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    • kimplus8
    • By kimplus8 18th May 17, 4:36 PM
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    kimplus8
    How do you do food budget?
    • #1
    • 18th May 17, 4:36 PM
    How do you do food budget? 18th May 17 at 4:36 PM
    Hi there,
    I'm just wondering how people budget their weekly or monthly food shops. Do you think £20 per adult and £10 per child is enough for the week?
    There is me and 8 kids so I was hoping to have a £100 per week food budget, or is that no way near going to be enough??


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    Last edited by Former MSE Jessica; 30-05-2017 at 2:33 PM.
    Single Momma, Member of £1000 Emergency fund Club Check out my Debt Free Diary
Page 1
    • kimplus8
    • By kimplus8 18th May 17, 4:37 PM
    • 606 Posts
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    kimplus8
    • #2
    • 18th May 17, 4:37 PM
    • #2
    • 18th May 17, 4:37 PM
    Similarly you may think it's too much and I'm overestimating. In which case I welcome your opinion and ideas as I'm desperate to keep it as low as possible for the next 12 months so I can extend my mat leave for my son.
    Single Momma, Member of £1000 Emergency fund Club Check out my Debt Free Diary
    • AndyBSG
    • By AndyBSG 18th May 17, 4:46 PM
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    AndyBSG
    • #3
    • 18th May 17, 4:46 PM
    • #3
    • 18th May 17, 4:46 PM
    Are any of the children in nappies or on formula milk? that will soak up a huge chunk of your budget if so.

    My house is 2 adults a 2 year old still in nappies and a newborn on formula and nappies.

    My weekly shop for that is between £60-£100 a week and includes stuff for my work lunches 5 days a week with pretty much everything cooked from fresh ingredients(very rare we have ready made meals and avoid processed as much as possible)

    The big variance pretty much boils down to if nappies and formula are needed(If I need formula and both need nappies in the same week it adds about£30-£40 to the bill)and once both LO's grow out of those i'm confident I can keep it down to the £60 mark.
    Last edited by AndyBSG; 18-05-2017 at 4:55 PM.
    • arbrighton
    • By arbrighton 18th May 17, 5:16 PM
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    arbrighton
    • #4
    • 18th May 17, 5:16 PM
    • #4
    • 18th May 17, 5:16 PM
    Try going over to the old style board, they'll be able to help
    • kimplus8
    • By kimplus8 18th May 17, 5:48 PM
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    kimplus8
    • #5
    • 18th May 17, 5:48 PM
    • #5
    • 18th May 17, 5:48 PM
    Thanks,
    I use reusable nappies so no need to buy those and I breastfeed so no formula.
    I recon if I'm very careful and plan wisely then it should be do- able
    Single Momma, Member of £1000 Emergency fund Club Check out my Debt Free Diary
    • kimplus8
    • By kimplus8 18th May 17, 5:49 PM
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    kimplus8
    • #6
    • 18th May 17, 5:49 PM
    • #6
    • 18th May 17, 5:49 PM
    I'll pop on the old style boards now
    Single Momma, Member of £1000 Emergency fund Club Check out my Debt Free Diary
    • unholyangel
    • By unholyangel 19th May 17, 2:19 AM
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    unholyangel
    • #7
    • 19th May 17, 2:19 AM
    • #7
    • 19th May 17, 2:19 AM
    Hi there,
    I'm just wondering how people budget their weekly or monthly food shops. Do you think £20 per adult and £10 per child is enough for the week?
    There is me and 8 kids so I was hoping to have a £100 per week food budget, or is that no way near going to be enough??
    Originally posted by kimplus8
    Check with local farms too if there are any nearby - a lot around here sell goods cheaper than you'll find even in budget supermarkets. Theres one that delivers fresh veg to us weekly (enough for a family of 4) for £8. They also do 25kg of potatoes for £5-8 (for maris piper/king edward etc) which would cost around £15-20 in asda or tesco.

    £20 per adult is doable - I spend around £25-30 per adult presently and I don't scrimp, if I want something food wise, I get it - I don't buy much more than we need for the week though (a little extra in case we have visitors). £10 per kid....I suppose that depends what age the kids are.

    Things like pasta, rice, flour can be purchased in bulk or wholesale for cheaper. Same with beans (good source of protein btw) and most dried foods tbh. And imo you should always keep milk, eggs & flour as staples of your pantry. Its amazing the number of things you can make either with those ingredients alone or with a few additional items.


    I believe recipes like stovies came about from families trying to make the more expensive ingredients like meat go further on tight budgets so war era meals might be something to look into for ideas.

    If you were looking to do it more permanently and have use of a good garden, you could also perhaps grow your own veg or keep a couple of chickens. Obviously the former takes time and preparation, the latter requires some initial outlay (ie for the housing) but it would give some learning potential for the kids & chickens also make good pets - kids usually love them.
    Money doesn't solve poverty.....it creates it.
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 19th May 17, 9:20 AM
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    hazyjo
    • #8
    • 19th May 17, 9:20 AM
    • #8
    • 19th May 17, 9:20 AM
    You've got 8 kids already so surely must have some idea of what you've been spending? It's not like you're saying 'I'd love to have 8 kids one day, how much would they cost me...'.


    Do you have a big freezer where you can batch cook and freeze into portions?


    Definitely stick with the cheaper supermarkets but don't get carried away, buy what you need. Stick to a shopping list.


    Jx
    2017 wins: Opera tickets; film preview; lipstick; Ideal Home Show tickets + afternoon tea & bottle of Champagne; 2 cases of NKD; notebook; bath rack; books; film Premiere; Broadchurch DVDs; lipbalms; hamper (food/wine/Echo Dot/Jo Malone goodies)
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 19th May 17, 11:51 AM
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    PasturesNew
    • #9
    • 19th May 17, 11:51 AM
    • #9
    • 19th May 17, 11:51 AM
    Your budget is "loads".

    Just be aware of everything you are buying, the price, your options - and be prepared to walk away from food that is "too pricey".

    Your budget is "loads" .... but you need to be price aware. Want beans on toast? You could spend £1 on a tin of beans and buy a nice organic loaf for £1.50 ... or you can get a 4-pack of own brand beans for £1 and buy the supermarket own brand loaf for 40p.

    Don't buy things because the packet looks pretty, or because you saw it online or in a magazine... question what you're actually buying, how much they want - and if that's cost effective for you and if you really need THAT version, THAT brand, THAT price.

    I LOVE Pukka pies .... but I will never buy one at the chippy (£2.50), nor at full price in the supermarket (£2). I will go without until they're for sale at £1 at the supermarket and reheat it myself.

    No point throwing it away if all you need is a bit of price awareness and active decision making over what you're prepared to pay for and buy.

    Even simple things like frozen carrot/swede mash can make a difference. Buy a bag of that in one supermarket it's 25p/100g. Buy the veggies separate and mash them yourself and it's 10p/100g.
    You're paying for presentation, when it's not always needed.
    • loey93
    • By loey93 19th May 17, 12:27 PM
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    loey93
    I'm single and I budget £30.00 PW on groceries and £20.00 PM on general household cleaning and toiletries.

    I mainly shop at Aldi for my food shop and Wilkos or Poundland for cleaning and toiletries :-)

    When I was with my ex we used to spend about £500.00 a month on food etc. between the 2 of us !! :O I used to think this was normal! It's only since I've been single that I've realised this was ridiculous !
    Aiming to pay debts & save!
    • Fireflyaway
    • By Fireflyaway 19th May 17, 1:01 PM
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    Fireflyaway
    If you keep the meals simple and don't buy lots of expensive brands I think you could do it. Pasta, tinned tomatoes, beans and loads of veggies / rice are all cheap and go a long way. I think its meat that's costly but the other day I went to the butcher and got loads of stuff much cheaper than the supermarket. Got freezer bags and divided it all into batches.
    My calculations seem to say your budget would work out about £1.50 per person per day. That seems quite tight. What do you spend now? Could you cut down on something else and increase the food budget a bit? Nothing worse than not having enough food / food you like.
    • kimplus8
    • By kimplus8 19th May 17, 4:52 PM
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    kimplus8
    thanks so much for your idea and advice.
    I don't really know how much ive been spending previously as I tended to do lots of top up shops and give the kids money here and there etc, now im serious about getting sorted so im planning down to the last penny.
    I checked the older style money saving boards and ive woken up an old thread I made on herelast year regarding value/saver items.
    I think £100 a week should work well if I allow for the fact that some weeks it will be less an the weeks that I need to bulk buy staples, it will be more. however I will draw out the £100 in cash so once its gone we will have to make do.
    Single Momma, Member of £1000 Emergency fund Club Check out my Debt Free Diary
    • kimplus8
    • By kimplus8 19th May 17, 4:58 PM
    • 606 Posts
    • 1,970 Thanks
    kimplus8
    Your budget is "loads".

    Don't buy things because the packet looks pretty, or because you saw it online or in a magazine... question what you're actually buying, how much they want - and if that's cost effective for you and if you really need THAT version, THAT brand, THAT price.

    I LOVE Pukka pies .... but I will never buy one at the chippy (£2.50), nor at full price in the supermarket (£2). I will go without until they're for sale at £1 at the supermarket and reheat it myself.

    .
    Originally posted by PasturesNew
    now I really fancy a pukka pie
    I don't tend to buy already prepped food anyway unless its in the reduced/oops isle.
    I buy meat and fish in the reduced/oops isle and freeze it with the exception of quorn fillets which I tend to buy when its BOGOF.
    You are right about the beans on toast tho, I am a lover of Heinz but recent got branstons on the 2 for 50p offer in my local farmfoods. they tasted fine, I couldn't taste any difference and I don't ever buy posh bread unless its reduced/oops in my local coop.
    Im actually quite excited about this and see it as a challenge.
    Single Momma, Member of £1000 Emergency fund Club Check out my Debt Free Diary
    • kimplus8
    • By kimplus8 19th May 17, 5:03 PM
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    kimplus8
    If you keep the meals simple and don't buy lots of expensive brands I think you could do it. Pasta, tinned tomatoes, beans and loads of veggies / rice are all cheap and go a long way. I think its meat that's costly but the other day I went to the butcher and got loads of stuff much cheaper than the supermarket. Got freezer bags and divided it all into batches.
    My calculations seem to say your budget would work out about £1.50 per person per day. That seems quite tight. What do you spend now? Could you cut down on something else and increase the food budget a bit? Nothing worse than not having enough food / food you like.
    Originally posted by Fireflyaway
    the only thing I could cut is the kids swimming lessons BUT........ we live in devon and I think it is really important that they are able to swim.
    when I was a child I fell into the river ex right by a weer (sp?) and had I not been able to swim out of the current I would have drowned.
    It may seem silly but its a real fear of mine so im happy to cut the food budget and have boring meal plans for the next year or so to keep their swimming. We don't have a tv and everything else we do is free or with vouchers ive won. they don't do any other clubs so It neeeeeed to work at £100 a week.
    Single Momma, Member of £1000 Emergency fund Club Check out my Debt Free Diary
    • Spendless
    • By Spendless 19th May 17, 6:30 PM
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    Spendless
    Keep your swimming Kim. The only thing I regret with mine with swimming lessons, especially for my youngest is that I didn't stop them when they could swim. Instead I carried on with them going up the grades, often for very long periods of time before they moved on to the next group, costing me loads of money.

    Perhaps a suggestion might be to cost per person per meal, to see how the budget works out eg you have a breastfeeding baby, so his allocation is currently nil. If you have Infant school aged children and I think the free meals for those years is currently running, that amount is also nil, in term-time and more in school hols. If you did that you might see how your overall amount works out.
    • WibblyGirly
    • By WibblyGirly 19th May 17, 6:34 PM
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    WibblyGirly
    We put it all in the trolly and guess the total at the till. Usually its around £70 for 2 of us. We do meal plans and look at what we already have that we can use again but we're really bad at just adding a few extras in as if they are on offer.
    • LilElvis
    • By LilElvis 19th May 17, 7:50 PM
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    LilElvis
    When I was a student I used to go to the market at the end of the day when they were packing up and buy fruit and veg for a fraction of their original price - even cheaper than the supermarket reductions.
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 19th May 17, 10:27 PM
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    It also depends on how old your children are - if they're going up in age by a year or thereabouts at a time like a set of Russian Dolls, the biggest you've got is not yet into their prepuberty growth spurt yet. If they're at assorted intervals, you could have a small 11 year old boy who is about to eat all the food all the time and shoot up to over six foot tall between the ages of 13 and 16 and a half.

    And, obviously, teenagers need different food amounts (eg, calories from fat, calories from carbs, protein for rapid growth) than four year olds. It's also relevant whether your kids are teeny little things with bones like birds or are on the country bred stock side - as the OH tells me, he's a Dartmoor lad born and bred - strong in the arm and thick in the 'ed (yes, I know it's been nicked from elsewhere, but he certainly has broader shoulders for his height than most people I know who are much, much taller - and he can pack on muscle without any effort).

    If they're always wanting more and more sweet things and starches and they're definitely the right size (ie, not having to wear clothes three to five years older than them to fit their tummies and bums - and no boy moobs or tummy overhangs in sight), it might help to up the protein content to keep them feeling fuller longer - adding a couple of tins of chickpeas and some leaves to a chicken curry, for example, or opting for a higher protein flour if making cakes or snacks/pancakes - two tins of chickpeas are no more than £1.50 if organic (the massive tins in the shops in ethnic food sections can be as cheap as 30p if you're not into soaking and boiling dried ones for mere pennies) compared to several pounds for chicken breast that would make the other half of the curry, for example.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

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    Originally posted by colinw
    • kimplus8
    • By kimplus8 20th May 17, 9:08 PM
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    kimplus8
    It also depends on how old your children are - if they're going up in age by a year or thereabouts at a time like a set of Russian Dolls, the biggest you've got is not yet into their prepuberty growth spurt yet. If they're at assorted intervals, you could have a small 11 year old boy who is about to eat all the food all the time and shoot up to over six foot tall between the ages of 13 and 16 and a half.

    And, obviously, teenagers need different food amounts (eg, calories from fat, calories from carbs, protein for rapid growth) than four year olds. It's also relevant whether your kids are teeny little things with bones like birds or are on the country bred stock side - as the OH tells me, he's a Dartmoor lad born and bred - strong in the arm and thick in the 'ed (yes, I know it's been nicked from elsewhere, but he certainly has broader shoulders for his height than most people I know who are much, much taller - and he can pack on muscle without any effort).

    If they're always wanting more and more sweet things and starches and they're definitely the right size (ie, not having to wear clothes three to five years older than them to fit their tummies and bums - and no boy moobs or tummy overhangs in sight), it might help to up the protein content to keep them feeling fuller longer - adding a couple of tins of chickpeas and some leaves to a chicken curry, for example, or opting for a higher protein flour if making cakes or snacks/pancakes - two tins of chickpeas are no more than £1.50 if organic (the massive tins in the shops in ethnic food sections can be as cheap as 30p if you're not into soaking and boiling dried ones for mere pennies) compared to several pounds for chicken breast that would make the other half of the curry, for example.
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    we are near Dartmoor- such a beautiful place to live.
    Single Momma, Member of £1000 Emergency fund Club Check out my Debt Free Diary
    • GarthThomas
    • By GarthThomas 20th May 17, 9:19 PM
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    GarthThomas
    Yes, it's important that your children can swim, but that takes a couple of hours per child, once each.

    As above, the question makes little sense, make some meal plans, work out the costs, stick to that. There's no point asking what others budget, no-one else here has eight children on a limited budget. The fact is yours will probably have to go without a great many things that other families find normal.
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