New Post Advanced Search
Important update! We have recently reviewed and updated our Forum Rules and FAQs. Please take the time to familiarise yourself with the latest version.

Money Savers Arms


Last ooorders!… We’re sorry but for now, due to resources, we need to close the Money Savers Arms including Discussion Time.

It’s not easy to write this. We love the forum, but we also have a job to do to protect it, our users and MoneySavingExpert, and at the moment, with all our resources focused on Coronavirus information, and all the team at home, we don’t feel we have the resources to do a good enough job.

For four months, we’ve been struggling to cope with the huge volumes of messages we’ve been getting from Forumites – many of whom are in desperate and dire straits with their finances. The team have been working all hours to try and keep on top of it. At first we thought it’d be a short sharp spike, but it isn’t, it’s continuing, so we have had some difficult choices to make about prioritisation.

Unfortunately in, and likely because of, these stressful times, the Forum team have also been receiving an increasing number of complaints about posts made on the Money Savers Arms and Discussion Time. The team have done what they can to try and walk the tightrope of balancing all the various interests, but for now we need to draw a line under this and temporarily close this Board, so we can keep the key, MoneySaving boards – where people are supporting each other through this crisis - running smoothly.

We know this board is important to you, but as the MSE stance has been forbearance throughout this crisis, now we ask that of you. We’re sorry. Of course you can post on other boards, but we’d ask you to stick to the subjects of those boards, and not use them as a surrogate Money Savers Arms or Discussion Time. And as always please be kind and friendly to each other, especially any newbies.

Thanks
MSE Forum Team

Utter madness

edited 14 January at 5:29PM in Discussion Time
90 replies 1.1K views
1246789

Replies

  • Biggus_DickusBiggus_Dickus Forumite
    1.2K posts
    1,000 Posts Second Anniversary Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭
    Nick_C wrote: »
    Standardised batteries that can readily be replaced would be great!
    All mobiles should be ‘wind-up’,...no batteries required,...just like Trevor Bayliss’ wind-up radio.


  • peter_the_piperpeter_the_piper Forumite
    30K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    I've had a few wind up torches and radio's, on the face of it a good idea except the winding handle keeps breaking and you can't get replacements or repair them.
    I'd rather be an Optimist and be proved wrong than a Pessimist and be proved right.
  • spadooshspadoosh Forumite
    8.7K posts
    Ninth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭
    The problem with standardising anything is that it becomes very difficult to move away from.

    If a charging standard was introduced when phones came out we would all still be using the original nokia phone charger and the subsequent limitations that gives, not only on the charge side of things but limiting the ability of phones too.

    Think of train tracks and our inability to move to high speed trains. Or think of how difficult it is to remove the UK from the EU.

    If everybody looked the same, wed get tired of looking at each other. This is the very problem with the EU, its tolerant and actively encourages stagnation discouraging competition and progress.
  • spadooshspadoosh Forumite
    8.7K posts
    Ninth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭
    Carrot007 wrote: »
    We can but hope for such a beneficial option.


    One of the main issues currently is you cannot.
    Nick_C wrote: »
    Standardised batteries that can readily be replaced would be great!

    I assume you both use the nokia 3310? The phone with removeable battery that you can easily replace? Or do you actually like the benefits of a built in battery and the subsequent design and sizing benefits it offers for smart phones?
  • JackmydadJackmydad Forumite
    9.2K posts
    Seventh Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭
    spadoosh wrote: »
    The problem with standardising anything is that it becomes very difficult to move away from.

    If a charging standard was introduced when phones came out we would all still be using the original nokia phone charger and the subsequent limitations that gives, not only on the charge side of things but limiting the ability of phones too.

    Think of train tracks and our inability to move to high speed trains. Or think of how difficult it is to remove the UK from the EU.

    If everybody looked the same, wed get tired of looking at each other. This is the very problem with the EU, its tolerant and actively encourages stagnation discouraging competition and progress.

    I agree, and it shows why governments shouldn't get involved in anything that's non-political.
    Plenty of things manage to be standardised just for common sense reasons. Screw threads are largely standard for instance, they're set by various standards bodies, but not directly or unilaterally by government (AFAIK at least)

    They seem to manage to change the standard when needed, with that and with various other things.

    It needs a common sense approach.

    Unfortunately real world common sense, and government of any sort, don't usually go hand in hand.
  • Important update! We have recently reviewed and updated our Forum Rules and FAQs. Please take the time to familiarise yourself with the latest version.
  • HerzlosHerzlos Forumite
    12.1K posts
    Ninth Anniversary 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Because if you don't regulate, you get companies using non-standard stuff and forcing customers to pay huge sums for locked-down products. Like the iPhone chargers until the EU made them provide a USB adapter. Most of this stuff seems pretty common sense and works out well for the end consumers.




    So what happens when you buy your first mobile phone?


    You pay £4 for a charger. It's not that hard or expensive.


    It makes sense, they'd already insisted on standardized chargers and my last 5 or 6 phones have been micro-USB and I've got a pile of spare chargers. I don't agree with narrowing it down to a particular standard (such as USB-B or USB-C), but if we're keen to cut down on waste (and cost) then dropping the free charger (which you're paying for anyway) is a no brainer.
  • spadooshspadoosh Forumite
    8.7K posts
    Ninth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭
    Herzlos wrote: »
    You pay £4 for a charger. It's not that hard or expensive.


    It makes sense, they'd already insisted on standardized chargers and my last 5 or 6 phones have been micro-USB and I've got a pile of spare chargers. I don't agree with narrowing it down to a particular standard (such as USB-B or USB-C), but if we're keen to cut down on waste (and cost) then dropping the free charger (which you're paying for anyway) is a no brainer.

    This argument is flawed. It works with the status quo but doesnt when it comes to progress.

    Look at something like light bulbs. We went from incandescent to energy efficient to led. Loads of people got on board the energy efficent bulb bandwagon, millions made and produced, for the next invention in the way of leds to take over.

    Now assume we introduced standardisation with energy efficent bulbs, wed have millions of millions of them which would essentially be obsolete when the led came about. This would lead to increased waste, as youve made a product that will not be used, and youve made far more than you would have ever needed to consider because it became standard. And once it became standard, the incentive to move to LED would be less due to costs. So youre then making a less efficient, more wasteful product simply because its a standard.
  • edited 15 January at 11:46AM
    spadooshspadoosh Forumite
    8.7K posts
    Ninth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭
    edited 15 January at 11:46AM
    Think of our house wiring.

    The increase in prevalence of the likes of electric cars is giving rise to the introduction of 3 phase in the UK. The standard was (not legal standard but industry standard) single phase. No we all want electric vehicles were thinking it mightve been better going with the 3 phase option, issue is its expensive to retrofit, so we have to find work arounds in the form of less efficient other things.

    Ill be honest, i dont know much about 3 phase electrics so could be completely off with this as an analogy. :o


    Or cars in gneral. We standardised the engines, petrol or diesel. Tell me how good that standardisation is working for us right now? Trust me, you really dont want this. this is everything you fight against, its just being sold to you in a way that youd buy in to.
  • JackmydadJackmydad Forumite
    9.2K posts
    Seventh Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭
    Single phase has been used because it can carry enough power for most domestic premises. Usually three phase is already in the area, but the individual phases are taken to different houses or groups of houses.
    So getting 3 phase into a domestic property might be fairly simple, or can be very complicated.
    I've worked on at least one house installing 3 phase, and on others that already had it.

    What is the real problem I reckon is that the infrastructure as it is just won't deal with mass car charging. It's going to need bigger transformers and associated switch gear, and bigger conductor sizes just to get the power into an area, let alone once they start distribution.
    Even at the domestic end, 3 phase gear is mostly small industrial stuff. Expensive.

    The problem with electricity distribution is that you have to have standards. Before WWII in this country there was a mish mash of local power generation. AC and DC at various voltages. There was no way it could be standardised to make the "National Grid" and so a lot of the small stations went.

    But in general some things have to be standardised, some things don't. I don't see why saying that standard charging ports for phones, or having easily swappable "standard" batteries would hold development back much.
  • NBLondonNBLondon Forumite
    3.8K posts
    Ninth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭
    spadoosh wrote: »
    Now assume we introduced standardisation with energy efficent bulbs, wed have millions of millions of them which would essentially be obsolete when the led came about.
    You mean like the 4 key types of fitting - Bayonet, Edison Screw and the small versions thereof? As opposed to some IKEA lamps which are built to (Swedish?) standards and only fit the IKEA bulbs (and vice versa). It's been a pain for some people who went to halogen for built-in lighting and it's a minor pain for me that I have to keep about a dozen spare bulbs in a cupboard to have one for every light fitting in the house... but I can still put a bayonet fitting LED bulb in the hallway light where an incandescent was 25 years ago.
    Wash your Knobs and Knockers... Keep the Postie safe!
Sign In or Register to comment.

Quick links

Essential Money | Who & Where are you? | Work & Benefits | Household and travel | Shopping & Freebies | About MSE | The MoneySavers Arms | Covid-19 & Coronavirus Support