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How to wire in a new electric cooker..?
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# 1
Samphire
Old 12-12-2006, 2:54 PM
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Default How to wire in a new electric cooker..?

Help! I'm a newbie here and a novice DIY-er (as is my husband). My oven is dying by inches, and as I can't face more burnt biscuits and undercooked stews at Christmas time I've pushed the boat out and bought a new one. I found the model I wanted online from the Co-Op electricals much cheaper than at Comet and have ordered it (it's arriving on Tuesday), but they don't offer a fitting service. It's a built in double oven model, replacing a built in single oven which is also electric. I didn't think we could legally wire this in ourselves, but a friend has told me that if there's an existing cooker circuit its OK. Anyone know if this is true, and what's involved in wiring in a cooker?
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# 2
weekendwarrior
Old 12-12-2006, 3:26 PM
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I am a bit confused here, have you purchased an oven or a cooker?

If you have purchased a double oven to replace a single oven then you may be in for a shock as the double oven may require a dedicated circuit.

A single electric oven can normally be wired to a plug and plugged into a socket, if you have a dedicated circuit there already then this will need checking to ensure it can carry the load of the new oven.

If you have an electric hob, then this circuit is normally used to feed both the hob and the oven, in which case you should be ok, but still get the thickness of wire checked.

You can get some information from here-

Electric cooker circuits


Replcaing an electric oven

Hope this helps a little
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# 3
bigdic
Old 13-12-2006, 10:09 AM
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WW is quite correct, we replaced a single oven with a double oven and the spark had to install a new circuit to take the load.

If this is the case you'll need a certificate from an eletrician to confirm the work has been checked and is safe.
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# 4
Samphire
Old 13-12-2006, 9:39 PM
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Sorry for the confusion, I used the words "cooker" and "oven" interchangably - there's no hob, it's a double oven that fits into a kitchen unit (or in our case the old chimney breast). Looks like we need to get hold of a sparks pretty quick if I'm to use it for Christmas dinner!!
Those links were great though, really clear instructions, thanks weekendwarrior!
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# 5
Cypher
Old 13-12-2006, 11:28 PM
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If the oven is under 3KW it can be wired on a standard 13Amp plug top.
I'd check if your existing oven is like this, I'm pretty much certain a double oven will be over 3KW and so it will need to be hard wired into a cooker circuit.

Is your hob also electric ?
Do you have an exisiting cooker circuit ?
Do you know what current your cooker circuits, fuse or circuit breaker is rated for ?
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# 6
deanos
Old 14-12-2006, 9:35 AM
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We changed a single oven thet ran off a a normal plug to a double oven and had to get the socket changed lucklily the neighbour is a sparky and it only cost 10 for parts but definately dont use a normal plug and just plug it into a socket or the cable will melt
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# 7
Samphire
Old 16-12-2006, 2:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cypher
Is your hob also electric ?
Do you have an exisiting cooker circuit ?
Do you know what current your cooker circuits, fuse or circuit breaker is rated for ?
Thanks everyone for your comments and help.\

The hob is gas, and is on the other side of the kitchen so it shouldn't affect this at all.
There is an existing electric cooker which was installed by Comet, so I'm assuming that there is an existing cooker circuit but I don't know anything about electrics!
I don't know what current current anything is rated for, the existing oven was the absolute cheapest we could find as we'd just moved house and had absolutely no money when the last one packed up. It replaced a gas oven which had been built into the same position.
Our usual (trusted) electrician is booked up until the New Year and I'd like to get it in next week if at all possible. I'm hoping that we can take a chance on a Sparks out of the phone book on the basis that it's not a huge job and I know my house wiring is sound so I'm not going to fall prey to someone trying to create work! Does anyone who has had this done at "market rates" remember roughly how much it cost? If necessary I'm prepared to cough up a bit extra to have it done quickly as I'd really like to be able to do some baking with my son for Christmas, but it's useful to have a rough idea what the usual cost is!
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# 8
nomoneytoday
Old 16-12-2006, 2:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samphire
but I don't know anything about electrics!
I don't know what current current anything is rated for,

Please get an expert to fit it, regardless of the cost (should be around 50ish)
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# 9
Samphire
Old 16-12-2006, 4:00 PM
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Thanks Nomoneytoday. Don't worry, I'm definately getting an expert to fit it, the only question is whether I wait until our usual electrician has the time to do it or use another sparks from the phonebook. I've asked other locals for recomendations and haven't had any! Having been comprehensively stitched up by a heating engineer pulled at random from the phone book when we bought our first house I always like to have a feel for what a job should cost before talking to tradesmen who haven't been recomended.
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# 10
Cypher
Old 16-12-2006, 4:59 PM
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If you have a cooker circuit you should be able to see the big red isolation switch on the wall. If not then the chances are its connected via a 13A plugtop plugged into a standard socket.

You could also look in your consumer unit (fusebox) to see if there is a dedicated circuit for the cooker.
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# 11
flang
Old 16-12-2006, 10:07 PM
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I always say if you dont already know how to do it dont do it!
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# 12
driverlady
Old 17-12-2008, 11:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nomoneytoday View Post
Please get an expert to fit it, regardless of the cost (should be around 50ish)
HI I m knew to this but i need to know how to wire in a single oven and hob electric my daughter bought one from currys and it is getting near xmas and there is no instructions how to fit it
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# 13
driverlady
Old 17-12-2008, 11:56 PM
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Question how do you wire in electric oven andhob single

please help me someone out there how do you connect a single electric hob and oven to the mains is it plug or what there are no wires or plugs with it
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# 14
weekendwarrior
Old 18-12-2008, 4:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by driverlady View Post
please help me someone out there how do you connect a single electric hob and oven to the mains is it plug or what there are no wires or plugs with it
The answer is in my post above.

You can plug the single electric oven into a socket as long as it is less than 3kw ( most single ovens are)

The hob will require it's own dedicated circuit.
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# 15
mikey72
Old 18-12-2008, 9:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by driverlady View Post
please help me someone out there how do you connect a single electric hob and oven to the mains is it plug or what there are no wires or plugs with it
It depends on the wiring to your kitchen, and the consumer unit type, as to whether or not it should be plugged into a 13A socket, but if there is no cable on it, it needs a dedicated supply.
Even if you have an existing cooker point, modern cookers can be over twice the power of old ones, so the wiring may still need updating.
It also needs the right specification of cable.
Instructions aren't given with cookers as it's not a diy job, unless you already know what you are doing.
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# 16
brownbake
Old 18-12-2008, 3:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samphire View Post
Thanks Nomoneytoday. Don't worry, I'm definately getting an expert to fit it, the only question is whether I wait until our usual electrician has the time to do it or use another sparks from the phonebook. I've asked other locals for recomendations and haven't had any! Having been comprehensively stitched up by a heating engineer pulled at random from the phone book when we bought our first house I always like to have a feel for what a job should cost before talking to tradesmen who haven't been recomended.
Yes there are a LOT of cowboys out there!!! I am not sure why Rogue Traders isn't on nightly!!
My sister paid 50 for disconnection of a gas cooker and recconection of the new one by a qualified person. She said it was 15 mins work in total - nice work if you can get it.
A sparky will probably cost the same dependent on area and if all connections were there before and no work needs doing.
We need our new cooker wired in - when we get it but the spark did wire the cooker ring socket in so we know it will fit.

Please get some advice from a spark on this or another DIY website. As my partner learnt to his, and the sockets cost!! the cooker is on a different circuit to the sockets lol!! HTH
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# 17
Alias_Omega
Old 27-12-2008, 8:42 PM
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Were about to undertake an oven and hob change, the idea was to go with a gas hob, but now it looks like an electric hob.

As the hob will be fed direct from the cooker switch via a 6mm cable, and on a 32amp MCB, we were simply thinking of either -

a) Putting the cooker switch in the 300 cupboard next to the cooker with a socket on it for the oven, which puts it onto its own circuit

or

b) As per old times, split the cooker supply with a 30amp JB and put a 6mm cable into the back of the oven, and the other into the hob.

Any ideas?
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# 18
davidkj
Old 29-12-2008, 1:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alias_Omega View Post
Were about to undertake an oven and hob change, the idea was to go with a gas hob, but now it looks like an electric hob.

As the hob will be fed direct from the cooker switch via a 6mm cable, and on a 32amp MCB, we were simply thinking of either -

a) Putting the cooker switch in the 300 cupboard next to the cooker with a socket on it for the oven, which puts it onto its own circuit

or

b) As per old times, split the cooker supply with a 30amp JB and put a 6mm cable into the back of the oven, and the other into the hob.

Any ideas?
How much power does the hob draw. it should be in the specs eg 3 kW(3000W)
the Sum : Current (Amps) = Power (Watts) / Voltage
Current (Amps) = 3000 / 230v
Current (Amps) = 13.04Amps
At this rating you could just get away with using a 13Amp plug and socket.
Note: The 0.04 of an Amp over would be took up in Diversity as stated in BS7671 ( 17th Edition Electrical regulations. )
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# 19
Alias_Omega
Old 29-12-2008, 10:14 PM
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hi david, we decided to go with the 2x 6mm cables from the cooker outlet, 1 to the hob and 1 to the oven to prevent any problems with isolations.

In the end it was easier to leave it as that, than to start putting sockets in down below.
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# 20
lj224
Old 28-10-2009, 5:11 PM
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I don't suppose anyone would know about the regulations for electric cookers with hobbs with regards to plugs being above them? Is there a height they have to be away from the hobbs? Thank you!
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