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  • dacouch
    • #2
    • 6th Feb 09, 6:08 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Feb 09, 6:08 PM
    Unless you live in an area where Insurers insist you have certain types of locks before they will insure you eg London then I would suggest you say you do not have the locks.

    If you enter that you have key operated window locks and 5 lever mortice deadlocks etc you will get a small discount of probably 5% off the contents section. This will probably save you around 5 a year but in return for this you will either have NO THEFT COVER if you are broken into and have not used all of the locks or a massively increased excess.

    I generally recommend to my clients not to take the security discount then the policy will not have the above warranty

    If you are not sure do a quote with the security and without the security, find out what the saving is. The if you really want the security discount read the Insurance companies policy and find out whether they exclude theft claims if the locks were not used or increase the excess.

    (In some high crime areas mainly all of London and some other city centres the Insurers will insist you have the locks before you get cover).

    The locks you are refering to above are predominantly different types of Patio Door Lock
  • mattymoo
    • #3
    • 6th Feb 09, 6:10 PM
    • #3
    • 6th Feb 09, 6:10 PM
    1 - doors leading to garden.
    2 - Rim automatic deadlatch is commonly referred to as a Yale lock. It is fitted to the inner surface of the door as opposed to being set into the edge of the door like a mortice lock. Most rim locks will not meet the spec though as very few have a locking handle on the inside.
    This is needed to prevent thieves making an easy exit.

    Central rail - terminology is a bit odd there but I suspect it is along similar lines to a key operated multi-point locking system. These are found on UPVC doors. When you turn the key, mushroom headed bolts slide across to engage locking points in the frame.

    EDIT - just did some digging on this. I spent 15 years as a Security Surveyor for insurers and never came across this term. It seems that Endsleigh use it in their quote engine and I suspect this is where Confused have picked it up from. I suspect if you were to ask Endsleigh staff they could not describe such a lock as the term has no recognition in either Google or the security industry in general.
    Closest thing I can think of is a multipoint lock with espagnolettes, top and bottom. Use google images to see what I mean.

    Rim automatic deadlatches - see these models on the Yale and Chubb sites.

    Yale - see http://www.yalelock.co.uk/en/yale/couk/ProductsDB/?groupId=184 . The Maximum and High Security (model P1/P2 only) locks will meet the Confused.com wording. However, some insurers look for British Standard rim locks and these are in the Maximum category.

    Chubb - on page 3 of this PDF - http://www.mul-t-lock.co.uk/uploads/file/pdfs/chubb/rimlocks.pdf the High Security and Double security will meet the Confused spec but most insurers will look for the High security lock if this is the only lock fitted to the door.
    Quite often the rimlock / yale lock is fitted in conjunction with a British Standard mortice deadlock. You use the rimlock when you are at home and the deadlock when you go out.
    Last edited by mattymoo; 06-02-2009 at 6:23 PM.
  • M271
    • #4
    • 6th Feb 09, 6:16 PM
    • #4
    • 6th Feb 09, 6:16 PM
    I've been going through the same process as you to try and make sense of the door lock requirements of several Insurance Companies. Some specify 5 lever mortice on all doors, some on only the main door, some specify locking bolts on opening leaves of double doors such as French Windows.

    I nearly met the requirements but had one door and french windows that don't.

    In the end I went with Direct Line because they were cheaper than my other quotes and they appear to not specify in their documentation or when getting the online quote what the door locks should be.

    A Rim Deadlock is the front door type lock that locks when the door is shut, it often looks like a brass metal box on the inside of the door.

    Multipoint locking are typically on double glassed windows and patio doors, the locking handle when turned moves rods into either the top and bottom of the opening or slides a bar up and down on several point on the sode of the opening.
  • tbrammer
    • #5
    • 9th Jun 10, 8:26 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Jun 10, 8:26 PM
    I have just moved into a rented property in Beaconsfield and the doors do not have the required locks. I am unlikely to be able to get the landlord to pay for new locks. I have tried Direct Line and Churchill and found that neither of them will offer a policy without the prescribed locks.
    Does anyone know of an insurance company that offers insurance without the requirement to have the locks?
    Thanks.
  • Muttly
    • #6
    • 9th Feb 12, 5:16 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Feb 12, 5:16 PM
    Confused.com has really confused me over their door lock choices for home insurance.

    1. Am I right in assuming "Patio/French doors" = doors leading to garden? Or would that go under 'other exits'?

    2. What is a:
    - "Rim automatic deadlatch with key locking handle"?
    - "Central rail key operated lock"?
    - "Key operated multi-point locking system"?

    :confused:
    Originally posted by candyflossing
    I have a flat the lock on my door is a five lever deadlock. the lock is set into the wood and there is no steel keep for the lock. this means the door can be easily kicked in. I was not happy with this.
    They tell me this is covered by my insurance???? Hello?!!?
  • Muttly
    • #7
    • 9th Feb 12, 5:26 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Feb 12, 5:26 PM
    I have just moved into a rented property in Beaconsfield and the doors do not have the required locks. I am unlikely to be able to get the landlord to pay for new locks. I have tried Direct Line and Churchill and found that neither of them will offer a policy without the prescribed locks.
    Does anyone know of an insurance company that offers insurance without the requirement to have the locks?
    Thanks.
    Originally posted by tbrammer
    You wont get insurance without the proper locks. Just make sure the lock has a steel keep or lock housing, if the lock, locks onto the wood it can be kicked in easily. A locksmith says this also invalidates your insurance. The housing/renters will lie about this to save money.
    Good luck, a good lock costs 40 and about the same to get fitted.
  • mikey72
    • #8
    • 9th Feb 12, 5:49 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Feb 12, 5:49 PM
    These are three very specific types of lock.

    They can't be advised easily over the internet, there are very similar styles, which won't meet the requirements.

    Take a photo of your existing locks, and visit a decent locksmith to ask him what it is.
    Or post it up on here.
  • LocksmithLiverpool
    • #9
    • 15th Feb 13, 7:40 PM
    • #9
    • 15th Feb 13, 7:40 PM
    Hi
    Ive read this thread with some interest, does your Insurance require 5 Lever locks or British Standard 5 Lever locks? The difference is in the quality. It is possible to buy a 5 Lever Mortice for a few pound however these will be imported locks and very poor quality. British Standard Locks are a different lock all together. I would guess the cheap locks could be kicked in quite easily whereas you are more likely to split the door or frame if you tried to kick a British Standard Lock in. If in doubt British Standard Locks carry a kitemark and have a 20mm bolt throw as opposed to the older types which have a 14mm bolt throw. Hope this helps.
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