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  • FIRST POST
    • AdventureRocks
    • By AdventureRocks 18th Oct 16, 11:54 AM
    • 115Posts
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    AdventureRocks
    New driver questions on clutch help please don't want to burn it out..
    • #1
    • 18th Oct 16, 11:54 AM
    New driver questions on clutch help please don't want to burn it out.. 18th Oct 16 at 11:54 AM
    I don't want to burn out my clutch and I am a little rusty on driving.

    So at traffic lights when waiting can I leave it in first with clutch down with brake on or is that bad for clutch?

    When breaking is putting the clutch all the way down and breaking at the same time bad? Should I break then put clutch in at last minute?

    Also on hill starts does everyone roll a little bit backwards? I am putting handbrake on building up revs then relasing hand break..

    Appreciate your help
Page 1
    • DoaM
    • By DoaM 18th Oct 16, 11:59 AM
    • 1,013 Posts
    • 921 Thanks
    DoaM
    • #2
    • 18th Oct 16, 11:59 AM
    • #2
    • 18th Oct 16, 11:59 AM
    At traffic lights, unless I know I'm only going to be waiting a couple of seconds I always use the handbrake and select neutral (so release the clutch).

    When I'm braking I also change gears so that engine braking also assists, and fully depress the clutch pedal only when coming to a stop.

    If you roll back a little on a hill start, you're doing it wrong. You should never roll back - and this would probably give you a "minor" mark on a driving test.
    Last edited by DoaM; 18-10-2016 at 12:49 PM. Reason: Spelling ... braking not breaking :-)
    Diary of a madman
    Walk the line again today
    Entries of confusion
    Dear diary, I'm here to stay
    • tykesi
    • By tykesi 18th Oct 16, 12:01 PM
    • 1,407 Posts
    • 1,768 Thanks
    tykesi
    • #3
    • 18th Oct 16, 12:01 PM
    • #3
    • 18th Oct 16, 12:01 PM
    I don't want to burn out my clutch and I am a little rusty on driving.

    So at traffic lights when waiting can I leave it in first with clutch down with brake on or is that bad for clutch? If you're waiting for more than just a few seconds you should be in neutral with the handbrake up and not on the brake OR the clutch - almost nobody does this though and so long as the clutch is all the way down you won't do any damage

    When breaking is putting the clutch all the way down and breaking at the same time bad? Should I break then put clutch in at last minute? It is bad but for a different reason to your question about the clutch. If you are ’braking’ you should also be in gear and coming down the gears in order really. By being in gear you are getting the benefit of engine ’braking which keeps the car under more control than just the brakes. If you have the clutch in whilst ’braking again, so long as it is all the way down there won’t be any damage.

    Also on hill starts does everyone roll a little bit backwards? I am putting handbrake on building up revs then relasing hand break.. With good clutch control you should not roll back, if you are you need to practice on different gradients to get used to the feel of your car and how the clutch behaves. This will only come with practice really.

    Appreciate your help
    Originally posted by AdventureRocks
    Probably differing opinions on all this but these are my opinion.
    • AdventureRocks
    • By AdventureRocks 18th Oct 16, 12:02 PM
    • 115 Posts
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    AdventureRocks
    • #4
    • 18th Oct 16, 12:02 PM
    • #4
    • 18th Oct 16, 12:02 PM
    Thanks!

    Hopefully I haven't done any damage only been driving the car 3 days!

    I need a lot of practice
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 18th Oct 16, 12:02 PM
    • 4,207 Posts
    • 4,221 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    • #5
    • 18th Oct 16, 12:02 PM
    • #5
    • 18th Oct 16, 12:02 PM
    If you have a manual car you should put it in neutral at traffic lights.
    It wont actually be bad for the clutch if you did what you proposed as long as its fully depressed, but were someone to hit you from behind*, whats going going to happen is, your foot will come off clutch and car will leap forward, most likely into car in front,worst case into incoming or crossing traffic, and in either case making a bad situation worse.

    On a hill start, you need to practice, you should not drop backwards (and I believe thats a fail on the test?) You need to coordinate releasing clutch and handbrake.

    * they might fail to stop, or they might anticipate the lights and go forward ahead of you moving.
    • sk240
    • By sk240 18th Oct 16, 12:29 PM
    • 418 Posts
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    sk240
    • #6
    • 18th Oct 16, 12:29 PM
    • #6
    • 18th Oct 16, 12:29 PM
    Im afraid i disagree with the holding of the clutch pedel down not causing any damege, as quite often its the thrust bearing that wears out and not the clutchg itself.
    When your foot is on the clutch, it transfers all of that load onto the thrust bearing....
    • loskie
    • By loskie 18th Oct 16, 12:49 PM
    • 928 Posts
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    loskie
    • #7
    • 18th Oct 16, 12:49 PM
    • #7
    • 18th Oct 16, 12:49 PM
    sounds like you should bite the bullet and take a driving refresher lesson.
    https://www.bsm.co.uk/learner-driver/refreshers-lessons

    I had a half day IAM one through work last year and quite enjoyed it. I am 44 and drive around 20000m per year 60000m per year in my early to mid 20's.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 18th Oct 16, 12:50 PM
    • 12,139 Posts
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    AdrianC
    • #8
    • 18th Oct 16, 12:50 PM
    • #8
    • 18th Oct 16, 12:50 PM
    Is it worth booking a refresher lesson with an instructor?

    If you're "rusty" on something so basic as clutch control, what else are you "rusty" on when it comes to the finer details of playing nicely with other traffic...?
    • jimjames
    • By jimjames 18th Oct 16, 1:06 PM
    • 10,851 Posts
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    jimjames
    • #9
    • 18th Oct 16, 1:06 PM
    • #9
    • 18th Oct 16, 1:06 PM
    When breaking is putting the clutch all the way down and breaking at the same time bad? Should I break then put clutch in at last minute?
    Originally posted by AdventureRocks
    I'd also be very careful. If you've only just got the car the last thing you want to be doing is breaking it
    Remember the saying: if it looks too good to be true it almost certainly is.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 18th Oct 16, 1:11 PM
    • 4,207 Posts
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    AnotherJoe
    Im afraid i disagree with the holding of the clutch pedel down not causing any damege, as quite often its the thrust bearing that wears out and not the clutchg itself.
    When your foot is on the clutch, it transfers all of that load onto the thrust bearing....
    Originally posted by sk240
    So, even an old g** like me can learn new stuff then! I stand corrected.
    • dogshome
    • By dogshome 18th Oct 16, 1:20 PM
    • 2,660 Posts
    • 1,331 Thanks
    dogshome
    Never keep the clutch depressed when stationary, always slip into nuetral

    You are not harming the clutch by keeping it depressed, but you are massively increasing the wear on the Thrust Bearing which operates the clutch - This is a simple part that doesn't cost much, but changeing it involves nearly as much labour and cost as replaceing the entire clutch.

    My ancient Pug 406 I keep as a caravan tug has just clocked 160,000 miles and it's running on the original clutch
    • AdventureRocks
    • By AdventureRocks 18th Oct 16, 1:37 PM
    • 115 Posts
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    AdventureRocks
    Never keep the clutch depressed when stationary, always slip into nuetral

    You are not harming the clutch by keeping it depressed, but you are massively increasing the wear on the Thrust Bearing which operates the clutch - This is a simple part that doesn't cost much, but changeing it involves nearly as much labour and cost as replaceing the entire clutch.

    My ancient Pug 406 I keep as a caravan tug has just clocked 160,000 miles and it's running on the original clutch
    Originally posted by dogshome
    I have been doing this for about 30 miles will i have done much damage? i will correct myself now
    • kmb500
    • By kmb500 18th Oct 16, 1:37 PM
    • 75 Posts
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    kmb500
    wait you are not meant to put the clutch down when you brake?
    • AdventureRocks
    • By AdventureRocks 18th Oct 16, 1:37 PM
    • 115 Posts
    • 10 Thanks
    AdventureRocks
    sounds like you should bite the bullet and take a driving refresher lesson.
    https://www.bsm.co.uk/learner-driver/refreshers-lessons

    I had a half day IAM one through work last year and quite enjoyed it. I am 44 and drive around 20000m per year 60000m per year in my early to mid 20's.
    Originally posted by loskie
    Thank you i will look into these!

    How much did they roughly cost you ?
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 18th Oct 16, 1:38 PM
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    AdrianC
    wait you are not meant to put the clutch down when you brake?
    Originally posted by kmb500
    Umm, you have passed your test, right?
    • kmb500
    • By kmb500 18th Oct 16, 1:45 PM
    • 75 Posts
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    kmb500
    Umm, you have passed your test, right?
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    When I first started driving I think I tried braking without the clutch down but I don't trust it not to stall or go wrong if you brake in gear. That's weird.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 18th Oct 16, 1:54 PM
    • 12,139 Posts
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    AdrianC
    When I first started driving I think I tried braking without the clutch down but I don't trust it not to stall or go wrong if you brake in gear. That's weird.
    Originally posted by kmb500
    I'm very scared now.
    • kmb500
    • By kmb500 18th Oct 16, 1:57 PM
    • 75 Posts
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    kmb500
    I'm very scared now.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    I have driven 40,000 miles, I've been braking wrong this whole time?
    I'm gonna try this on the drive home later.


    I thought you always needed to either have the accelerator down or the clutch down..?
    If you are at standstill and you put the car in first and release the clutch, it stalls. Why is this any different?
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 18th Oct 16, 2:11 PM
    • 12,139 Posts
    • 10,514 Thanks
    AdrianC
    I have driven 40,000 miles, I've been braking wrong this whole time?
    I'm gonna try this on the drive home later.

    If you are at standstill and you put the car in first and release the clutch, it stalls. Why is this any different?
    Originally posted by kmb500
    OK, let's go back a step or three...

    The clutch connects the engine to the gearbox.
    The gearbox gives you a choice of ratios between the speed of the engine and the speed of the wheels.
    The only time you do not want the engine and gearbox connected is when you are changing gear, or you are stationary and in gear. The rest of the time, you should choose the right gear for the road speed and conditions.

    The accelerator pedal is the main way you adjust your road speed. You use it to increase your speed, you use it to decrease your speed, you use it to keep your speed steady.
    The brake pedal is a fall-back for when you need to decrease your speed more rapidly than simply easing off the accelerator will allow. If you're driving smoothly and your observation is adequate, then you will rarely need it except at low speeds.

    If you are within a range of road speeds for which a particular gear is suitable, then get off the clutch.
    If you are accelerating or slowing, then use the clutch to change gear at appropriate times. But, apart from that, get off the clutch.
    If you are decelerating to a gentle halt, then change gear as you go, and use the clutch when the speed drops below first gear's acceptable speeds - as you come to a halt, in other words. But, apart from that, get off the clutch.
    If you are braking hard to a rapid halt, then the same, but you won't have time to slow through the gears, so the speed at which you use the clutch will be higher. But, apart from that, get off the clutch.

    This is the sort of stuff your instructor would have covered in your first few driving lessons, quite probably in a nice quiet car park or industrial estate with very little traffic, and you would have mastered before you started learning how to play with other traffic.

    I thought you always needed to either have the accelerator down or the clutch down..?
    <blink> Seriously?
    • kmb500
    • By kmb500 18th Oct 16, 2:32 PM
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    kmb500
    This is the sort of stuff your instructor would have covered in your first few driving lessons, quite probably in a nice quiet car park or industrial estate with very little traffic, and you would have mastered before you started learning how to play with other traffic.



    <blink> Seriously?
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    Hmm. I use the clutch all the time, when I accelerate I balance it out with the clutch, and when I brake I have the clutch fully down. I worry that the car will stall. Like I said, if you're in first and you just take your foot off the clutch too quickly doesn't it stall?


    I have always driven like this. My instructor never said I had a problem with it. I can drive perfectly competently. I guess it's just a different style of driving.
    I'm gonna pop out in my car now for a few mins just to see what you mean.
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