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  • shazpea
    • #2
    • 5th Dec 12, 8:51 AM
    window quilts
    • #2
    • 5th Dec 12, 8:51 AM
    Thank you so much for this post! I've been wanting to make some kind of blanket for the window but was concerned about the condensation problem, etc, so this is great! Sometimes the flat feels colder than the outside!
  • mapcr77
    • #3
    • 5th Dec 12, 10:05 AM
    • #3
    • 5th Dec 12, 10:05 AM
    Does this help against condensation in the windows, or does that confine condensation to behind the window quilt? My windows suffer terribly with it, dripping down in cold mornings. Thanks!
  • Alf1esmum
    • #4
    • 5th Dec 12, 11:31 AM
    Excellent
    • #4
    • 5th Dec 12, 11:31 AM
    Thanks so much for the excellent share having just moved into an old cottage I will be looking at this with a lot of interest!
  • grump
    • #5
    • 5th Dec 12, 12:34 PM
    Help how to hang them
    • #5
    • 5th Dec 12, 12:34 PM
    Sounds good but I am not sure how I can fix them. I have an angled bay window so would have to make 3 quilts. There is no space above the pvc double glazed window to put a batten and I dont want to drill into the UPVC itself. Can anyone help?
    The "ceiling" over the bay window is just plaster board. I have thought about a sort of roller blind set up but am not sure if the quilt would prove too thick for this to work.
  • macavity
    • #6
    • 5th Dec 12, 12:47 PM
    • #6
    • 5th Dec 12, 12:47 PM
    thanks for this, ive just bought 2 fleeces and some mylar blankets and im going to experiment. the sitting room only has one badly placed storage heater and gets very cold and i'm loathe to use the bar fire due to the cost. i hope this will help a bit.
  • lobbyludd
    • #7
    • 5th Dec 12, 1:58 PM
    • #7
    • 5th Dec 12, 1:58 PM
    Hi
    last year I made (but have only just hung) roman blinds that are underneath my floor length curtain for the bay window. They are a sandwhich of lining, thermal blackout lining (vapour barier) interlining then facing fabric.

    They are great and have made a massive difference to the warmth of the living room
    A/give up smoking (done)
    • Seakay
    • By Seakay 5th Dec 12, 2:24 PM
    • 4,122 Posts
    • 9,916 Thanks
    Seakay
    • #8
    • 5th Dec 12, 2:24 PM
    • #8
    • 5th Dec 12, 2:24 PM
    Sounds good but I am not sure how I can fix them. I have an angled bay window so would have to make 3 quilts. There is no space above the pvc double glazed window to put a batten and I dont want to drill into the UPVC itself. Can anyone help?
    The "ceiling" over the bay window is just plaster board. I have thought about a sort of roller blind set up but am not sure if the quilt would prove too thick for this to work.
    Originally posted by grump
    would some sort of stick and sew Velcro work? Stuck to the frame and sewed to the quilt.
  • dlni
    • #9
    • 5th Dec 12, 3:00 PM
    • #9
    • 5th Dec 12, 3:00 PM
    Was thinking about doing this too until I thought about the foam insulation boards with foil on either side. Fitted them to the windows, not as pretty as the quilts though! The vertical blinds hide them from the outside and the curtains hide them on the inside. Go to work during the week so don't touch them, but remove bathroom, kitchen and large window in sitting room during the day during the weekend to let light in.

    The house is now easier and quicker to heat but

    Downside is.. as the windows are now freezing the any warm air that sneeks onto the windows are immediately turned into condensation, so during the very cold nights lots of water to wipe off. Will have to purchase a dehumidifier to counteract that .. after Christmas as I'm now broke (Christmas presents)
    • Meadows
    • By Meadows 5th Dec 12, 3:08 PM
    • 4,324 Posts
    • 10,214 Thanks
    Meadows
    Downside is.. as the windows are now freezing the any warm air that sneeks onto the windows are immediately turned into condensation, so during the very cold nights lots of water to wipe off. Will have to purchase a dehumidifier to counteract that .. after Christmas as I'm now broke (Christmas presents)
    Originally posted by dlni

    Xpelair EverDri LongLife Ultra DC

    http://www.cnmonline.co.uk/Xpelair-EverDri-LongLife-Ultra-DC-pr-38003.html

    The Ever-Dri long life ultra system is based on a continuous supply of fresh, dry air into the home, with positive input ventilation. The effects of the moisture created by everyday living can quickly lead to the deterioration of the fabric of a building. Cooking, washing, showering and breathing all create water vapor up to 9ltrs for a family of four per day. Without a home being able to breathe, this moisture has nowhere to go mould growth on cooler surfaces like window frames and in unventilated spaces like cupbourds, wardrobes not only does this look bad, it can be bad for your health. If the incoming air falls below 10C, an inbuilt 500watt air tempering heater will automatically activate and shall pulse On/Off to maintain the air at 10C. The Ever fan will automatically suspend operation if the temperature rises above 25C and re-continue when the temperature falls below that point, continuously monitor the incoming air temperature and will automatically adjust the performance of the fan if the temperature rises above or falls below 19C.

    The LongLife low energy DC motor contained in the system is permanent switched on and automatically temperature regulated to ensure continual air quality. There are five house settings to choose from, small, average, large, extra large and summer setting, supplied with ducting and diffuser plates!
    ♦ ☼ ♦ ☼ ♦ ☼ ♦ Meadows ♦ ☼ ♦ ☼ ♦ ☼ ♦
    Sometimes - you can't make it on your own!
    ♦ ☼ ♦ ☼ ♦ ☼ ♦
    When man to man is so unjust in deed or word you should not trust.
    Take my advise, never ask to borrow but pay today and trust tomorrow!
    • Shropshirelass
    • By Shropshirelass 5th Dec 12, 5:19 PM
    • 183 Posts
    • 2,549 Thanks
    Shropshirelass
    Thank you so much for this conversation everyone, lots of ideas, very interesting and will need to research and think about it!
  • domari
    Hi Annie, These sound brilliant!
    I've looked through all the links above and I'm having difficulty understanding them.
    I'm pretty sure I would need a vapour barrier as I do get a lot of condensation anyway.
    Could you please just tell me;
    1. how many layers of fabric do I need?
    2. What type of fabric/plastic must each layer consist of? Starting with the layer nearest the glass please.
    Thank you lots
    They call me Mr Pig!
  • domari
    Hi, me again, could someone please tell me how to thank someone for a post?
    They call me Mr Pig!
  • domari
    Me again! sorry this is my first attempt at using the boards. Could someone please tell me what is mylar?
    They call me Mr Pig!
  • u751904
    did you buy some of that technical material lining that they were talking about? I did see that reflective material that they sell in b&q and wondered about sewing it in as a interlining.
    • lostinrates
    • By lostinrates 5th Dec 12, 8:30 PM
    • 54,265 Posts
    • 341,504 Thanks
    lostinrates
    Hi, me again, could someone please tell me how to thank someone for a post?
    Originally posted by domari
    There is a little 'button' saying thanks under the post you want to thank. Just click on it and it will thank the person.
    • lostinrates
    • By lostinrates 5th Dec 12, 8:33 PM
    • 54,265 Posts
    • 341,504 Thanks
    lostinrates
    I have a pair of very heavily insulated curtains with reflective interlining, presumably that's the same sort of effect?

    As regards the heat escape issue at the top, bottom and sides of curatains that's where I struggle ....I prefer curtain poles to heavy pelmets, but....I have shutters at some of the windows, and presumably they do tis 'seal' so that heavily interlined curtains with the reflective interlining can perform at their best in this same way?
  • Stampede
    fixing into plaster boards.
    Sounds good but I am not sure how I can fix them. I have an angled bay window so would have to make 3 quilts. There is no space above the pvc double glazed window to put a batten and I dont want to drill into the UPVC itself. Can anyone help?
    The "ceiling" over the bay window is just plaster board. I have thought about a sort of roller blind set up but am not sure if the quilt would prove too thick for this to work.
    Originally posted by grump
    For fixing into plaster board many folks think they can use ordinary screws, no, go to any normal DIY and look/ ask for plaster board fixings, they come in plastic and also a sort of soft metal, they have a very coarse thread which you first screw into the plaster board, then you screw 'normally' into the fixing. Some come with their own screw, others you use a conventional screw. Most of these special fixings tell you you don't need to create a pilot hole, just center them and screw in. Personally I always use a small pilot hole, it helps to centre the fixing more accurately, also until you get used to installing the special fixing there can be a tendency for the paper surface of the plaster board to rise up slightly. I've used these fixings loads of time. Hint, always make sure that the weight of whatever you are hanging has sufficient fixings. Hope this helps.
  • jamesmcuk
    @OP: Do you think that this would be a suitable material to sew inbetween some material. Perhaps even make pockets that this could be slid into so it can be removed for washing etc?

    TRISO SUPER 10 FOIL INSULATION

    Won't let me post link but search google / Youtube for above
  • potbelly
    Fixing to PVC windows
    Sounds good but I am not sure how I can fix them. I have an angled bay window so would have to make 3 quilts. There is no space above the pvc double glazed window to put a batten and I dont want to drill into the UPVC itself. Can anyone help?
    The "ceiling" over the bay window is just plaster board. I have thought about a sort of roller blind set up but am not sure if the quilt would prove too thick for this to work.
    Originally posted by grump
    How about using self adhesive velcro. Stick one side to the PVC and sew the other to the 'quilt'. That would allow you to remove the quilts easily and if you want to permanently remove them, the adhesive velcro will peel off and any remaining adhesive cleaned up with meths or white spirit.
    Hope that helps.
    Bye for now,
    Paul

    What colour is YOUR parachute?
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