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  • FIRST POST
    • Maddie
    • By Maddie 14th Oct 06, 6:32 PM
    • 853Posts
    • 1,111Thanks
    Maddie
    Whats the difference between a turnip and a swede?
    • #1
    • 14th Oct 06, 6:32 PM
    Whats the difference between a turnip and a swede? 14th Oct 06 at 6:32 PM
    I've recently found a great cheap organic food coop just round the corner, so it's time to get used to new veg which I haven't bought before.

    This week we got two of what I thought were swedes but my boyfriend said were turnips, I've done some searchs on google and can't work out the difference. :confused:

    I'm also going to have to get used to using loads of potatos, so will need to shift from rice & pasta based dishes to potato based. Have also toyed with idea of making soup for boyfriends packed lunches instead of him having to live on cheese and pickle sarnies.

    I'd never thought I'd get so much organic fruit & veg for just 6 a week!
Page 1
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 14th Oct 06, 6:46 PM
    • 9,089 Posts
    • 28,909 Thanks
    thriftlady
    • #2
    • 14th Oct 06, 6:46 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Oct 06, 6:46 PM
    Is the bf a Scot by any chance? I believe swedes are known as turnips or 'neeps in Scotland.

    To me, an Englishwoman a swede is quite a big beast- about the size of a baby's head. They are purply-orange on the outside and orange inside.Swedes are delicious boiled and mashed and served with lots of butter and black pepper.

    A turnip is much smaller and is purple at one end and white at the other. They are white inside.

    HTH
    • fatbelly
    • By fatbelly 14th Oct 06, 6:47 PM
    • 9,580 Posts
    • 7,169 Thanks
    fatbelly
    • #3
    • 14th Oct 06, 6:47 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Oct 06, 6:47 PM
    swede

    turnip

    swede turnip
    • Ruby Pudding
    • By Ruby Pudding 14th Oct 06, 6:48 PM
    • 888 Posts
    • 1,239 Thanks
    Ruby Pudding
    • #4
    • 14th Oct 06, 6:48 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Oct 06, 6:48 PM
    The difference is that I love swede but hate turnip

    Is that any help at all?
    • jaybee
    • By jaybee 14th Oct 06, 6:50 PM
    • 1,363 Posts
    • 2,433 Thanks
    jaybee
    • #5
    • 14th Oct 06, 6:50 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Oct 06, 6:50 PM
    fatbelly: brilliant!!!!!
    • SnowyOwl
    • By SnowyOwl 14th Oct 06, 6:58 PM
    • 5,098 Posts
    • 14,774 Thanks
    SnowyOwl
    • #6
    • 14th Oct 06, 6:58 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Oct 06, 6:58 PM
    Also in N.Ireland turnips are the big purple things with orange insides - and swedes are those other things as pictured by fatbelly. Google will be suitably confused too I bet. Thank you fatbelly for those pictures. Specially the one of poor Sven lol.

    The English supermarkets sometimes get turnips and swedes confused too here in N.Ireland - or rather they don't always label what we N.Irelanders know as turnip to be turnip. I wonder if they get the price confused too.

    The other one that caused me mega confusion was scallions - known as spring onion in England. I didn't know what spring onions were for a long time - I just thought the scallions were in the wrong place on the shelf, lol!

    Then there is aubergine and egg plant - the same thing, but egg plant is the name the Americans use.

    Zuccini = courgettes

    • Maddie
    • By Maddie 14th Oct 06, 7:31 PM
    • 853 Posts
    • 1,111 Thanks
    Maddie
    • #7
    • 14th Oct 06, 7:31 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Oct 06, 7:31 PM
    Thank you,

    I think I'm right then, always imagined turnips to be pale.

    My swede looks like fatbelly's first pic.
    • Caterina
    • By Caterina 14th Oct 06, 7:52 PM
    • 5,214 Posts
    • 34,680 Thanks
    Caterina
    • #8
    • 14th Oct 06, 7:52 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Oct 06, 7:52 PM
    A good way to make both turnips and swede taste MAGNIFICENT:

    Do not boil, but cube and sautee in a pan with olive oil, chopped garlic and shredded fresh chillies. Once cooked, sprinkle with freshly chopped flat leaf parsley. Enjoy!

    Caterina
    2016 NSDs so far: 2
  • aimeelister
    • #9
    • 14th Oct 06, 8:05 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Oct 06, 8:05 PM
    I cook my swede and make mash (as you would potato) and then add a grated carrot which has been steamed in the microwave. Makes the best mashed swede.
  • chardonnay
    turnips & swedes are the same vegetable. scots call them turnips. we carve turnips for halloween. think the picture called "turnip" just looks different due to the way the picture has been taken
    married to the man of my dreams! 9-08-09
  • CarolnMalky
    Turnips are things you put in stews etc...swedes come from sweden?
    If you obey all the rules...you miss all the fun!! Katherine Hepburn
    • Penny Watcher
    • By Penny Watcher 15th Oct 06, 9:06 AM
    • 3,412 Posts
    • 5,824 Thanks
    Penny Watcher
    I'm sooo confused
    As Wikipedia has the answer to all life's questions first I searched for 'turnip' - see below

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turnip

    Good result so far. Then I searched for 'swede'................

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swede


    What the flip!!! :confused:

    You cannot live as I have lived an not end up like me.

    Oi you lot - please GIVE BLOOD - you never know when you and yours might need it back! 52 pints so far.
  • julesgr
    turnip....white and purple

    swede ....purple and orangey yellow!

    turnip....bland

    swede....sweet and scrummy!
    Weight loss since 01/08/07 - 72 lbs
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 15th Oct 06, 9:22 AM
    • 9,089 Posts
    • 28,909 Thanks
    thriftlady
    As Wikipedia has the answer to all life's questions first I searched for 'turnip' - see below

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turnip

    Good result so far. Then I searched for 'swede'................

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swede


    What the flip!!! :confused:
    by Penny Watcher
    I think Wikipedia is American, and in America a swede is called a rutabaga !. Just to add to the confusion
  • Queenie
    Heheheheee, we had this discussion a while back, (blimey, almost a year ago!!) and I'm sure it will come up again at some point.

    Anyone interested, here's the previous discussion Turnip/Swede
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  • Queenie
    turnips & swedes are the same vegetable.
    by chardonnay
    Don't think you're right there, never been the same vegetable in our house. Clearly two different types.
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  • Edinburghlass
    Don't forget neeps
    Martin has asked me to tell you that I'm the Board Guide of the Telephones, Reclaim Bank Charges, Silver Savers and Scotland boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and I can move and merge threads there. Pease remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. Board guides don't deal with this. Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
  • Queenie
    ... Swedes are delicious boiled and mashed and served with lots of butter and black pepper...
    by thriftlady
    and a sprinkle of nutmeg please gotta have a sprinkling of nutmeg

    Use cubed swede along with others when you make a dish of roasted root veg, scrummy!

    E'lass - that's just a foreign name for one of the aforementioned
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    • saving-grace
    • By saving-grace 15th Oct 06, 9:48 AM
    • 292 Posts
    • 236 Thanks
    saving-grace
    I once had a (very polite ) disagreement at the checkout at Sainsbury's with the checkout operator and a supervisor. (I'm an Englishwoman living in Scotland). What they called a turnip, I called a swede. In the end because we couldn't agree they let me have it free!
    Afterwards I went back and checked the display -they were labelled as turnips! (but Fatbelly above confirms they were swedes!)
    • MegS
    • By MegS 15th Oct 06, 10:33 AM
    • 233 Posts
    • 135 Thanks
    MegS
    Another confused household here - my DH is from Sunderland and what I call a swede he calls a turnip and the other one pictured is a baby turnip apparently according to him anyway. Maybe Hadrian's Wall should have been built just north of York to include the north east in Scotland. Mind you there is a group in the north east trying to get the north east classed as its own country like Wales and Scotland.
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