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    • LittleVoice
    • By LittleVoice 23rd Jan 08, 6:26 PM
    • 8,408 Posts
    • 5,979 Thanks
    LittleVoice
    • #2
    • 23rd Jan 08, 6:26 PM
    • #2
    • 23rd Jan 08, 6:26 PM
    Your payslip must show you what you have been paid gross (and how it has been calculated if it is not a standard amount every time). The deductions which lead to the nett amount should be shown too. You don't need to work it out from the amount you have received - get a proper payslip from your employer.
  • aardvarkuk
    • #3
    • 23rd Jan 08, 6:31 PM
    • #3
    • 23rd Jan 08, 6:31 PM
    Your payslip must show you what you have been paid gross (and how it has been calculated if it is not a standard amount every time). The deductions which lead to the nett amount should be shown too. You don't need to work it out from the amount you have received - get a proper payslip from your employer.
    Originally posted by LittleVoice
    Your assuming a lot are you not

    I have got a proper wage slip.

    I would like to do deductions myself.

    I also know how a wage slip is already calculated.

    And I just wanted some help to do it myself. :rolleyes:
  • tigtag02
    • #4
    • 23rd Jan 08, 7:32 PM
    • #4
    • 23rd Jan 08, 7:32 PM
    Your assuming a lot are you not

    I have got a proper wage slip.

    I would like to do deductions myself.

    I also know how a wage slip is already calculated.

    And I just wanted some help to do it myself. :rolleyes:
    Originally posted by aardvarkuk
    But thats not what you asked is it?

    What exactly is LV assuming :confused:

    If all the info is on your payslip then why do you need to work backwards :confused:

    I'm not aware of any program that would enable you to work backwards whilst also taking into consideration your tax code.

    There are many to work out the correct deductions.
    Last edited by tigtag02; 23-01-2008 at 7:38 PM.
    baby no3 due 16th November
    TEAM YELLOW
    DFD 16/6/10
    "Shut your gob! Or I'll come round your houses and stamp on all your toys" The ONE, the ONLY, the LEGENDARY Gene Hunt
  • aardvarkuk
    • #5
    • 23rd Jan 08, 8:58 PM
    • #5
    • 23rd Jan 08, 8:58 PM
    But thats not what you asked is it?

    What exactly is LV assuming :confused:

    If all the info is on your payslip then why do you need to work backwards :confused:

    I'm not aware of any program :rolleyes: that would enable you to work backwards whilst also taking into consideration your tax code.

    There are many to work out the correct deductions.
    Originally posted by tigtag02
    why post if you cant help

    I WANT TO DO THE CALCULATIONS MYSELF IS THAT SUCH A BAD THING.

    :rolleyes:

    Some people, jeez.
  • tigtag02
    • #6
    • 23rd Jan 08, 9:06 PM
    • #6
    • 23rd Jan 08, 9:06 PM
    why post if you cant help

    I WANT TO DO THE CALCULATIONS MYSELF IS THAT SUCH A BAD THING.

    :rolleyes:

    Some people, jeez.
    Originally posted by aardvarkuk
    NO ~ IT'S NOT.

    BUT, you dont need to claculate net to gross!! Gross to net will work perfectly fine!
    baby no3 due 16th November
    TEAM YELLOW
    DFD 16/6/10
    "Shut your gob! Or I'll come round your houses and stamp on all your toys" The ONE, the ONLY, the LEGENDARY Gene Hunt
    • CharleneUK
    • By CharleneUK 23rd Jan 08, 9:15 PM
    • 3,165 Posts
    • 1,099 Thanks
    CharleneUK
    • #7
    • 23rd Jan 08, 9:15 PM
    • #7
    • 23rd Jan 08, 9:15 PM
    I go to I-resign and it produces a clear breakdown.

    http://i-resign.com/uk/financialcentre/tax_calculator.asp
    Last edited by CharleneUK; 23-01-2008 at 10:29 PM.
    "I did then, what I knew then. And when I knew better, I did better"

    Timberlake Hussy Clique Member No 2
  • mrkbrrws
    • #8
    • 24th Jan 08, 8:34 PM
    • #8
    • 24th Jan 08, 8:34 PM
    It could be worked backwards in a spreadsheet or if someone wrote a program/web application to do it - but I don't actually know of one either apart from an actual payroll program (like Sage Payroll) which often have a net payments function.

    However, if you are only calculating in the basic rate band this could help:-

    1.) Work out the difference between your actual net pay from a payslip and the net pay figure you want to calculate from.

    2.) Divide the answer by 0.67.

    3.) Add or subtract that as appropriate to/from the gross pay on the payslip you used in Step 1.

    N.B. This will only work if all your figures stay in the basic rate band and 11% NIC band. If you know all the figures are over the higher rate threshold, you can use 0.59 in Step 2 instead.

    If I've confused you then an easier solution might be to use a net pay calculator like www.listentotaxman.com to trial and error gross pay figures until you get an approximate answer.
    • CLAPTON
    • By CLAPTON 24th Jan 08, 11:12 PM
    • 39,881 Posts
    • 28,478 Thanks
    CLAPTON
    • #9
    • 24th Jan 08, 11:12 PM
    • #9
    • 24th Jan 08, 11:12 PM
    if G= gross
    then
    net income =
    G-(G-5225-2230)x.22-223-(G-435)x.11

    so just solve the equation for G

    of course I'm assumimg you have no pension contributions and you are contracted in for SP2 and you earn more than 7455 and less than 39825 and have no benefits in kind or owe no back tax and are not above pension age.
  • MoKa
    I know this is an old thread, but I thought I'd add another reason why you MIGHT want to calculate gross to net.

    I am currently calculating my household outgoings now versus what they will be once we complete a planned reduction in household costs. To put this into perspective, I want to work out how much better off i'd be, and liken it to the equivalent pay increase I would require to get the same benefit. Obviously the amount I save will be a net amount, after deductions, etc, so in order to see the true value of the savings as an equivalent 'pay rise', I need to gross it up.

    As an example, with nice simple (and not at all realistic figures):

    If I were earning £20/hour and my potential saving in the cost saving exercise was £100 per week, I wouldn't just have to work 5 hours to earn that £100, as that would be how much I would get AFTER tax. Using the link that was posted above (and manipulating the salary amount to work it backwards), I've worked out that £100 grossed up would actually be £146, which is actually more than 7 and a half hours extra to earn that £100 net.

    So, the benefit of working out a net to gross figure is that I can see I would have to work 50% more time (7.5, not 5 hours) to earn the same amount of net pay after tax.
    • CLAPTON
    • By CLAPTON 23rd Aug 09, 2:24 PM
    • 39,881 Posts
    • 28,478 Thanks
    CLAPTON
    groosing up for MARGINAL earnings is different from grossing up for total earnings and very straight forward
    • Ballymackeonan
    • By Ballymackeonan 23rd Aug 09, 7:10 PM
    • 591 Posts
    • 1,356 Thanks
    Ballymackeonan
    I use a program called Calcpay for wages and it will do calculations from net to gross. You can download it as a test program for 3 pay periods, so you would be able to do a check using it.
  • Pumpkinface
    I know this is an old thread, but I thought I'd add another reason why you MIGHT want to calculate gross to net.

    I am currently calculating my household outgoings now versus what they will be once we complete a planned reduction in household costs. To put this into perspective, I want to work out how much better off i'd be, and liken it to the equivalent pay increase I would require to get the same benefit. Obviously the amount I save will be a net amount, after deductions, etc, so in order to see the true value of the savings as an equivalent 'pay rise', I need to gross it up.

    As an example, with nice simple (and not at all realistic figures):

    If I were earning £20/hour and my potential saving in the cost saving exercise was £100 per week, I wouldn't just have to work 5 hours to earn that £100, as that would be how much I would get AFTER tax. Using the link that was posted above (and manipulating the salary amount to work it backwards), I've worked out that £100 grossed up would actually be £146, which is actually more than 7 and a half hours extra to earn that £100 net.

    So, the benefit of working out a net to gross figure is that I can see I would have to work 50% more time (7.5, not 5 hours) to earn the same amount of net pay after tax.
    Originally posted by MoKa
    It's far easier.

    To bring home an additional £100 you would need to earn £125 if a 20% tax payer or £166.66 if you are a 40% tax payer.

    125 x 80% = 100 and
    166.66 x 60% = 100

    I cannot imagine how you came up with £146 as I don't see a link. Perhaps you are right on the edge of the tax band. :confused:

    (I have not considered NI but it would be just as straightforward)
    Last edited by Pumpkinface; 24-08-2009 at 8:35 AM.
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