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  • FIRST POST
    • hybernia
    • By hybernia 14th Jun 17, 4:07 PM
    • 202Posts
    • 175Thanks
    hybernia
    0 WOW
    To plus or not to plus . . . or even, double oh
    • #1
    • 14th Jun 17, 4:07 PM
    0 WOW
    To plus or not to plus . . . or even, double oh 14th Jun 17 at 4:07 PM
    Really do get confused when we're away from these shores and I need to make a phone call on my mobile. Actually, the past two years I've never bothered. So now I'm stuck with this information swirling around my tiny brain:

    From the Spanish company we're renting our car from in Spain: 'In the event of breakdown or accident, please contact as soon as possible. Ring 0034 . . . etc etc.'

    From info received from a friend: 'Just remember, when you're in Spain next month that if you need to ring a Spanish number, the code is +0034, and if you need to ring home for any reason, the code is +0044.'

    I thought all I had to do was dial the plus digit and the two numbers -- +34 for Spain and +44 for the UK -- not have to mess around with dialing double-oh as well?? (Yes, I know, the first zero of the called phone number needs to be ignored whether phoning on a mobile from Spain to Spain or the UK.)

    Silly query I know but if anyone can just tell me?? Thanks.
Page 1
    • glentoran99
    • By glentoran99 14th Jun 17, 4:12 PM
    • 4,293 Posts
    • 3,139 Thanks
    glentoran99
    • #2
    • 14th Jun 17, 4:12 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Jun 17, 4:12 PM
    you are correct, the 00 is in place of the +
    • hybernia
    • By hybernia 14th Jun 17, 5:11 PM
    • 202 Posts
    • 175 Thanks
    hybernia
    • #3
    • 14th Jun 17, 5:11 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Jun 17, 5:11 PM
    Glentoran: many thanks for that! I was beginning to think I'd be better off just staying with postcards.
    • eDicky
    • By eDicky 15th Jun 17, 4:15 AM
    • 2,444 Posts
    • 1,046 Thanks
    eDicky
    • #4
    • 15th Jun 17, 4:15 AM
    • #4
    • 15th Jun 17, 4:15 AM
    In any European country your can use 00 or + (not both) as prefix to the country code. But several other countries don't use 00 as international prefix, such as USA/Canada, and it won't work there.

    So it's better to always use the universal standard, the plus sign, replacing the initial zero of a local number with + and the country code, e.g. +44, +34 etc. This will work in any country worldwide, including your home country such as +44 in UK, so if you store all your contacts in this form you will never have a problem wherever you are.
    • hybernia
    • By hybernia 15th Jun 17, 10:32 AM
    • 202 Posts
    • 175 Thanks
    hybernia
    • #5
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:32 AM
    • #5
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:32 AM
    In any European country your can use 00 or + (not both) as prefix to the country code. . . So it's better to always use the universal standard, the plus sign, replacing the initial zero of a local number with + and the country code, e.g. +44, +34 etc. This will work in any country worldwide, including your home country such as +44 in UK, so if you store all your contacts in this form you will never have a problem wherever you are.
    Originally posted by eDicky
    Thanks for that info! It's obvious I've been in a muddle about these codes for a long time.

    When we got a new landline phone, I actually wondered about making an address book with entries that looked like the way I had seen our phone number occasionally represented, putting +44 in front in place of the first zero.

    But my sister said don't do that, it will affect your BT phone bill, because BT charges less for local calls than national calls.

    If you set up your phone's contacts book with every number with a national prefix then whenever you ring me (we are both on the same local exchange) then you'll pay national rate. To make a local call you mustn't dial any STD code at all.

    I'm now assuming that I've been really silly to carry over that advice to my mobile phone contacts because, of course, there is no such thing as a 'local' number call rate on a mobile, only on a landline.

    I wish I'd asked on here a long time ago for clarification. Thanks so much for your help, I have screen captured the info and saved it.
    • martindow
    • By martindow 15th Jun 17, 10:35 AM
    • 7,038 Posts
    • 3,883 Thanks
    martindow
    • #6
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:35 AM
    • #6
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:35 AM
    Do you have to use 0044 or +44 when phoning the UK from abroad? I'm sure I've just used the UK number - the phone remembers it's English and is on holiday.
    • hybernia
    • By hybernia 15th Jun 17, 3:16 PM
    • 202 Posts
    • 175 Thanks
    hybernia
    • #7
    • 15th Jun 17, 3:16 PM
    • #7
    • 15th Jun 17, 3:16 PM
    Do you have to use 0044 or +44 when phoning the UK from abroad? I'm sure I've just used the UK number - the phone remembers it's English and is on holiday.
    Originally posted by martindow
    Oh lordy. Martin: I don't know. I thought that regardless of the 'nationality' of the phone, the country code was essential.

    But perhaps . . ???
    • eDicky
    • By eDicky 15th Jun 17, 3:41 PM
    • 2,444 Posts
    • 1,046 Thanks
    eDicky
    • #8
    • 15th Jun 17, 3:41 PM
    • #8
    • 15th Jun 17, 3:41 PM
    Do you have to use 0044 or +44 when phoning the UK from abroad? I'm sure I've just used the UK number - the phone remembers it's English and is on holiday.
    Originally posted by martindow
    Perhaps you have an iPhone with 'dial assist' feature that automatically converts a number to international format when necessary. I don't know if it's foolproof in recognising which country code to add, or can only assume the home country.

    There's a highly reviewed app 'Twitch 2! Contacts Formatter' that can convert your whole contacts list to international format. I've not used it myself as my contacts have been entered that way since GSM brought in the standard 25+ years ago.
    • photome
    • By photome 15th Jun 17, 3:43 PM
    • 12,434 Posts
    • 7,938 Thanks
    photome
    • #9
    • 15th Jun 17, 3:43 PM
    • #9
    • 15th Jun 17, 3:43 PM
    Do you have to use 0044 or +44 when phoning the UK from abroad? I'm sure I've just used the UK number - the phone remembers it's English and is on holiday.
    Originally posted by martindow
    I think you have to use +44 from anywhere it may be that you had the number stored in your contacts with the +44 already on
    • EssexExile
    • By EssexExile 15th Jun 17, 3:48 PM
    • 2,179 Posts
    • 1,447 Thanks
    EssexExile
    Google contacts puts in the +44 automatically so I don't have to.
    Tall, dark & handsome. Well two out of three ain't bad.
    • glentoran99
    • By glentoran99 17th Jun 17, 8:28 AM
    • 4,293 Posts
    • 3,139 Thanks
    glentoran99
    Do you have to use 0044 or +44 when phoning the UK from abroad? I'm sure I've just used the UK number - the phone remembers it's English and is on holiday.
    Originally posted by martindow


    Some phones have "dial assist" that sorts that out for you
    • glentoran99
    • By glentoran99 17th Jun 17, 8:28 AM
    • 4,293 Posts
    • 3,139 Thanks
    glentoran99
    In any European country your can use 00 or + (not both) as prefix to the country code. But several other countries don't use 00 as international prefix, such as USA/Canada, and it won't work there.

    So it's better to always use the universal standard, the plus sign, replacing the initial zero of a local number with + and the country code, e.g. +44, +34 etc. This will work in any country worldwide, including your home country such as +44 in UK, so if you store all your contacts in this form you will never have a problem wherever you are.
    Originally posted by eDicky
    ???

    usa is 001
    • redpete
    • By redpete 17th Jun 17, 8:52 AM
    • 4,081 Posts
    • 3,602 Thanks
    redpete
    ???

    usa is 001
    Originally posted by glentoran99
    They mean dialling another country from the USA, not dialling the USA from here.
    loose does not rhyme with choose but lose does and is the word you meant to write.
    • eDicky
    • By eDicky 17th Jun 17, 9:03 AM
    • 2,444 Posts
    • 1,046 Thanks
    eDicky
    ???

    usa is 001
    Originally posted by glentoran99
    You're thinking of making a call TO the USA - yes, from the UK you dial 001 (or +1).

    I was referring to the international prefix to use when you are in one country and are calling
    to another. In the UK and many mother countries it is 00. In the USA it is 011(eg 01144 to UK), so you cannot use 00. But if you use the plus sign before the country code of the country you are calling, it will work from anywhere.
    • MothballsWallet
    • By MothballsWallet 17th Jun 17, 2:43 PM
    • 10,826 Posts
    • 14,024 Thanks
    MothballsWallet
    In any European country your can use 00 or + (not both) as prefix to the country code. But several other countries don't use 00 as international prefix, such as USA/Canada, and it won't work there.

    So it's better to always use the universal standard, the plus sign, replacing the initial zero of a local number with + and the country code, e.g. +44, +34 etc. This will work in any country worldwide, including your home country such as +44 in UK, so if you store all your contacts in this form you will never have a problem wherever you are.
    Originally posted by eDicky
    I second what eDicky's said - the + prefix is an international standard set out as part of the IDD standards.
    Always ask yourself one question: What would Gibbs do?
    Married to an immigrant.
    • hybernia
    • By hybernia 17th Jun 17, 2:55 PM
    • 202 Posts
    • 175 Thanks
    hybernia
    Just a quick (and inadequate) note of thanks, again, to everyone who has helped out here. It probably seemed like a silly little query but I'm maybe easily confused. Thank you all.
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