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Vulnerable Children Not Protected.

edited 30 November -1 at 12:00AM in Discussion Time
99 replies 894 views
2456710

Replies

  • choille wrote: »
    No, the authorities.
    Under Labour both at local and national levels.
  • choillechoille Forumite
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    Nick_C wrote: »
    Labour controlled authorities. Under a Labour Government.

    Although to be fair, the people on the ground were probably prevented from doing their jobs properly because of Labour inspired Political Correctness.

    Rubbish - there was something more sinister going on - one victims DNA was found in a police vehicle.

    The race card is a distraction. If you had listened to the NW chief prosecutor who warns that their will be other victims unless heed is paid to the failings that occurred.
  • edited 15 January 2020 at 9:08AM
    CornucopiaCornucopia Forumite
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    edited 15 January 2020 at 9:08AM
    choille wrote: »
    ... the failings that occurred.

    What were the failings?
    The race card is a distraction...

    I think that's slightly disingenuous (and it's not technically "the race card"). There were vitriolic discussions in the communities concerned and all over social media at the time as to whether race was a factor in both the offending and in terms of the somewhat negligent attitude of the authorities towards protection of the victims.

    In an ideal world, and if they had complied with stated policy, the approach would have been two-fold, multi-agency: protect the victims and prosecute the offenders. That should have been done without fear or favour and irrespective of the identities of either group.
    ex Board Guide

  • rupertsruperts Forumite
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    The lack of investigation in these cases was less to do with the race of the offenders and more to do with the class of the victims.

    They were often rough, foul mouthed, sometimes aggressive teenage girls and society at the time was going through a period of mocking "chavs" for all they were worth.

    To society the victims were just "feral youths" who had been poorly raised by "benefit scum" parents and if they got themselves in trouble being out late at night it was just what they deserved. Nobody cared about them, nobody listened to them, nobody trusted them.

    Blame Labour, blame political correctness if it makes you feel better. But the truth is if you've ever used the words in quotes above or similar ones or felt supporting of people who have used them, then you were part of the problem. I would include myself in that and it has caused me to reflect on my own attitude towards certain parts of society.
  • choillechoille Forumite
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    Cornucopia wrote: »
    What were the failings?



    I think that's slightly disingenuous (and it's not technically "the race card"). There were vitriolic discussions in the communities concerned and all over social media at the time as to whether race was a factor in both the offending and in terms of the somewhat negligent attitude of the authorities towards protection of the victims.

    In an ideal world, and if they had complied with stated policy, the approach would have been two-fold, multi-agency: protect the victims and prosecute the offenders. That should have been done without fear or favour and irrespective of the identities of either group.

    So, you are saying, repeating the media myth that is was because of race that the social services allowed these girls to be raped? That police dropped the investigation?
    That is nonsense.
  • choillechoille Forumite
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    ruperts wrote: »
    The lack of investigation in these cases was less to do with the race of the offenders and more to do with the class of the victims.

    They were often rough, foul mouthed, sometimes aggressive teenage girls and society at the time was going through a period of mocking "chavs" for all they were worth.

    To society the victims were just "feral youths" who had been poorly raised by "benefit scum" parents and if they got themselves in trouble being out late at night it was just what they deserved. Nobody cared about them, nobody listened to them, nobody trusted them.

    Blame Labour, blame political correctness if it makes you feel better. But the truth is if you've ever used the words in quotes above or similar ones or felt supporting of people who have used them, then you were part of the problem. I would include myself in that and it has caused me to reflect on my own attitude towards certain parts of society.

    I have to agree on what you say. Sadly, the chattering classes often blame the 'victim'.

    The abusers were not all Asians - that has been 'forgotten' in all of the 'fury'.
    White males are just as capable of raping vulnerable children as are males from other ethnic backgrounds if those children are not protected from abuse.
    These children were placed in 'care' for their protection not to be injected with heroin and raped and passed around the community.
  • edited 15 January 2020 at 1:59PM
    CornucopiaCornucopia Forumite
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    edited 15 January 2020 at 1:59PM
    choille wrote: »
    So, you are saying, repeating the media myth that is was because of race that the social services allowed these girls to be raped? That police dropped the investigation?
    That is nonsense.

    I said it was a factor - by which I mean that it is widely reported.

    I'm still unclear as to what you think the factors are?
    ex Board Guide

  • Out,_Vile_JellyOut,_Vile_Jelly Forumite
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    There are two issues:


    -the clear vulnerability of young people in the care system


    -ethnic factors amongst organised perpetrators (in terms of their community's eagerness to excuse/cover up behaviour, and reluctance from the authorities to ask difficult questions)


    Neither should be ignored.
    They are an EYESORES!!!!
  • michaelsmichaels Forumite
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    There are two issues:


    -the clear vulnerability of young people in the care system


    -ethnic factors amongst organised perpetrators (in terms of their community's eagerness to excuse/cover up behaviour, and reluctance from the authorities to ask difficult questions)


    Neither should be ignored.

    I think it would be harder to organise this form of abuse in other communities as there are fewer who would be willing to accept this behaviour amongst their peers rather than reporting it to the authorities.

    Whilst it is clearly children who were being abused, how does one protect a 15 year old who insists they are making their own choices and could only be prevented from doing so by physically locking them up?
    I think....
  • choillechoille Forumite
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    It was being reported to the authorities.
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