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  • FIRST POST
    • John_the_Boy
    • By John_the_Boy 22nd Jan 11, 8:53 PM
    • 185Posts
    • 90Thanks
    John_the_Boy
    Best Type of Fire Surround for a Multifuel Stove
    • #1
    • 22nd Jan 11, 8:53 PM
    Best Type of Fire Surround for a Multifuel Stove 22nd Jan 11 at 8:53 PM
    Hi all,

    Planning to open up my fireplace (in a reasonably modern house) to create a small inglenook for a multifuel stove. Getting very confused with internet advice re what is the best type of surround for a stove and the best material to line the inglenook with. So I though I would ask for ideas from those of you with stoves already installed.

    A brick surround wouldn't suit the room so I guess that leaves marble, stone (such as limestone) and wood. Are there any drawbacks with these, such as smoke staining the limestone and greater clearance needed for a wood surround?

    Re lining the inglenook, I know I can use fireboard but am not sure what other materials are best to use (my wife doesn't like the look of fireboard on its own ) so am looking for ideas please.

    Appreciate the help.
Page 1
  • DVardysShadow
    • #2
    • 22nd Jan 11, 9:42 PM
    • #2
    • 22nd Jan 11, 9:42 PM
    Brick painted matt black could do the job.
    • muckybutt
    • By muckybutt 22nd Jan 11, 10:42 PM
    • 3,622 Posts
    • 3,419 Thanks
    muckybutt
    • #3
    • 22nd Jan 11, 10:42 PM
    • #3
    • 22nd Jan 11, 10:42 PM
    Slate looks great and it'll hold the heat after the stove has gone out.
    Wood isnt a good idea as its flammable for starters, limestone.....I hate sweeping chimneys with limestone surrounds - hearths they are a right PITA to keep clean and will inevitably suck up some smoke into it.

    You could also paint the bricks as said, line it with vermiculite panel board or fire board and paint that or you could tile it, I have seen some lovely tiled inglenooks.
    You may click thanks if you found my advice useful
    • leveller2911
    • By leveller2911 22nd Jan 11, 10:50 PM
    • 7,020 Posts
    • 12,276 Thanks
    leveller2911
    • #4
    • 22nd Jan 11, 10:50 PM
    • #4
    • 22nd Jan 11, 10:50 PM
    I like a woodburner sitting in a fireplace ,on a slate hearth with all the internal wall rendered ,painted and with a mantle shelf over the fireplace...Oh and a nice wicker basket/trug for the logs sitting to the left of the fireplace..
    If we in parliament cannot gain from ruling,then there is very little point in us being here: (Lord Manchester 1650) :rolleyes: how true!
    • John_the_Boy
    • By John_the_Boy 23rd Jan 11, 8:28 AM
    • 185 Posts
    • 90 Thanks
    John_the_Boy
    • #5
    • 23rd Jan 11, 8:28 AM
    • #5
    • 23rd Jan 11, 8:28 AM
    Thanks for the ideas - currently thinking about a white marble surround, black granite hearth and slips plus tiles to match the white marble inside the inglenook.


    Do you need any special type of tiles or tile cement to withstand the heat?
  • DVardysShadow
    • #6
    • 23rd Jan 11, 8:47 AM
    • #6
    • 23rd Jan 11, 8:47 AM
    White marble and a multifuel stove is a bit of a mixed metaphor? Personally, I would avoid white in the inglenook, it creates a cleaning liability in an awkward place. Ordinary cement is good to 50degC, but it denatures above that. I think if the inglenook is not too confined, you will be OK.
    • John_the_Boy
    • By John_the_Boy 23rd Jan 11, 9:17 AM
    • 185 Posts
    • 90 Thanks
    John_the_Boy
    • #7
    • 23rd Jan 11, 9:17 AM
    • #7
    • 23rd Jan 11, 9:17 AM
    I know what you mean unfortunately a marble surround fits in better with the room which has coving and dados and my wife doesn't want to change these features. I personally prefer more rustic but have to keep my better half happy

    This was the sort of look my wife was after.....we liked the white inglenook lining idea as it made the stove stand out but I see you point about cleaning!



    • WillowCat
    • By WillowCat 23rd Jan 11, 10:18 AM
    • 592 Posts
    • 657 Thanks
    WillowCat
    • #8
    • 23rd Jan 11, 10:18 AM
    • #8
    • 23rd Jan 11, 10:18 AM
    The stoves in those two pictures are more for show than heating.....

    They are recessed so far back in the chimney that the convection currents will be weak without using something like an eco-fan.

    If you have the hearth extended further in front, then use the rear flue exit on the stove it can sit half in/half out of the chimney breast giving a much more even heat.

    I also prefer the more rustic look as it seems to fit better with the practicalities of a stove - there's usually bits of kindling, sawdust from the old pallets we've sawn up, odd shaped lots and all sorts extra strewn around........nothing like the sanitised pics! We've only had our stove working a week so far though, so perhaps we'll get more organised in time.
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