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  • FIRST POST
    • Saeed
    • By Saeed 12th Apr 18, 9:44 AM
    • 703Posts
    • 133Thanks
    Saeed
    Secondment - tell my boss before applying or after getting the job??
    • #1
    • 12th Apr 18, 9:44 AM
    Secondment - tell my boss before applying or after getting the job?? 12th Apr 18 at 9:44 AM
    Hi,

    I am thinking of going for a secondment but am wondering if I should ask/tell my boss first (for permission and to see if they will let me etc) or after I have been offered the post (incase I don't get it and look like an idiot etc)?

    The secondment is for approx 1 year and 9 months.

    Any views??

    Thanks
Page 1
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 12th Apr 18, 9:57 AM
    • 39,031 Posts
    • 35,913 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    • #2
    • 12th Apr 18, 9:57 AM
    • #2
    • 12th Apr 18, 9:57 AM
    On the whole, I'd tend towards discussing it with them first, that way they can offer advice (if they have any) and also won't do a 'what are you talking about?' if any of the other managers say "what's that Saeed like, he seemed very keen in the interview" or similar.

    Also it may open other opportunities, flags up that you're looking for change: you can discuss why you're interested, they may have other suggestions, if it's because you're bored / not challenged then they may be able to offer more where you are.
    Still knitting!
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    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 12th Apr 18, 10:07 AM
    • 2,934 Posts
    • 4,319 Thanks
    ReadingTim
    • #3
    • 12th Apr 18, 10:07 AM
    • #3
    • 12th Apr 18, 10:07 AM
    Surely any secondment is dependent on whether you can be spared from your current role? So if your boss (or your boss's boss) says you can't be spared, you're unlikely to be able to take up the secondment, even if it was offered to you - which it won't be because you can't be spared from your current role.

    In my organisation, you need your line manager's permission to even apply. I would suggest you're going to need to discuss this with your manager.
    • Ozzuk
    • By Ozzuk 12th Apr 18, 10:16 AM
    • 1,435 Posts
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    Ozzuk
    • #4
    • 12th Apr 18, 10:16 AM
    • #4
    • 12th Apr 18, 10:16 AM
    As above, everywhere I've worked you've needed manager approval to apply for a secondment (but not an internal job) up front. Doesn't mean its the same for you, but does suggest it would be sensible to discuss it with them first.

    You may be asked at interview to talk about impact to your current role, manager feedback etc.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 12th Apr 18, 11:57 AM
    • 3,268 Posts
    • 8,809 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    • #5
    • 12th Apr 18, 11:57 AM
    • #5
    • 12th Apr 18, 11:57 AM
    Definitely speak to your boss.

    As others have said you will most likely need their approval anyway, but if you have a decent boss there is a good chance that they will be able to give you a few tips and advice on your application and some info about the new role.
    • agrinnall
    • By agrinnall 12th Apr 18, 12:00 PM
    • 20,988 Posts
    • 16,757 Thanks
    agrinnall
    • #6
    • 12th Apr 18, 12:00 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Apr 18, 12:00 PM
    I'm in agreement with everyone else. You should also bear in mind (and discuss it with your manager) that after such a lengthy secondment your current job may not be open for you when it finishes, so what will you do then?
    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 12th Apr 18, 12:29 PM
    • 2,934 Posts
    • 4,319 Thanks
    ReadingTim
    • #7
    • 12th Apr 18, 12:29 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Apr 18, 12:29 PM
    I would also suggest it's a good test on how your boss (and your company more generally) values you and your career development. Despite what they say, companies are loathed to move or promote you, as they have to find someone else to do what you were doing previously - they have a vested interest in keeping you doing what you're presently doing, at the wage you're presently doing it at.

    A good company and/or boss will encourage you to develop your skills and experience - a better one might even be frank and suggest that there aren't any opportunities for that with them.... in which case you can then think about whether to further your career elsewhere...
    • keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • By keepcalmandstayoutofdebt 13th Apr 18, 8:26 AM
    • 3,366 Posts
    • 1,750 Thanks
    keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • #8
    • 13th Apr 18, 8:26 AM
    • #8
    • 13th Apr 18, 8:26 AM
    Surely any secondment is dependent on whether you can be spared from your current role? So if your boss (or your boss's boss) says you can't be spared, you're unlikely to be able to take up the secondment, even if it was offered to you - which it won't be because you can't be spared from your current role.
    .
    Originally posted by ReadingTim
    This.

    I wanted to go on a day course recently, would never have been allowed as no one to spare me for.

    Currently had to watch a job I would love to do within current organisation be advertised following an internal move - again unable to apply and would never be considered or released from current role.
    "If you are caught in a rainstorm, once you accept that you'll receive a soaking, the only thing left to do is enjoy the walk"
    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 13th Apr 18, 9:44 AM
    • 2,934 Posts
    • 4,319 Thanks
    ReadingTim
    • #9
    • 13th Apr 18, 9:44 AM
    • #9
    • 13th Apr 18, 9:44 AM
    This.

    I wanted to go on a day course recently, would never have been allowed as no one to spare me for.

    Currently had to watch a job I would love to do within current organisation be advertised following an internal move - again unable to apply and would never be considered or released from current role.
    Originally posted by keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    I would suggest that unless you're happy in your current role, this might be a good signal to look elsewhere, as your current employer doesn't seem to place any value in any career development for you.
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