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  • FIRST POST
    • Mr Proctalgia
    • By Mr Proctalgia 1st Apr 06, 10:15 AM
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    Mr Proctalgia
    Difference between Gammon and Ham???
    • #1
    • 1st Apr 06, 10:15 AM
    Difference between Gammon and Ham??? 1st Apr 06 at 10:15 AM
    I have been wondering about this - Whats the difference? :confused:

    Is it the cut, or the method of preservation or what, usually I lurk around Morrisons butchers counter and try to snaffle some gammon joints when they are reduced but the other week I was in Sainsburys and they had what appeared to be really nice looking joints going for a quid so I bought two and did my usual thing of boiling them chilling and slicing, but they fell apart and were tasteless (They were in fact - reconstituted) So if any of you experts could help me I would be grateful as I'm missing me "Ham Butties" now!
    The quicker you fall behind, the longer you have to catch up...
Page 1
    • maryb
    • By maryb 1st Apr 06, 9:51 PM
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    maryb
    • #2
    • 1st Apr 06, 9:51 PM
    • #2
    • 1st Apr 06, 9:51 PM
    gammon is a ham joint that hasn't been cooked
    • Wickedkitten
    • By Wickedkitten 1st Apr 06, 10:48 PM
    • 1,820 Posts
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    Wickedkitten
    • #3
    • 1st Apr 06, 10:48 PM
    • #3
    • 1st Apr 06, 10:48 PM
    gammon is actually cured or smoked ham.
    • Mr Proctalgia
    • By Mr Proctalgia 1st Apr 06, 11:18 PM
    • 961 Posts
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    Mr Proctalgia
    • #4
    • 1st Apr 06, 11:18 PM
    • #4
    • 1st Apr 06, 11:18 PM
    Now I'm really confused because I think that any bits of pig that are not raw I.E. Pork are cured anyway. By this I mean treated essentially with Salt Petre and other flavourings. So is Gammon double cured ham or what? All pork that is cured is pink - right? ? So Gammon is cured (and obviously Ham too) But what is the difference in reality?.
    The quicker you fall behind, the longer you have to catch up...
    • Pink.
    • By Pink. 1st Apr 06, 11:25 PM
    • 17,431 Posts
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    Pink.
    • #5
    • 1st Apr 06, 11:25 PM
    • #5
    • 1st Apr 06, 11:25 PM
    Found this for you Mr Proctalgia. I read it a couple of times and I'm still not sure what the answer is. :confused:
    • Mr Proctalgia
    • By Mr Proctalgia 1st Apr 06, 11:33 PM
    • 961 Posts
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    Mr Proctalgia
    • #6
    • 1st Apr 06, 11:33 PM
    • #6
    • 1st Apr 06, 11:33 PM
    Thanks PW - I too was Googling around for an answer but it seems that there isn't one, its all pigs legs and smoke out there, I may try the Gammon in Coke recipe - It sounds facinating.

    Thanks for your efforts
    The quicker you fall behind, the longer you have to catch up...
  • apple_mint
    • #7
    • 2nd Apr 06, 5:07 AM
    • #7
    • 2nd Apr 06, 5:07 AM
    I bought a piece of gammon at the farmers market yesterday. Popped it into the slow cooker in about an inch of water. Smothered it in some honey and cooked for 6 hours on medium (Morphy Richard's 6.6 ltr slow cooker). It was gorgeous and having had some for dinner it will also do us several more meals.
    Enjoying an MSE OS life
  • point3
    • #8
    • 2nd Apr 06, 7:42 AM
    • #8
    • 2nd Apr 06, 7:42 AM
    Thanks PW - I too was Googling around for an answer but it seems that there isn't one, its all pigs legs and smoke out there, I may try the Gammon in Coke recipe - It sounds facinating.
    by Mr Proctalgia
    Do try the gammon in coca-cola - it gives the ham a lovely sweet 'honey' type glaze.

    Back to your question...

    Ham refers to the thigh cut of pork - this term would apply whether it had been cured or not. In general use however we only refer to the cured meat as ham.

    Gammon refers specifically to a cured ham cut.

    Flamb! me if I'm wrong
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 2nd Apr 06, 8:58 AM
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    thriftlady
    • #9
    • 2nd Apr 06, 8:58 AM
    • #9
    • 2nd Apr 06, 8:58 AM
    Isn't the main difference that gammon is raw and ham is cooked? They are both cured,and made from the leg of the pig.
    • TOBRUK
    • By TOBRUK 2nd Apr 06, 9:16 AM
    • 2,293 Posts
    • 2,757 Thanks
    TOBRUK
    I may try the Gammon in Coke recipe - It sounds facinating.
    It is lovely - I often make it - boil it in coke, then cut the skin, leaving some fat and score cross ways, press in a few cloves, then rub in honey, dry mustard and demerara sugar put in oven for about 20 mins - georgious.
    • janiebaby29
    • By janiebaby29 7th Dec 09, 10:00 AM
    • 1,727 Posts
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    janiebaby29
    Whats the difference between a gammon joint and a ham joint ??
    I want to do jamie olivers jerk ham , but am confused about the joints
    The original janiebaby
    • cooking-mama
    • By cooking-mama 7th Dec 09, 11:19 AM
    • 2,066 Posts
    • 2,392 Thanks
    cooking-mama
    might be wrong but i think its called gammon when raw,but ham when cooked??
  • newhouseowner
    From wikipedia..
    Gammon may also be:
    A particular cut of bacon or ham (from an Old Northern French word jambe for hind-leg of the pig)

    So I guess "gammon" is a particular cut of "ham".
    • Pink.
    • By Pink. 7th Dec 09, 12:09 PM
    • 17,431 Posts
    • 40,365 Thanks
    Pink.
    Hi janie,

    There's an earlier discussion on the difference between gammon and ham that may helpl so I'll add your thread to it to keep the replies together.

    Pink
  • seraphina
    IIRC, both ham and gammon are cured.

    My understanding is that gammon is cut after the whole carcass has been cured, whilst ham is first cut from the carcass and then cured.
    • purpleivy
    • By purpleivy 7th Dec 09, 2:57 PM
    • 3,431 Posts
    • 20,884 Thanks
    purpleivy
    It is lovely - I often make it - boil it in coke, then cut the skin, leaving some fat and score cross ways, press in a few cloves, then rub in honey, dry mustard and demerara sugar put in oven for about 20 mins - georgious.
    Originally posted by TOBRUK

    I haven't met anyone that has enjoyed Nigella's 'tumble down' recipe with the black bean soup yet!
    "Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad"
    Trying not to waste food!
    • FarleyFlavors
    • By FarleyFlavors 7th Dec 09, 3:08 PM
    • 35 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    FarleyFlavors
    Just to confuse matters, in Scotland the terms are used differently than in England. What the Scots call "ham" is what the English call "bacon", i.e. cured pork. In Scotland, "gammon" is what the English call "ham", i.e. thinly sliced cooked pork. The latter is also known as "cooked ham".
  • purpleheather2810
    Hmm well I'm non the wiser I'm afraid!
    • Tombo
    • By Tombo 31st Dec 09, 1:29 AM
    • 960 Posts
    • 831 Thanks
    Tombo
    Isn't gammon raw when bought but ham is safe to eat?
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  • charliee
    I haven't met anyone that has enjoyed Nigella's 'tumble down' recipe with the black bean soup yet!
    Originally posted by purpleivy
    when i made this gammon last year i did use the stock, i made a sort of noodle soup with it. the sweetness worked really well with a bit of vinegar and a little chopped chilli.. sort of hot and sour style...
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