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  • FIRST POST
    • Cocketts
    • By Cocketts 7th Jul 18, 9:40 AM
    • 89Posts
    • 1,102Thanks
    Cocketts
    A Pot of Tea - and a Stamp!
    • #1
    • 7th Jul 18, 9:40 AM
    A Pot of Tea - and a Stamp! 7th Jul 18 at 9:40 AM
    I had my sister and her family visiting last weekend. In my efforts to reduce plastic usage Chez Lillibet, I have swapped tea bags for 'real tea'.
    I was amused when my 25-year old niece (whose turn it was to make the cuppas) admitted that she didn't know how to make tea in a pot!!

    I was then reminded of an incident about three weeks ago when my 22-year old daughter had to be told how to go the post office counter and ask for a first class stamp......

    These may not be 'important' skills to teach this generation but what else might they need to know - or do we assume they know?

    Correctly pegging out the washing on the line springs to mind!

    Lilli

    EDITED TO ADD: I'm not sure my daughter would know how to write a cheque either
    Last edited by Cocketts; 07-07-2018 at 9:44 AM.
Page 1
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 7th Jul 18, 9:45 AM
    • 12,599 Posts
    • 174,681 Thanks
    MrsLurcherwalker
    • #2
    • 7th Jul 18, 9:45 AM
    • #2
    • 7th Jul 18, 9:45 AM
    Pulling the curtains in hot weather on the rooms currently with the sun on them and then swapping to the other side of the house as the sun moves round and opening windows on the shade side?

    How cook basic meals from cheaper cuts of meat if you eat it.

    How to keep a basic store cupboard and how to date mark things in it and rotate the stock so nothing goes out of date.

    How to repair clothes and basics like sewing on a button, darning too and giving them the make do and mend mentality in the first place.

    I'm sure there is an endless list, if I come up with anything else I'll add it on later xxx.
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • jfdi
    • By jfdi 7th Jul 18, 9:49 AM
    • 989 Posts
    • 1,487 Thanks
    jfdi
    • #3
    • 7th Jul 18, 9:49 AM
    • #3
    • 7th Jul 18, 9:49 AM
    Examples from recent months....

    Sterilising baby bottles without an electric steriliser.
    Unbunging a sink without !!!8216;Mr Muscle!!!8217; or similar, never even heard of a plunger!
    Baking basic cakes without a recipe.
    Making a phone call without a mobile....
    Writing a cheque!

    That!!!8217;ll do for now!
    • vulpix
    • By vulpix 7th Jul 18, 9:54 AM
    • 907 Posts
    • 16,306 Thanks
    vulpix
    • #4
    • 7th Jul 18, 9:54 AM
    • #4
    • 7th Jul 18, 9:54 AM
    Agree to all the above.Would like to add washing up instead of a dish washer,cooking in general,and mopping a floor with mop and bucket.Witnessed my 16 year old mopping the floor the other day!She just randomly jabbed the floor with a sopping mop,and she mops the floor at work in a cafe!
    • monnagran
    • By monnagran 7th Jul 18, 10:14 AM
    • 3,969 Posts
    • 53,780 Thanks
    monnagran
    • #5
    • 7th Jul 18, 10:14 AM
    • #5
    • 7th Jul 18, 10:14 AM
    Doing the washing in the sink and wringing it out by hand. (was going to say "fair hands," but after doing this for a year they are very far from fair.) My son was astonished to see me doing this.

    Washing machine on the horizon once I've moved house.
    I believe that friends are quiet angels
    Who lift us to our feet when our wings
    Have trouble remembering how to fly.
    • Callie22
    • By Callie22 7th Jul 18, 10:18 AM
    • 3,181 Posts
    • 8,710 Thanks
    Callie22
    • #6
    • 7th Jul 18, 10:18 AM
    • #6
    • 7th Jul 18, 10:18 AM
    Agree to all the above.Would like to add washing up instead of a dish washer,cooking in general,and mopping a floor with mop and bucket.Witnessed my 16 year old mopping the floor the other day!She just randomly jabbed the floor with a sopping mop,and she mops the floor at work in a cafe!
    Originally posted by vulpix

    To be fair, I think this has long been a skill that's been lacking About twenty years ago I worked in catering and a lot of our staff were 16-21 year olds doing a summer job. None of them knew how to mop a floor, we ended up running a training session as they'd literally dip the mop in the bucket and slop it onto the floor, which was a real safety hazard.

    Re: tea leaves, this was also something I didn't know as a child. I once made my grandad a pot of tea with leaves and he ended up with a very 'chewy' cup of tea, as I just assumed that they dissolved in the water! And I also had to write my first cheque in nearly eight years the other day, amusingly I'm still only half-way through the only cheque book I've ever owned!
    • Cocketts
    • By Cocketts 7th Jul 18, 12:24 PM
    • 89 Posts
    • 1,102 Thanks
    Cocketts
    • #7
    • 7th Jul 18, 12:24 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Jul 18, 12:24 PM
    DD probably wouldn't know what 'hospital corners' were either......
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 7th Jul 18, 1:08 PM
    • 3,909 Posts
    • 6,132 Thanks
    bouicca21
    • #8
    • 7th Jul 18, 1:08 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Jul 18, 1:08 PM
    It must be at least 15 years ago that I discovered that lots of kids were so used to being ferried round by their parents that they did not know how to work out a route (even a simple one) using public transport and couldn't read a timetable.
    • Prinzessilein
    • By Prinzessilein 7th Jul 18, 1:16 PM
    • 2,434 Posts
    • 11,253 Thanks
    Prinzessilein
    • #9
    • 7th Jul 18, 1:16 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Jul 18, 1:16 PM
    I have mentioned previously on Old Style about a woman I saw buying a new pair of trainers for her lad....the reason for the new pair?...the lace had snapped on the old pair!!!!...The concept of buying new laces and relacing the old pair had not occurred to them!

    I have seen younger relatives shocked speechless at the way in which both Mum and I could rustle up home baked scones warm and scrummy in less than half an hour (quicker than driving to Tescos, queueing up, and driving back!)

    I used to teach...and saw teenagers unable to read an analogue clock....they COULD tell the time, but only in digital format...two teenage relatives were given watches for Christmas, and pointed out they never wore them...they rely on their phones for the time.

    Cleaning shoes 'properly' is a skill modern society seems to lack....I remember knocking off the dirt, rubbing in the polish, leaving it to absorb into the leather , then a different brush to buff the shoes...and a cloth for the final polish...we had a proper shoe-cleaning kit for the job....today a quick wipe is all that is done.

    Oh and with Summer Holidays almost here....one skill that teenagers (and younger) seem to lack is how to entertain themselves for more than 30 seconds!...and if there was a powercut and computers/games consoles were unavailable I am certain half my young relatives would die of boredom within the first half hour!

    I KNOW I am no longer young....in my 50s....but so many of these 'basic' skills were taught at home...and at Brownies/Guides...we learned to make a proper pot of tea (and I served mine for my Brownie Hostess badge on a tray with a traycloth I had embroidered myself *smug!)...how to hand-wash your own socks (boy were those grass stains a job to get out by hand!)...sewing on a button (and ensuring it STAYED on in future!)
    • nursemaggie
    • By nursemaggie 7th Jul 18, 1:19 PM
    • 2,396 Posts
    • 31,914 Thanks
    nursemaggie
    My son only moved out a couple of months ago. He had to call me to ask how to clean glass i.e. the bathroom mirror. I thought I had taught him everything.



    There was a mop in the store cupboard in his flat. I asked if he wanted showing how to use it. No he preferred the old fashioned way. I can assure you there is not water on the floor when he is finished.
    • Brambling
    • By Brambling 7th Jul 18, 1:27 PM
    • 371 Posts
    • 1,843 Thanks
    Brambling
    I taught my nephews the 'proper' way to hang washing hang tops from the bottom and bottoms from the top and my sister puts her washing on the line

    Reading a washing label on clothes a couple of us were teaching the young guys in the office last week that those weird symbols meant something

    changing a electric plug, although to be honest I'm not sure the last time i did one.

    Reading a map
    • THIRZAH
    • By THIRZAH 7th Jul 18, 1:42 PM
    • 1,389 Posts
    • 7,119 Thanks
    THIRZAH
    Next time I visit DD I need to sew on DGS's badges from Beavers. DD can just about manage to sew on a button now but anything else is beyond her. My other DD has taught herself to sew and even bought a small sewing machine. I did try to teach them to sew when they were younger but they weren't interested so I didn't force it. I didn't learn to knit until I went to university and shared a house with two girls who knitted.
    • Farway
    • By Farway 7th Jul 18, 2:22 PM
    • 6,487 Posts
    • 10,754 Thanks
    Farway
    I think we may be missing a point, some things have slipped into history, how many of us could scythe the grass, repair a shoe using a last, repair a hole in a kettle? Light a coal fire, maybe repair a puncture in a bike tyre? Turn a collar?

    All but the last one I could do once upon a time
    • Prinzessilein
    • By Prinzessilein 7th Jul 18, 2:35 PM
    • 2,434 Posts
    • 11,253 Thanks
    Prinzessilein
    Faraway....look at the skills mentioned in this thread...

    Tea-making...shopping...cooking...sewing on a button...understanding laundry symbols...telling the time...using public transport...

    Are these REALLY skills that have slipped into history?...or are they skills that are relevant today?!

    (oh and if pushed I reckon I could still lay and light a fire, and mend a puncture in a bike tyre)
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 7th Jul 18, 2:52 PM
    • 12,599 Posts
    • 174,681 Thanks
    MrsLurcherwalker
    On a theme how to find, gather, process, season firewood and lay a fire and then light it, on from that keep it in overnight, on from that cook over it.....

    He Who Knows has just thrown in how to change a fuse, know where to turn off water, gas, electricity, how to relight a gas fired boiler and adjust the pressure on a new combi boiler.
    Last edited by MrsLurcherwalker; 07-07-2018 at 3:15 PM.
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • m1kjm
    • By m1kjm 7th Jul 18, 4:07 PM
    • 1,214 Posts
    • 2,364 Thanks
    m1kjm
    I've found that younger people in an office don't know that when telephoning a local number on a landline you don't need the area code because they have only made calls on a mobile where you need the area code, so they keep keying in the area code for local calls on a landline every time.

    Predicting the weather from looking at the clouds instead of using an app.

    Not just building and cooking on the fire, but also identifying the variety of tree your logs came from.
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 7th Jul 18, 6:22 PM
    • 12,096 Posts
    • 233,206 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    In my secondary school in the late seventies we were taught how to wire a plug (and made to draw a diagram of the inside of one including colouring in the cables). But I'd already been taught to do this by my mother. We were also taught how to write cheques, something I still do most weeks for a pal who runs a small business.

    Some very basic skills are being lost and the consquences are blocked sinks and mess and expense.

    For example, whenever I do youth hostelling, I encounter sinks which are blocked because folks cannot grasp that the first step to dishwashing is scraping any uneaten bits off the plate and into the bin. So many people, often mature and seemingly intelligent people, haven't managed to grasp this simple concept. I once watched the three mid-teen offspring of a family in a YHA kitchen make an unbeliveable fist of doing some washing up. The sum total of their task was to wash five mugs, five small plates with crumbs on them and five knives with butter/ jam smears. Three of them and they couldn't even do this without incredible difficulty.

    I'm normally good at blank expressions but must of looked a bit surprised at a level of ineptitude akin to a six year old's, because one of them sheepishly told me that they had a dishwasher at home.

    No sh*t Sherlock was my unspoken reaction, but I was thinking I hope to hell you never have to wash up anything really messy if this little task is beyond you!
    Last edited by GreyQueen; 07-07-2018 at 6:25 PM. Reason: spelling
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 7th Jul 18, 6:35 PM
    • 39,033 Posts
    • 35,914 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    I think we may be missing a point, some things have slipped into history, how many of us could scythe the grass, repair a shoe using a last, repair a hole in a kettle? Light a coal fire, maybe repair a puncture in a bike tyre? Turn a collar?

    All but the last one I could do once upon a time
    Originally posted by Farway
    My parents had a last when we cleared their house, but it's no longer a 'must-have' item on the wedding list, I guess.

    When they learn to drive, they need to be shown how to check the oil and the various other fluid levels on the car, although the first test is 'opening the bonnet'. Three of us spent quite a while scrabbling round the work van the other day, even with the manual we could not find the release bonnet lever. A 4th colleague found it. DH came to pick me up and I set him the challenge of finding it: even knowing which side it was it defeated him!

    Checking tyre pressures too.

    I think some of the above are now covered in the driving test. I haven't ever changed a wheel on the car but would give it a go if I had to!
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 2 hats 2 balaclavas for seamen, 1 balaclava for myself ...
    Current projects: Poppies, mohair cardigan pattern arrived and going strong!
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 7th Jul 18, 7:17 PM
    • 3,909 Posts
    • 6,132 Thanks
    bouicca21
    I am eternally grateful that I no longer have to lay a coal fire, turn a collar or do sides to middle for worn out sheets. TG these are no longer useful skills. Not too sure that we should lament the passing of clock faces either. Though come to think of it a digital Big Ben would be rather odd.
    • jk0
    • By jk0 7th Jul 18, 8:32 PM
    • 2,495 Posts
    • 25,504 Thanks
    jk0
    This thread is fun. It's not just millennials who are useless.

    My gf has her father staying with her, and she recently left him home alone for 3 weeks while she went on holiday. She came home to a freezer of ruined food, as the kitchen ring tripped and dad could not work out the cause.
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