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  • FIRST POST
    • NathanMorgan
    • By NathanMorgan 24th Feb 16, 9:26 PM
    • 118Posts
    • 12Thanks
    NathanMorgan
    Mobile Personal Trainer
    • #1
    • 24th Feb 16, 9:26 PM
    Mobile Personal Trainer 24th Feb 16 at 9:26 PM
    im considering a career in becoming a personal trainer but I'd be a mobile personal trainer where I'll travel to the clients homes and train them there as I've come across a few people who are either too shy to join a gym or don't have the time commitments in travelling to and from the gym.

    I have researched my local area and there is no one currently doing this sort of service to their clients. The benefit I can see from this type of service is not being tied down in paying expensive gym rent and the downside is travelling expenses and the inevitable cancellations.

    I have all the equipment needed for the job it's just doing my level 3 qualification now.

    Do any of you fellow PT's offer the same service, if so, what have you found to be the pro's and con's of it?
Page 1
    • NathanMorgan
    • By NathanMorgan 25th Feb 16, 5:51 PM
    • 118 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    NathanMorgan
    • #2
    • 25th Feb 16, 5:51 PM
    • #2
    • 25th Feb 16, 5:51 PM
    BUMP for some feedback.
    • andygb
    • By andygb 25th Feb 16, 6:19 PM
    • 11,672 Posts
    • 25,097 Thanks
    andygb
    • #3
    • 25th Feb 16, 6:19 PM
    • #3
    • 25th Feb 16, 6:19 PM
    BUMP for some feedback.
    Originally posted by NathanMorgan
    I am doing level 2 at the moment Nathan, and I think that you should go for it, because there is obviously a market for people who would like fitness training at home.
    If you are interested in this, then contact your local Chamber of Commerce and they will be able to give you advice regarding your business idea, creating a business plan and networking with other local businesses, as well as sound advice regarding marketing.
    Good luck!
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 25th Feb 16, 6:31 PM
    • 9,623 Posts
    • 7,615 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    • #4
    • 25th Feb 16, 6:31 PM
    • #4
    • 25th Feb 16, 6:31 PM
    A friend has been doing this for over 20 years
    • NathanMorgan
    • By NathanMorgan 25th Feb 16, 7:25 PM
    • 118 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    NathanMorgan
    • #5
    • 25th Feb 16, 7:25 PM
    • #5
    • 25th Feb 16, 7:25 PM
    I am doing level 2 at the moment Nathan, and I think that you should go for it, because there is obviously a market for people who would like fitness training at home.
    If you are interested in this, then contact your local Chamber of Commerce and they will be able to give you advice regarding your business idea, creating a business plan and networking with other local businesses, as well as sound advice regarding marketing.
    Good luck!
    Originally posted by andygb
    I forgot to mention that I've got my level 2 certificate in gym instructing and I've been debating for a while in doing my level 3 but from researching the current market I've found not alot of PT's in my area are training their clients in their homes so I'm going to give it a shot.
    • NathanMorgan
    • By NathanMorgan 25th Feb 16, 7:25 PM
    • 118 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    NathanMorgan
    • #6
    • 25th Feb 16, 7:25 PM
    • #6
    • 25th Feb 16, 7:25 PM
    A friend has been doing this for over 20 years
    Originally posted by lincroft1710
    how is he finding it?
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 25th Feb 16, 8:55 PM
    • 9,623 Posts
    • 7,615 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    • #7
    • 25th Feb 16, 8:55 PM
    • #7
    • 25th Feb 16, 8:55 PM
    Based in London (one of the better parts) Has a regular clientele but also takes classes in gyms and does diversify. Often works 6 day week. The clientele has been built up over a long time. Don't know how lucrative it is though
    • lovehackney
    • By lovehackney 26th Feb 16, 11:48 AM
    • 142 Posts
    • 149 Thanks
    lovehackney
    • #8
    • 26th Feb 16, 11:48 AM
    • #8
    • 26th Feb 16, 11:48 AM
    I'm not a personal trainer BUT I do have a personal trainer who come to my house each week. From what I can tell, and what he says, the main pros and cons are:

    Pros:
    - flexibility over training times - you don't need to wait for a gym to open, you can train whenever is convenient for you and your client
    - you get 100% of the money, no overhead to pay to the gym
    - more 'comfortable' environment (I find), for both client and trainer; client doesn't need to worry about being embarrassed, trainer will have client's full attention and can have a cup of coffee if they wish!
    - clients might be less likely to cancel - it's easier to not turn up to the gym, than not answer the door to someone at your house!!
    - as a client, i love training at home as it's easier for me, so is definitely something i look for in a trainer - I wouldn't switch to a gym based trainer

    Cons:
    - driving time between appointments - depends how far apart your clients are, but this 'non-earning' time so when setting your hourly rate, take this into account
    - you will probably need a car to lug all your equipment around, depending on what kind of training you do
    - client's house may be unsuitable for some exercises you have planned, e.g., i live in a flat so can't really jump up and down too much early in the morning.. once you have seen the room / garden though a good trainer should be able to adjust
    - traffic more likely to make you late
    - not sure about insurance requirements?

    For full info, I pay £40/hour (in London). Some people pay £60, £70 per hour.
    • lovehackney
    • By lovehackney 26th Feb 16, 11:49 AM
    • 142 Posts
    • 149 Thanks
    lovehackney
    • #9
    • 26th Feb 16, 11:49 AM
    • #9
    • 26th Feb 16, 11:49 AM
    I should add, similar to what Lincroft said, my trainer does also teach some classes at a couple of studios, and also works 6 (sometimes 7) days a week, as well as unsociable hours!
    • NathanMorgan
    • By NathanMorgan 26th Feb 16, 1:26 PM
    • 118 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    NathanMorgan
    I will be looking at setting up a website for my clients to book timeslots that suits them and myself as this sort of business is going to require alot of flexibility as I know some of my clients will be working during the day.

    I have all the equipment needed to go into clients homes such as adjustable dumbbells, squat stands, weight plates but the only piece of equipment that might be a problem is an olympic barbell which is 7ft long as I might not be able to get it in and out of houses as it's such an awkward piece and a barbell is fundamental for most beginner type training programs but I'd have to work around that issue by using an EZ bar instead or a shorter barbell.

    Also I know that marketing and advertising is going to play a huge role for this to be a success.
    • Caroline_a
    • By Caroline_a 27th Feb 16, 9:47 PM
    • 3,866 Posts
    • 10,647 Thanks
    Caroline_a
    I'd be really careful about doing olympic lifting in people's houses - unless you are going to invest in specialist mobile flooring!! I wouldn't want to be dropping the weights on my laminate!

    Also totally disagree that you need to use a barbell for beginner training sessions - it all depends on the client, age, etc etc. You can cover many of the olympic lifting moves using kettlebells or med balls.
    Last edited by Caroline_a; 27-02-2016 at 9:50 PM.
    • NathanMorgan
    • By NathanMorgan 28th Feb 16, 12:39 AM
    • 118 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    NathanMorgan
    I'd be really careful about doing olympic lifting in people's houses - unless you are going to invest in specialist mobile flooring!! I wouldn't want to be dropping the weights on my laminate!

    Also totally disagree that you need to use a barbell for beginner training sessions - it all depends on the client, age, etc etc. You can cover many of the olympic lifting moves using kettlebells or med balls.
    Originally posted by Caroline_a
    I wouldn't dream of allowing my clients to drop weight plates in their own houses without using rubber mats and bumper plates.

    I would of course take on board the clients needs and age but can you imagine the cost of having to buy all the weight incraments of kettlebells and med balls yet alone the amount of space all that equipment will take up whereas you can pick up a cheap barbell and weight plates for a fraction of the price of the equipment you've mentioned.

    Kettlebells and med balls only go up to a certain weight and even if you could buy 100kg+ kettlebells and med balls I wouldn't be happy to allow my clients to perform exercises using them as the risk of injury would be high such as getting the client to pickup a 100kg kettlebell and start squatting with it. It will be so much easier and safer in doing barbell squats from a stand in the correct position.

    Also it's easier to progress with barbell lifts as you can buy 0.5kg, 1.25kg weight plates etc so the client is less likely to plateau and will continue to break PR's.

    I'm after long term goals for my clients as progressive overload is the key training principle to apply in achieving results and if you believe that using kettlebells and med balls is the right way to go about it then im afraid you will be short changing yourself and your clients in believing so.
    • paulbennett
    • By paulbennett 7th Sep 17, 3:15 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    paulbennett
    I will be looking at setting up a website for my clients to book timeslots that suits them and myself as this sort of business is going to require alot of flexibility as I know some of my clients will be working during the day.

    I have all the equipment needed to go into clients homes such as adjustable dumbbells, squat stands, weight plates but the only piece of equipment that might be a problem is an olympic barbell which is 7ft long as I might not be able to get it in and out of houses as it's such an awkward piece and a barbell is fundamental for most beginner type training programs but I'd have to work around that issue by using an EZ bar instead or a shorter barbell.

    Also I know that marketing and advertising is going to play a huge role for this to be a success.
    Originally posted by NathanMorgan
    Seems like an excellent idea and than you can do promotion of your site via adwords, bing ads and facebook.
    • IAmWales
    • By IAmWales 7th Sep 17, 3:35 PM
    • 1,210 Posts
    • 2,567 Thanks
    IAmWales
    Original post is eighteen months old!
    • Manxman in exile
    • By Manxman in exile 8th Sep 17, 12:08 AM
    • 818 Posts
    • 535 Thanks
    Manxman in exile
    Original post is eighteen months old!
    Originally posted by IAmWales

    I was caught out by one of these "zombie" posts yesterday!


    Having said that, who would be trying Olympic lifts at home? The bar weighs 25kg on it's own and is about 7ft long.
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