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    • marineville
    • By marineville 1st Jun 12, 1:13 PM
    • 23 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    marineville
    • #2
    • 1st Jun 12, 1:13 PM
    directly onto soil...
    • #2
    • 1st Jun 12, 1:13 PM
    it encourages the migration of worms which is absolutely a good thing, plus i'm sure it helps with moisture regulation which, again, is a good thing for optimising composting. i would've thought that any lack of light onto the plants underneath will kill off any plants that might try to grow in the bin. so much better than trying to compost on concrete... and tidier.
    • tim_n
    • By tim_n 1st Jun 12, 1:43 PM
    • 1,549 Posts
    • 1,309 Thanks
    tim_n
    • #3
    • 1st Jun 12, 1:43 PM
    • #3
    • 1st Jun 12, 1:43 PM
    Exactly as marineville has said.

    I've gone straight onto the ground weeds and all. They started to grow up, but as I've dumped more grass and food waste the heat and excess moisture has done for the weeds. It's not balanced (too much green, not enough brown) but it's getting there.

    If you've got a few spades of your old compost to put in the bottom which has worms and the bacteria, it'll work equally well on concrete, but will make a mess when you turn it

    Hope that helps!
    Tim
  • JMurph
    • #4
    • 1st Jun 12, 2:53 PM
    • #4
    • 1st Jun 12, 2:53 PM
    I just used a black plastic rubbish bin with a lid, and drilled lots and lots of holes through the bottom and some round the sides, to let air/worms in. It's worked a treat!
    • Greenqueen
    • By Greenqueen 2nd Jun 12, 3:53 PM
    • 305 Posts
    • 512 Thanks
    Greenqueen
    • #5
    • 2nd Jun 12, 3:53 PM
    • #5
    • 2nd Jun 12, 3:53 PM
    I did the same (a plastic dustbin) but now that its full its too heavy to lift to turn out!
    • Farway
    • By Farway 2nd Jun 12, 6:53 PM
    • 4,893 Posts
    • 4,079 Thanks
    Farway
    • #6
    • 2nd Jun 12, 6:53 PM
    • #6
    • 2nd Jun 12, 6:53 PM
    I did the same (a plastic dustbin) but now that its full its too heavy to lift to turn out!
    Originally posted by Greenqueen
    I just push my Dalek over & go from there
  • Leif
    • #7
    • 2nd Jun 12, 10:49 PM
    • #7
    • 2nd Jun 12, 10:49 PM
    I checked my second pile, a mix of wood chips, turf and grass, and bindweed had grown through a foot of the pile, to the surface. The roots in the soil are thick. I suspect a 'dalek' is the way to go as the top will prevent the bindweed from photosynthesizing, and it might exhaust itself.
    • EpsomOldie
    • By EpsomOldie 3rd Jun 12, 1:09 AM
    • 175 Posts
    • 466 Thanks
    EpsomOldie
    • #8
    • 3rd Jun 12, 1:09 AM
    • #8
    • 3rd Jun 12, 1:09 AM
    I place some concrete slabs around the edge of my (lidded) bin. From the outside it looks like it's standing on concrete, however there's a clear area of earth in the middle to allow worms in. The concrete edging prevents mice from getting into the nice warm heap, and when it comes to emptying it, it provides a firm edge to stand on.
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