my NHS dentist can refuse me a bridge at their discretion because of the work involved, although i am willing to pay the extra?.

    Perhaps "Welshdent" would be able to advise on this matter as to the knowledge produced on this particular thread.
    Last edited by junes9333; 09-01-2018 at 3:21 PM. Reason: type error
    • brook2jack
    • By brook2jack 9th Jan 18, 6:40 PM
    • 4,070 Posts
    • 3,694 Thanks
    brook2jack
    NHS dentistry is there to secure health not to necessarily give treatment the patient would prefer.

    You cannot “top up “ the NHS payment to get treatment you want , if treatment is appropriate to secure dental health it should be provided on the NHS. However if you want treatments not available on the nhs eg cosmetic treatment then you can pay for this privately.

    In general whether a bridge will be provided on the nhs depends on several factors ,
    How many other teeth are missing
    Is the gap a front tooth
    Is there any gum disease
    Is there active decay
    Are the teeth either side of the gap healthy , with good enough roots do they have existing filling
    Has the person any other oral or general health problems that make a Bridge a bad idea

    Only the dentist who can see you and your x Rays will Ben able to tell you if it is appropriate NHS treatment.
    • junes9333
    • By junes9333 11th Jan 18, 12:20 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    junes9333
    Thank you brook2jack for your informative reply, i am paying privately tomorrow for an upper bridge as my current 1 the gum is receding and needs to be replaced, fair play to the old 1 it's been there 30 years, i have also paid privately for my 2 front teeth to be refilled with new composites behind.
    My lower left teeth are good for a bridge but i am unable to afford any further cost, the reason i am wanting a bridge is because when I eat sharp food such as biscuits etc hurt my gum are and catchesy tongue, i had a denture fitted 7 years ago and it caused nothing but problems.
    • junes9333
    • By junes9333 11th Jan 18, 12:21 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    junes9333
    ***Catches my tongue
    • Ilona
    • By Ilona 11th Jan 18, 1:28 PM
    • 1,993 Posts
    • 6,843 Thanks
    Ilona
    Hello June. brook2jack has given you a good reply, but you mention the word 'biscuit', which has prompted me to reply. My teeth are around 60 years old, (I am 68), and I don't expect to eat the same food as I did when I was younger. I have a four teeth bridge at the front top, and two crowns, and would like to keep what I have left for as long as possible, so I have modified my diet. You can manage without biscuits, they are not food.

    I don't bite into anything hard any more, and try and stick to the softer food so I don't put excess wear on my teeth. For instance I have pasta, couscous, avocado, and a boiled egg for lunch. I still eat healthily, and I also eat slowly, being careful how I break the food down in my mouth. I add nuts to my breakfast, I grind them first in a mini Kenwood chopper. I don't eat meat so nothing to chew there.

    Maybe you could try this approach, it might help.

    Ilona
    I love skip diving
    • brook2jack
    • By brook2jack 11th Jan 18, 1:36 PM
    • 4,070 Posts
    • 3,694 Thanks
    brook2jack
    In general , it is very unlikely you will get a bridge to replace back teeth , particularly molars , on the NHS. The other factor is if there is a large gap , and the fact you have had a denture before indicates this , it makes it even more unlikely.

    There is a concept called the shortened Dental arch , which means that so long as you have 20 teeth in total you are regarded as dentally fit. IE even if you have lost all your back teeth (molars) they do not need to be replaced to make you dentally fit.

    People can manage to eat with no bottom teeth at all as the gums eventually toughen up so do not hold out much hope of you getting a Bridge on the NHS.
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