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  • FIRST POST
    • Giddytimes
    • By Giddytimes 27th May 11, 8:31 PM
    • 430Posts
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    Giddytimes
    Can I donate fake goods to a charity shop?
    • #1
    • 27th May 11, 8:31 PM
    Can I donate fake goods to a charity shop? 27th May 11 at 8:31 PM
    I bought 2 dresses a while back from an internet site, when they arrived I could tell they were fake. They also didn't fit me.

    The website disappeared and I tried but failed to receive a refund.

    These dresses have been sitting in my wardrobe for over a year now, they are nice dresses, well made, it seems a shame for them to just be sat in my wardrobe.

    I tried to sell them on ebay about 6 months ago, stating in the listing that I don't believe them to be real but my listing was removed. I understand I breached Ebay rules, hadn't realised at the time.

    So, can I donate these dresses to charity? Would I get in trouble for this? I was thinking of taking them in and specifically telling the shop assistant that they aren't real.

    I just have a nagging doubt as can imagine that either way they will end up back on ebay somehow, but being advertised as real. Does anyone know if there is any come back on me if they do?

    Thanks
    Debt at 1/5/09 21,996
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Page 1
    • pinkshoes
    • By pinkshoes 27th May 11, 8:39 PM
    • 14,329 Posts
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    pinkshoes
    • #2
    • 27th May 11, 8:39 PM
    • #2
    • 27th May 11, 8:39 PM
    Just destroy them. They were no doubt made by slave labour, and some fat cat is profiting, so the best place for them is the bin.

    Actually, I would rip them, then put them in a material recycling bin.
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 27th May 11, 8:42 PM
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    PasturesNew
    • #3
    • 27th May 11, 8:42 PM
    • #3
    • 27th May 11, 8:42 PM
    Can't you just cut the labels out? So they're unlabelled random dresses?
    • hermum
    • By hermum 27th May 11, 8:47 PM
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    hermum
    • #4
    • 27th May 11, 8:47 PM
    • #4
    • 27th May 11, 8:47 PM
    Can't you just cut the labels out? So they're unlabelled random dresses?
    Originally posted by PasturesNew
    I was going to say the same, can't you sell them as just dresses.
    • butler_helen
    • By butler_helen 27th May 11, 9:16 PM
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    butler_helen
    • #5
    • 27th May 11, 9:16 PM
    • #5
    • 27th May 11, 9:16 PM
    I too would take them to the shop, with the labels cut off so you cannot tell what brand they were meant to be.
    If you aim for the moon if you miss at least you will land among the stars!
    • RFW
    • By RFW 27th May 11, 10:21 PM
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    RFW
    • #6
    • 27th May 11, 10:21 PM
    • #6
    • 27th May 11, 10:21 PM
    Just destroy them. They were no doubt made by slave labour, and some fat cat is profiting, so the best place for them is the bin.
    Originally posted by pinkshoes
    They are already made, no one is advocating buying more to send to a charity shop. A lot of fakes are made in this country and when discovered usually end up in landfill, there has been programmes to have them delabelled and sent to third world countries.
    .
  • shop-to-drop
    • #7
    • 27th May 11, 10:23 PM
    • #7
    • 27th May 11, 10:23 PM
    I'd take them but maybe put a cross through the label. Better the charity shop gets something than they go in the bin.
    Trytryagain FLYLADY - SAYE 700 each month Premium Bonds 713 Mortgage Was 100,000@20/6/08 now zilch 21/4/15 WTL - 52 (I'll do it 4 MUM)
  • iieee
    • #8
    • 27th May 11, 10:39 PM
    • #8
    • 27th May 11, 10:39 PM
    I was going to suggest cutting the labels too.
    :: MFi3 ::
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    • Ben84
    • By Ben84 27th May 11, 10:56 PM
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    Ben84
    • #9
    • 27th May 11, 10:56 PM
    • #9
    • 27th May 11, 10:56 PM
    Just destroy them. They were no doubt made by slave labour, and some fat cat is profiting, so the best place for them is the bin.

    Actually, I would rip them, then put them in a material recycling bin.
    Originally posted by pinkshoes
    I'd be surprised if they were made with slave labour, although poorly paid labour is a likely possibility. However, I would also accuse manufacturers of many 'genuine' clothes of using very poorly paid labour and making huge amounts of profit for a few individuals, so if this is a reason to throw out clothes a significant amount of items in wardrobes across the UK should be thrown out! It's a non-point though, we have no certainty that their production had negative effects on someone and throwing them out does nothing to negate any possible negative effects they had ether. If the quality of the item is good then it would be reasonable to find someone who would like to wear them and the OP could attempt to recover some of the money spent on them.

    The label could be removed and then they could be sold on eBay. While selling fakes is not allowed, without the label making the false claim they are just dresses. Describe them as fairly as possible on condition/quality and state they have no brand in the listing and I'm sure you'd be fine. Worst they could do is remove your listing, but really why would they remove a listing for an unbranded dress that is described as such.
  • missbishi
    I'm all for cutting the labels out and relisting too - use the right keywords in your title and it won't matter that they are unbranded as pretty dresses always sell very well over the summer months : )
    • Giddytimes
    • By Giddytimes 28th May 11, 1:18 AM
    • 430 Posts
    • 457 Thanks
    Giddytimes
    Thanks guys.

    I'm not sure I will be able to remove all the brand markings from these dresses but I'll dig them out this weekend and have a go. If I put a hole in them trying I guess I won't have lost anything anyway!
    Debt at 1/5/09 21,996
    Current debt- 0 Final payment made October 2012.
    • Giddytimes
    • By Giddytimes 28th May 11, 1:21 AM
    • 430 Posts
    • 457 Thanks
    Giddytimes
    Out of interest though does anyone know the answer to my question? Could someone end up in trouble for donating fake goods to charity?
    Debt at 1/5/09 21,996
    Current debt- 0 Final payment made October 2012.
    • jasmineswhiskers
    • By jasmineswhiskers 28th May 11, 11:23 AM
    • 2,056 Posts
    • 1,422 Thanks
    jasmineswhiskers
    Out of interest though does anyone know the answer to my question? Could someone end up in trouble for donating fake goods to charity?
    Originally posted by Giddytimes
    I expect they're not allowed but who really knows who donated what? I popped in an Oxfam the other week and they had for sale a fake Mulberry bag (the quality was worse than something off the market) for 25. Surely at this price they knew it wasn't real as the real deal sells for 775 new.
  • hermione987uk
    I've brought fake designer stuff from charity shops before (it was a hand bag and I was only 15 so couldn't really tell the difference, mind you the price of 2.50 should have given it was.)

    There was also a section on one of those airline shows about a charity that collects all seized fake designer clothes and puts their own label on it and send them to Africa and other countries.
  • Rotherham Lass
    I took some fake UGG boots in to a charity shop and told the manager they weren't real but were they of any use to her. She practically snatched my hand off. They were horrible too and one glance would show they were fake. Sure someone would have bought them though.
    • wombles forever
    • By wombles forever 30th May 11, 11:32 AM
    • 175 Posts
    • 179 Thanks
    wombles forever
    Hi Having worked in several charity shops I can say that all charity shops are bound by the same rules on fake goods as everyone else. They are not allowed to knowingly sell any fake designer goods and as such if there is any doubt they will destroy the items rather than face the prospect of being liable for selling them. You would not get into trouble for donating them as such but they could not then resell knowing that they were fakes. Hope this helps.
  • discofunction
    I wouldnt feel right reselling them knowing they are fake. But if they are decent to wear and you take the labels out and give them to charity then surely its just any old dress that someone might enjoy. Surely better than going to landfill!
  • macfly
    Why aren't you wearing them?
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