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  • FIRST POST
    • Relbs
    • By Relbs 18th Apr 17, 1:31 PM
    • 24Posts
    • 3Thanks
    Relbs
    Trying to cancel broadband when moving into care home
    • #1
    • 18th Apr 17, 1:31 PM
    Trying to cancel broadband when moving into care home 18th Apr 17 at 1:31 PM
    My mum has been diagnosed with terminal cancer and has had to move a nursing home as she is not well enough to live alone. I phoned BT to cancel her broadband and TV package; they have said it can't be cancelled as she is only 12 months into a 24 month contract- if I cancel it there will be a £215 charge.
    They did ask if she couldn't take it with her- I said no, I don't think nursing homes let you set up your own broadband /TV.
    If she dies it will be cancelled without charge but as she is still alive there is a charge to cancel.
    Just wondered if anyone has experience of this and anyway to cancel without charges? It doesn't seem fair when she's had to move due to serious illness.
    Thanks.
Page 1
    • J B
    • By J B 18th Apr 17, 6:49 PM
    • 2,373 Posts
    • 768 Thanks
    J B
    • #2
    • 18th Apr 17, 6:49 PM
    • #2
    • 18th Apr 17, 6:49 PM
    I used to do voluntary 'computer training' at the local 'old folks home' and the guy there had his own phone and internet in his room.
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 18th Apr 17, 9:38 PM
    • 7,588 Posts
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    Owain Moneysaver
    • #3
    • 18th Apr 17, 9:38 PM
    • #3
    • 18th Apr 17, 9:38 PM
    You could leave it a couple of weeks, then lie and tell them she's died. They don't ask for sight of a death certificate. Horrible thing to have to do though in the circumstances.

    http://bt.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/9845/~/bereavement-of-bt-account-holder

    However I would put in a formal complaint that enforcing their cancellation charge does not reflect their losses in terminating the contract early and in these circumstances (where the customer is not voluntarily leaving to another supplier or can easily take the contract to a new address) is an unfair contract term.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • Moneyineptitude
    • By Moneyineptitude 18th Apr 17, 11:14 PM
    • 18,870 Posts
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    Moneyineptitude
    • #4
    • 18th Apr 17, 11:14 PM
    • #4
    • 18th Apr 17, 11:14 PM
    You could leave it a couple of weeks, then lie and tell them she's died.
    Originally posted by Owain Moneysaver
    This would be fraudulent, of course.

    Not recommended.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 20th Apr 17, 6:57 PM
    • 8,606 Posts
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    teddysmum
    • #5
    • 20th Apr 17, 6:57 PM
    • #5
    • 20th Apr 17, 6:57 PM
    If she has no assets, just don't pay, as they will not be able to take her pension money as that goes to pay for care.
    • Moneyineptitude
    • By Moneyineptitude 20th Apr 17, 7:58 PM
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    Moneyineptitude
    • #6
    • 20th Apr 17, 7:58 PM
    • #6
    • 20th Apr 17, 7:58 PM
    If she has no assets, just don't pay, as they will not be able to take her pension money as that goes to pay for care.
    Originally posted by teddysmum
    This assumes the person in question is a pensioner, but the OP says she is going into care because she has terminal cancer which can occur at any age.

    It's never wise simply not paying. Why attract debt problems and worries unnecessarily? Especially as the person is soon going to be very ill.
    at the local 'old folks home' and the guy there had his own phone and internet in his room.
    Originally posted by J B
    This looks like a better option than simply paying a £200 cancellation fee.
    Last edited by Moneyineptitude; 20-04-2017 at 8:01 PM.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 21st Apr 17, 8:11 PM
    • 8,606 Posts
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    teddysmum
    • #7
    • 21st Apr 17, 8:11 PM
    • #7
    • 21st Apr 17, 8:11 PM
    This assumes the person in question is a pensioner, but the OP says she is going into care because she has terminal cancer which can occur at any age.

    It's never wise simply not paying. Why attract debt problems and worries unnecessarily? Especially as the person is soon going to be very ill.

    This looks like a better option than simply paying a £200 cancellation fee.
    Originally posted by Moneyineptitude


    The debt would be the lady's ,not the OP's and unfortunately the former will no longer care.
    • Buzby
    • By Buzby 23rd Apr 17, 2:47 PM
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    Buzby
    • #8
    • 23rd Apr 17, 2:47 PM
    • #8
    • 23rd Apr 17, 2:47 PM
    Yes, she could transfer service to the care hone, however this would restart the minimum terms again, so hardly a 'solution'.
    • Moneyineptitude
    • By Moneyineptitude 23rd Apr 17, 9:42 PM
    • 18,870 Posts
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    Moneyineptitude
    • #9
    • 23rd Apr 17, 9:42 PM
    • #9
    • 23rd Apr 17, 9:42 PM
    Yes, she could transfer service to the care hone, however this would restart the minimum terms again, so hardly a 'solution'.
    Originally posted by Buzby
    Imminent death will automatically cancel any such minimum term, so very much a solution which saves a £200 early cancellation fee.
    • Buzby
    • By Buzby 25th Apr 17, 12:59 PM
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    • 2,980 Thanks
    Buzby
    Imminent death? Hardly - it is still a liability on the estate. Death is guaranteed, a waiver is welcome but not guaranteed. If the move took place and a request to cease 4 weeks later, I doubt you'd find them so forgiving. Unless you can point to a clause that states there is automatic cancellation with no penalties on death?
    • JLS3405
    • By JLS3405 28th Apr 17, 11:43 AM
    • 56 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    JLS3405
    BT should have a policy for people going into care homes and this also should apply to people in the Army/RAF etc that then can leave within the contract for free. TalkTalk do. Usually in the case of the death they take any monies owed from the estate, if any. I would call back up and speak to some one else, if you don't get anywhere raise it as an official complaint and to CEO
    • Colin_Maybe
    • By Colin_Maybe 28th Apr 17, 1:14 PM
    • 1,378 Posts
    • 587 Thanks
    Colin_Maybe
    My mum has been diagnosed with terminal cancer and has had to move a nursing home as she is not well enough to live alone. I phoned BT to cancel her broadband and TV package; they have said it can't be cancelled as she is only 12 months into a 24 month contract- if I cancel it there will be a £215 charge.
    They did ask if she couldn't take it with her- I said no, I don't think nursing homes let you set up your own broadband /TV.
    If she dies it will be cancelled without charge but as she is still alive there is a charge to cancel.
    Just wondered if anyone has experience of this and anyway to cancel without charges? It doesn't seem fair when she's had to move due to serious illness.
    Thanks.
    Originally posted by Relbs
    I'd try a letter to:

    Customer Service Manager
    BT Customer Correspondence Centre
    Providence Row
    Durham
    DH98 1BT

    I think you'd have more luck since you're putting it in writing.
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