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  • FIRST POST
    wizzkid
    French door repair- re-puttying windows
    • #1
    • 15th Aug 06, 11:14 PM
    French door repair- re-puttying windows 15th Aug 06 at 11:14 PM
    I have some french doors. the little window panes let in water when it rains. So, I want to re putty them and fix it. The front of the door has fixed glazing bars in, the glass is pretty much loose, and the internal glazing bars are held in with a couple of pins.

    How do I get the pins out so that I can remove the internal glazing bars and then the glass, clean up and re putty with out breaking the glazing bars or the glass?

    I had a look in wickes tonight to see if they did some kind of pack of glazing bars, but they don't, in case I had to break them to remove them. I don't fancy the thought of having to cut the glazing bars from a length of wood as I always get the measurements and the angles wrong!
Page 1
    • Lord_Gardener
    • By Lord_Gardener 16th Aug 06, 8:03 AM
    • 2,935 Posts
    • 913 Thanks
    Lord_Gardener
    • #2
    • 16th Aug 06, 8:03 AM
    • #2
    • 16th Aug 06, 8:03 AM
    Break any paint seal with a stanley knife then carefully prise up with a broad bladed knife to allow sufficient of the pin head to be exposed. Use a pair of thin nosed pliers to gently pull out - in my experience most times the pins aren't very long and usually come out with the wood. Just take your time!
    • Rex_Mundi
    • By Rex_Mundi 16th Aug 06, 9:33 AM
    • 5,149 Posts
    • 3,838 Thanks
    Rex_Mundi
    • #3
    • 16th Aug 06, 9:33 AM
    • #3
    • 16th Aug 06, 9:33 AM
    Start on the longest beads first (normally going up). If you do the small beads first, there is more chance of them snapping. If you are taking a lot out, lay the beads out so you know which beads came from which pane (I lay mine out left/right/top/bottom so they go back in the same place). Sometimes there are tiny differences in the size, they will go back in their original pane easier than mixing them up.

    Just take your time with this job. It can be awkward, and fiddly, and frustrating. Don't be surprised if you snap one or two beads (it's easy to do). Sometimes the snapped beads can be put back so that you won't notice the join.

    If you need to buy more beading, it's called glass bead. It comes in lengths, and you need to mitre the corners to size.

    Don't use linseed oil putty to re-bed the glass. Use butyl putty. This is better suited to the job.
  • handyman.
    • #4
    • 16th Aug 06, 4:36 PM
    • #4
    • 16th Aug 06, 4:36 PM
    any thoughts on acrylic putty? I use it all the time with window refurb and paint, very good indead
  • wizzkid
    • #5
    • 16th Aug 06, 5:39 PM
    • #5
    • 16th Aug 06, 5:39 PM
    Thank you for this information. I think I will have to do one pane at a time as time is in short supply at the mo.

    What is the difference between the linseed and the butly (and acrylic) putty? I got linseed as it was the only one in the (local independant) shop. Was v cheap, so it is not a tradgedy if I don't use it.

    I had not thought of using a blade to ease the bar out with. I had been trying to get a claw hammer to work!
    • Rex_Mundi
    • By Rex_Mundi 16th Aug 06, 6:05 PM
    • 5,149 Posts
    • 3,838 Thanks
    Rex_Mundi
    • #6
    • 16th Aug 06, 6:05 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Aug 06, 6:05 PM
    What is the difference between the linseed and the butly (and acrylic) putty? I got linseed as it was the only one in the (local independant) shop. Was v cheap, so it is not a tradgedy if I don't use it.
    by wizzkid
    Butyl is better for beaded windows because it's meant to stay soft underneath the beading (although I've seen it rock hard in the past). Using linseed oil putty wont make a difference to the work you need to do, you may only notice a difference if you need to replace one of the panes in the future (it'll be harder to clean out).

    any thoughts on acrylic putty? I use it all the time with window refurb and paint, very good indead
    by handyman
    In approx 25 years in the glass trade, I've never used this or come accross any glaziers that use it (still putty bashing when needed).
  • handyman.
    • #7
    • 16th Aug 06, 6:42 PM
    • #7
    • 16th Aug 06, 6:42 PM
    you should try it then ???

    although its probably best for refurb where you want to fill small areas of putty, or fill cracks in putty, or the edge that comes away from the glass on existing putty that draws water into the frame..........all depends if its solid or not. Main thing is it skins within 2-3 hrs, so it can de painted sooner.
    Last edited by handyman.; 16-08-2006 at 6:50 PM.
  • wizzkid
    • #8
    • 16th Aug 06, 9:20 PM
    • #8
    • 16th Aug 06, 9:20 PM
    Did the first of 16 panes this evening, and with the advice from here, it was SO EASY!!

    THANK YOU!!
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