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  • FIRST POST
    • Nathaniel Essex
    • By Nathaniel Essex 10th Jul 18, 6:51 PM
    • 116Posts
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    Nathaniel Essex
    Getting a weekend job where you'll be "overqualified"
    • #1
    • 10th Jul 18, 6:51 PM
    Getting a weekend job where you'll be "overqualified" 10th Jul 18 at 6:51 PM
    Hi all.

    I work in professional services and money is tight for a number of reasons and I am spending more than I am earning for the most part. I am looking for a second job I can do over the weekend and I want some advice.

    How do I apply for a job where I will immediately been seen as overqualified? I am thinking of getting a job at my local Tesco but have no idea how to tailor a CV without outright lying about what I am currently doing.

    I also wanted to know if there were any professional or relatively high paying jobs I can do on the weekend that anyone could recommend?
Page 1
    • comeandgo
    • By comeandgo 10th Jul 18, 6:57 PM
    • 2,175 Posts
    • 2,961 Thanks
    comeandgo
    • #2
    • 10th Jul 18, 6:57 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Jul 18, 6:57 PM
    I worked in a bar at weekends and nights, I was vastly over qualified for this as a full time job but as a casual job the managers took no notice of my qualifications, just could I do the job. Don't lie on your CV and don't omit details as you will possibly meet people who know you and could make comments overheard by management.
    • Lorian
    • By Lorian 10th Jul 18, 7:10 PM
    • 4,512 Posts
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    Lorian
    • #3
    • 10th Jul 18, 7:10 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Jul 18, 7:10 PM
    If you go to Tesco just watch out if they offer you a flexible contract that you aren't also signing up to flex hours your can't do. Last page of the contract, but best to discuss at interview!
    • xapprenticex
    • By xapprenticex 10th Jul 18, 7:13 PM
    • 1,520 Posts
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    xapprenticex
    • #4
    • 10th Jul 18, 7:13 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Jul 18, 7:13 PM
    Im actually interested in doing a little weekend Asda/Tesco work, i work in 'professional services' too but as a weekend job i would rather not have to use my brain so would be happiest stacking shelves.

    Seems like its easier to get that work if you 'know' someone, but i don't know anyone who is working in retail.
    • Lorian
    • By Lorian 10th Jul 18, 7:18 PM
    • 4,512 Posts
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    Lorian
    • #5
    • 10th Jul 18, 7:18 PM
    • #5
    • 10th Jul 18, 7:18 PM
    You don't need to know someone to get a shelf stacking or home shopping job. just check indeed.co.uk or reed.co.uk - I live in the middle of nowhere and I see they come up quite often locally due to the unsociable/different hours. Application is typically by form not CV. You fill in a form and do might get invited to do a test online, then are likely to get phone interview then a group interview if successful. (This is all 3rd hand - I've not been through the process myself).
    • stoopy
    • By stoopy 10th Jul 18, 7:29 PM
    • 50 Posts
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    stoopy
    • #6
    • 10th Jul 18, 7:29 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Jul 18, 7:29 PM
    Driving for out of hours services?
    Grocery Challenge Jul 380.75 Aug 637?/475 Sep 32.57/475
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    MFW2018 #183 0/2000
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 10th Jul 18, 8:06 PM
    • 32,544 Posts
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    DCFC79
    • #7
    • 10th Jul 18, 8:06 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Jul 18, 8:06 PM
    Seems like its easier to get that work if you 'know' someone, but i don't know anyone who is working in retail.
    Originally posted by xapprenticex

    Not always, I applied for a job via the retailers website.


    OP if its bar works your after OP ask in your local Wetherspoons or something like indeed.
    • Brynsam
    • By Brynsam 10th Jul 18, 8:18 PM
    • 1,562 Posts
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    Brynsam
    • #8
    • 10th Jul 18, 8:18 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Jul 18, 8:18 PM
    I also wanted to know if there were any professional or relatively high paying jobs I can do on the weekend that anyone could recommend?
    Originally posted by Nathaniel Essex
    You say you work in 'professional services', which could mean anything. Could you be specific about your area of expertise, please?
    • Les79
    • By Les79 10th Jul 18, 11:51 PM
    • 434 Posts
    • 533 Thanks
    Les79
    • #9
    • 10th Jul 18, 11:51 PM
    • #9
    • 10th Jul 18, 11:51 PM
    Maybe seek advice on your financial situation so that you can get that under control and support yourself on your primary income?

    Work to Live, or Live to Work.
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 11th Jul 18, 5:46 AM
    • 2,102 Posts
    • 3,205 Thanks
    shortcrust
    People really do rate themselves.

    You can only be overqualified in your own field. I'm a "professional" but I wouldn't be overqualified for a job in bar/restaurant/supermarket. I'd have no relevant qualifications or experience.

    My favourite barman has a PhD and the first person I ever managed used to be a solicitor but wanted a low stress part time admin job when her kids started school.

    Edit to add something helpful in addition to the churlish reply above:

    I would give accurate info on the CV but I'd be very brief about irrelevant stuff. For example, I wouldn't list professional accreditations or the fine details of my work. I'd put the qualifications they're asking for first. So if they wanted 5 A-C GCSEs including Maths and English, that would be the first and most detailed bit of my qualifications section, secondary to degrees and the like. I'd add a chunky 'Relevant Skills and Experience' section at the start where I'd try to draw out aspects of my work that match with the job spec. I'm self employed so I order all the things I need for my job so I might use that to talk about stock control. Stuff like that. It's just like any other application. Help them to tick off every bit on the job spec.

    I changed careers in my 30s and the first interview I had in the new field was a disaster because I was underprepared and over confident. Believe me, the difficult bit won't be downplaying your qualifications. It'll be demonstrating you're as good as someone who's worked in a supermarket all their life.
    Last edited by shortcrust; 11-07-2018 at 6:59 AM.
    • Ineededaname
    • By Ineededaname 11th Jul 18, 7:49 AM
    • 58 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    Ineededaname
    How does working in the financial services make you overqualified to work in retail? They are completley different roles. At the end of the day an experienced retail worker is going to trump you for the job every time. They are more qualified than you.

    They are going to have concerns but not in the way you are thinking. Going in thinking you are too qualified for the role is going to compound their concerns, not allay them.

    Retail in general won't be too concerned with your lack of experience, as they can train you easily enough. Their concerns will be things like:

    - Is he going to stick the job for a decent length of time?
    - Can he adapt to a *completley* different working environment.
    - Will he work well under pressure when it's not his main role.
    - Will he be willing to work early starts and late nights.
    - Will he be available to work additional hours in busy periods such as Christmas and Easter, when he is accustomed to time off.
    - How will he react to rude customers who speak to him like he's beneath them.
    - Will he work well under potentially young and 'unqualified' supervisors.

    The challenge here is that retail can be a very tough job in a different way to what you are used to, and they are going to worry you won't hack it when your easy weekend job doesn't turn out to be so easy.

    You've had advice about applications already. Just remember at an interview you need to show them why your situation is a good for them and not that it could be a potential problem.
    • GlasweJen
    • By GlasweJen 11th Jul 18, 8:31 AM
    • 6,647 Posts
    • 12,027 Thanks
    GlasweJen
    The last thing you want to tell Tesco is that you're a professional with financial problems who wants shifts at their busiest times. It isn't unknown for people to take jobs in supermarkets purely to attempt to scam them out of money, particularly "clever" people who have come up with a "system".

    Ones I've seen (or been witness to the disciplinary) include: reducing everything they want to buy to 1p then getting a family member to go through self scan, emptying the notes into a pod then the pod never making it to the cash office because he'd kicked it under his chair and not into the tube, telling an old lady she'd won 2 on a scratchcard and not 2000, some elaborate system of putting through goodwill 2 (The supermarket used to do this whenever something didn't scan through at the same price as on the shelf) but keeping the cards and not giving them to the customer.

    There were more but those were the highlights, all of them "professionals" looking for a "job that didn't tax their brains", or "additional income to fund an extension/another car/driving lessons for their 17 year old". One of them lost their professional job too because the supermarket pressed charges and their registered body found out and counted it as fraud.
    Bounts, Quidco, Shop and Scan, Receipt Hog, Costco Cashback, Debit card cashback

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    (unless it's on offer and can get my loyalty points)
    • keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • By keepcalmandstayoutofdebt 11th Jul 18, 8:35 AM
    • 3,363 Posts
    • 1,749 Thanks
    keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    Hi all.

    I work in professional services and money is tight for a number of reasons and I am spending more than I am earning for the most part. I am looking for a second job I can do over the weekend and I want some advice.

    How do I apply for a job where I will immediately been seen as overqualified? I am thinking of getting a job at my local Tesco but have no idea how to tailor a CV without outright lying about what I am currently doing.

    I also wanted to know if there were any professional or relatively high paying jobs I can do on the weekend that anyone could recommend?
    Originally posted by Nathaniel Essex
    Have you had the conversation with Manager of the supreme main job???

    Yes you can apply to this supermarket, whilst the recruiting policy can vary store to store, ours will have anyone in and offer flex - as much as the Jobcentre get laughed up for trying to get people in the wrong positions...apply to T for one position and you'll be interviewed for another. and they make full use of the three month probation period should you not achieve. If you don't get an induction on Saturday, then you will be expected to roll up on a working day for this.

    As for professional weekend jobs they are out there - that is your own search to do.
    "If you are caught in a rainstorm, once you accept that you'll receive a soaking, the only thing left to do is enjoy the walk"
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 11th Jul 18, 9:38 AM
    • 33,044 Posts
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    getmore4less
    Check your contract for terms that require you to notify your current employer.
    • Malthusian
    • By Malthusian 11th Jul 18, 11:17 AM
    • 4,640 Posts
    • 7,415 Thanks
    Malthusian
    Going to the Debt-Free Wannabe board and posting a Statement of Assets is likely to be far more help than this one.

    If the reasons for the overspending are not addressed, then working on the weekends will not help at all. You will still be overspending, only now you will be stressed, tired and burned out as well. The worst case scenario is that your mental health deteriorates to the point you can't do your main job and your financial problems get even worse.

    If you have a nine-to-five job in professional services in the UK then income is not the problem, expenditure is.

    I also wanted to know if there were any professional or relatively high paying jobs I can do on the weekend that anyone could recommend?
    Originally posted by Nathaniel Essex
    Why do you think we would know more than you about the availability of weekend contract jobs in your chosen field when you haven't even told us what it is?
    • Les79
    • By Les79 11th Jul 18, 11:21 AM
    • 434 Posts
    • 533 Thanks
    Les79
    Edit to add something helpful in addition to the churlish reply above:
    Originally posted by shortcrust
    Why is it churlish?

    The only assumption I made was that this "professional services" job was full time, however if that holds true then it is foolish NOT to query why OP isn't trying to address the underlying issue of expenditure > income from a financial perspective.

    Getting a part time job in addition could simply be papering over the cracks a lot of the time. In that respect, I think that OP would be wise to at least consider what I proposed.

    Sadly, comments like yours ("churlish") are an unnecessary distraction from the fact that I was just trying to help OP.
    • Les79
    • By Les79 11th Jul 18, 11:24 AM
    • 434 Posts
    • 533 Thanks
    Les79
    Going to the Debt-Free Wannabe board and posting a Statement of Assets is likely to be far more help than this one.

    If the reasons for the overspending are not addressed, then working on the weekends will not help at all. You will still be overspending, only now you will be stressed, tired and burned out as well. The worst case scenario is that your mental health deteriorates to the point you can't do your main job and your financial problems get even worse.

    If you have a nine-to-five job in professional services in the UK then income is not the problem, expenditure is.



    Why do you think we would know more than you about the availability of weekend contract jobs in your chosen field when you haven't even told us what it is?
    Originally posted by Malthusian
    Oh god, another user who is being "churlish"
    • LuSiVe
    • By LuSiVe 11th Jul 18, 1:41 PM
    • 839 Posts
    • 1,120 Thanks
    LuSiVe
    Why is it churlish?
    Originally posted by Les79
    I read it that they meant the first half of their *own* post was churlish.
    • Les79
    • By Les79 11th Jul 18, 11:13 PM
    • 434 Posts
    • 533 Thanks
    Les79
    I read it that they meant the first half of their *own* post was churlish.
    Originally posted by LuSiVe
    Ah! Apologies to shortcrust if that is the case.
    • snowqueen555
    • By snowqueen555 11th Jul 18, 11:39 PM
    • 744 Posts
    • 516 Thanks
    snowqueen555
    I cut down to part time to find other areas of work, signing up to two bank staff jobs recently.

    I think bank positions in any sector is a good place to try, they know you have a day job and need extra work, and weekends are usually where they are most desperate to fill.
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