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  • FIRST POST
    Minky2Slice
    removing/replacing skirting boards?
    • #1
    • 18th Jul 09, 12:01 AM
    removing/replacing skirting boards? 18th Jul 09 at 12:01 AM
    Hi, i am hoping someone can give me some advice as in new to DIY

    I am planning on painting my bedroom tomorrow.
    The current skirting boards are brown wood and quite ugly and i want them to be white. dont plan on replacing the carpets in the next year or so, so i was thinking or replacing the skirting boards with white ones.

    How easy is it to take the old ones off and put new ones on?
    I'm hoping no plaster comes off when i pull them off. and how do you secure the new ones on the walls? the current ones must've been glued on because I cant see any screws?

    does anybody know if this is an easy task or if it's best to get someone to do them for me?
    ** i didn't lose my mind, i sold it on ebay **
Page 1
    • loracan1
    • By loracan1 18th Jul 09, 12:08 AM
    • 2,233 Posts
    • 2,443 Thanks
    loracan1
    • #2
    • 18th Jul 09, 12:08 AM
    • #2
    • 18th Jul 09, 12:08 AM
    You could just paint them? Sand down, undercoat/prime first...sand down when dried and paint over.
    • Biggles
    • By Biggles 18th Jul 09, 12:20 AM
    • 7,369 Posts
    • 4,762 Thanks
    Biggles
    • #3
    • 18th Jul 09, 12:20 AM
    • #3
    • 18th Jul 09, 12:20 AM
    I am planning on painting my bedroom tomorrow.
    The current skirting boards are brown wood and quite ugly and i want them to be white. dont plan on replacing the carpets in the next year or so, so i was thinking or replacing the skirting boards with white ones.
    Originally posted by Minky2Slice
    Wood only comes in one colour: wood. Most are painted, white does tend to be the commonest colour; maybe yours were even painted white before someone chose to go over them in brown. A quick sanding, an undercoat and Bob's your uncle.
    • diable
    • By diable 18th Jul 09, 12:32 AM
    • 5,116 Posts
    • 3,968 Thanks
    diable
    • #4
    • 18th Jul 09, 12:32 AM
    • #4
    • 18th Jul 09, 12:32 AM
    Getting old skirting boards off is a sod of a job, as advised sand down and paint the ones you already have.
    • olias
    • By olias 18th Jul 09, 12:46 AM
    • 3,503 Posts
    • 3,974 Thanks
    olias
    • #5
    • 18th Jul 09, 12:46 AM
    • #5
    • 18th Jul 09, 12:46 AM
    Ifd you are adamant about replacing them then I would advise:

    They may be screwed or nailed (nails/screws may have been countersunk and filled).

    Make sure you score along the top where they join the wall before prising off, otherwise you will pull of plaster.

    Replace with slightly wider skirting, this will have the benefit of covering over the ragged line wher the previous skirting reached.

    Use decorators caulk to fill in any gaps at the top of the skirting due to uneven walls etc

    Invest in a coping saw for internal corners (google for how to do them), and a decent tenon or mitre saw for the external corners.

    Watch out for your carpets when you repaint (I find it better to paint before applying the skirting, then you will just need a bit of touching up once they are applied.

    Olias
  • ailuro2
    • #6
    • 18th Jul 09, 12:54 AM
    • #6
    • 18th Jul 09, 12:54 AM
    Not a job for the beginner, and definitely not if your walls are anywhere less than straight.

    Good sanding down, primer then decent 'silk' finish gloss paint.(Silk is more forgiving on poor surfaces.
    Member of the first Mortgage Free in 3 challenge, no.19
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    • 27col
    • By 27col 18th Jul 09, 11:25 AM
    • 6,450 Posts
    • 4,215 Thanks
    27col
    • #7
    • 18th Jul 09, 11:25 AM
    • #7
    • 18th Jul 09, 11:25 AM
    I cannot help thinking that DIY would be a lot more difficult than it is if we all replaced wood items that were a colour that we did not like. I would love to know the logic of your reasoning for that one.
    Skirting boards can sometimes be a right s*d to remove, and the chances of doing it without damage to both the board and adjacent plaster are fairly remote. It is not a particularly difficult job to do. But, I would have thought, completely unnecessary, unless badly damaged in some way. Most likely a good sanding down will suffice. If not, then the application of a heat gun will remove the offending paint. One of the main secrets of DIY is to keep it simple.
    I can afford anything that I want.
    Just so long as I don't want much.
  • sillywilly
    • #8
    • 18th Jul 09, 4:15 PM
    • #8
    • 18th Jul 09, 4:15 PM
    It isn't that hard to take them off - just requires either a wrecking bar or a hammer and chisel to get behind them. The plaster around them will deifinitely get damaged but this can be filled and if you get slightly taller skirting then it will also hide the damage.

    You can get MDF ready primed skirting which is a hell of a lot easier to work with and a lot less hassle than priming wood.

    Also hardly any walls are true so there will be some filling / caulking at the end. Fitting them is easy with some Gripfill and masonary nails.

    However cutting them and mitreing them is not so easy.

    HTH
  • Minky2Slice
    • #9
    • 19th Jul 09, 2:54 PM
    • #9
    • 19th Jul 09, 2:54 PM
    thanks for the sugggestions, i would like to replace them, as most of it looks like it has come away from the walls already and the wood isnt in such a good condition anymore, plus some of it has been damaged (by previous owners i think)
    have painted the room yesterday, so will wait till we get the carpets replaced and then replace the skirting at the same time :-)
  • ormus
    as been said, its not a hard job to replace skirting. can be a bit fiddly to get it filled correctly with some walls/rooms, ready for painting.
    the good news is that skirting is fairly cheap stuff.
    Get some gorm.
    • dld2s
    • By dld2s 19th Jul 09, 4:41 PM
    • 372 Posts
    • 200 Thanks
    dld2s
    thanks for the sugggestions, i would like to replace them, as most of it looks like it has come away from the walls already and the wood isnt in such a good condition anymore, plus some of it has been damaged (by previous owners i think)
    have painted the room yesterday, so will wait till we get the carpets replaced and then replace the skirting at the same time :-)
    Originally posted by Minky2Slice

    I am guessing you will take off skirting before replacing carpet, in fact I would taake of skirting now before you even buy your carpet, gives you more time to fix any damage
    • fluffpot
    • By fluffpot 19th Jul 09, 7:12 PM
    • 1,246 Posts
    • 895 Thanks
    fluffpot
    Don't forget to be careful when removing the skirting boards underneath sockets and switches as the cables will almost certainly run up behind them. I've also seen cases of electrical cables run BEHIND skirtings, so turn off the power and take a peek with a torch if you are in any doubt

    Good luck -but I'd go with the sanding option!

    Fluff
  • sillywilly
    thanks for the sugggestions, i would like to replace them, as most of it looks like it has come away from the walls already and the wood isnt in such a good condition anymore, plus some of it has been damaged (by previous owners i think)
    have painted the room yesterday, so will wait till we get the carpets replaced and then replace the skirting at the same time :-)
    Originally posted by Minky2Slice
    Usually you replace the skirtings BEFORE fitting new carpet - that way the fitter has something to fit up to. Usually you would only replace skirtings after fitting a wood, laminate or tiled - a hard floor.

    I have never seen skirting fitted on top of carpet and personally think it may be a bit odd. It all depends on what carpet you are using but if hessian backed that needs stretching and grippers then to have them under the skirting makes it nigh on impossible to replace the carpet with similar in the future. And also if you do, there will be a big gap that needs filling to match it up to the skirting.

    IMO it is the wrong way to do it...

    I said USUALLY - but each to their own eh!! Hope it looks good...

    Regards
    Last edited by sillywilly; 21-07-2009 at 4:46 PM. Reason: wrong information initially
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