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Do you need a chimney for a wood burning stove?
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# 1
jojo2910
Old 23-02-2012, 8:58 AM
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Default Do you need a chimney for a wood burning stove?

Hi,

We are house hunting and would love a wood burning stove. The houses we like are more modern and do not have chimneys. Is it possible to have a wood burning stove without a chimney? And if so how?

Thanks,

Jo
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# 2
mildred1978
Old 23-02-2012, 9:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jojo2910 View Post
Hi,

We are house hunting and would love a wood burning stove. The houses we like are more modern and do not have chimneys. Is it possible to have a wood burning stove without a chimney? And if so how?

Thanks,

Jo
You have to have some sort of chimney to take the smoke to the top of the roof level. With no built in chimney that means one of these. It makes your house look like a Chinese takeaway.




Some areas of the uk have restrictions on smoke (smoke free zones) so probably worth checking you aren't in one of those!
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# 3
ed110220
Old 23-02-2012, 9:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mildred1978 View Post
You have to have some sort of chimney to take the smoke to the top of the roof level. With no built in chimney that means one of these. It makes your house look like a Chinese takeaway.




Some areas of the uk have restrictions on smoke (smoke free zones) so probably worth checking you aren't in one of those!

I think the house pictured above only has such a tall flue in order to take it above the level of the upper storey - if it was on the highest roof it could be normal height.

You don't need a traditional masonry chimney in order to have a wood burner, you can just have a steel flue like that. My house has no masonry at all but it does have a cast iron flue, boxed in with dry wall work, originally for a coal stove that ran an early central heating system.
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# 4
jojo2910
Old 23-02-2012, 10:24 AM
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Thanks both. Do you know how much it would cost to install a flue and who do you approach to put one in? We've seen a stove we like at a company that only sells them, doesn't install them and would like to know who to approach to install.
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# 5
ormus
Old 23-02-2012, 10:30 AM
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http://www.woodstovefitters.co.uk/co...4549352735.jpg

on an outside wall, it would probably look like this one.
internally the flue be boxed in and exit near the roof apex. so a small pipe/cowl only required.
Get some gorm.
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# 6
ormus
Old 23-02-2012, 10:32 AM
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another example.
Get some gorm.
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# 7
bobthedambuilder
Old 23-02-2012, 10:54 AM
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I have a flue that goes up inside the house, through a bedroom (in a stainless steel twin-walled sleeve), and out through the roof. I also get the benefit of heat in the bedroom as the flue gets warm (but not too hot to touch). It was installed while I was renovating the house.
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# 8
Canucklehead
Old 23-02-2012, 12:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jojo2910 View Post
Thanks both. Do you know how much it would cost to install a flue and who do you approach to put one in? We've seen a stove we like at a company that only sells them, doesn't install them and would like to know who to approach to install.
Hi: find yourself a HETAS installer here...he/she will be able to advise after conducting a site survey. This is a useful site.

Canucklehead
Ask to see CIPHE (Chartered Institute of Plumbing & Heating Engineering)
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# 9
jojo2910
Old 23-02-2012, 1:03 PM
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Much appreciated all, now we know it can be done
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# 10
muckybutt
Old 23-02-2012, 9:21 PM
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You can buy many stoves that can be used in smoke free zones on make being Clearview....expensive but the mutts nuts as far as stoves go.

If you want any more advice pm me and i'll answer any questions you have ( i'm a chimney sweep ) theres a lot of things you have to do when you get a stove and its not always plain sailing !

Alternatively post a new thread on the solid fuel forum and ask away.
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# 11
prosaver
Old 04-03-2012, 9:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobthedambuilder View Post
I have a flue that goes up inside the house, through a bedroom (in a stainless steel twin-walled sleeve), and out through the roof. I also get the benefit of heat in the bedroom as the flue gets warm (but not too hot to touch). It was installed while I was renovating the house.
how much did it all cost to set up?
beans
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# 12
bobthedambuilder
Old 05-03-2012, 9:49 AM
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Originally Posted by prosaver View Post
how much did it all cost to set up?
I have to say that the twin-walled SS flue was horribly expensive - over 100 per metre material only. There's probably about 6 metres of flue, so by the time you allow for fitting etc, it would have been well over 1000 for the flue. (It was part of a lump sum for a total house renovation, so I can't be more precise than that).

This is what it looked like during installation. The flue pipe comes up through the bedroom floor from the stove underneath, and out through the roof. As I said, we get the benefit in the bedroom whenever the stove is on, as the pipe warms up (but not too hot to touch).
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# 13
sunshinetours
Old 05-03-2012, 11:00 AM
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As above the twin wall SS flue pipe is the expensive bit. Its something we need to have done if we waht a "real fire" but the downsides are initial cost and looks (they aren't attractive in any shape or form) and real fires are not cheaper to run unless you have a good supply of firewood.
Think we will end up with a gas stove that works via a balanced flue. Cheaper, less messy, and possibly no more cost to run than a real fire
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# 14
maninthestreet
Old 05-03-2012, 1:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ormus View Post


another example.
It's an eyesore!
"You were only supposed to blow the bl**dy doors off!!"
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# 15
muckybutt
Old 05-03-2012, 2:38 PM
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Originally Posted by maninthestreet View Post
It's an eyesore!
Really constructive comment
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# 16
sunshinetours
Old 06-03-2012, 9:27 AM
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Maybe - but its true - that is an ugly installation and that can be the problem with external flues on some houses
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# 17
prosaver
Old 06-03-2012, 12:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobthedambuilder View Post
I have to say that the twin-walled SS flue was horribly expensive - over 100 per metre material only. There's probably about 6 metres of flue, so by the time you allow for fitting etc, it would have been well over 1000 for the flue. (It was part of a lump sum for a total house renovation, so I can't be more precise than that).

This is what it looked like during installation. The flue pipe comes up through the bedroom floor from the stove underneath, and out through the roof. As I said, we get the benefit in the bedroom whenever the stove is on, as the pipe warms up (but not too hot to touch).
thanks mate,
the things is, we are thinking of getting a new boiler,
The choice
a, back boiler with fire and heats the central heating up(open up old fire place)
b, wood burning stove,conected to cental heating
c combi boiler so ive got a quote for a combi fitted 1400
d nothing-wait till it packs in ( the boiler is from the 70s but still going strong)
.
need to do some research....
anyone got any ideas?
beans
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