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  • NatFeerick
    • #2
    • 21st Aug 13, 5:09 PM
    • #2
    • 21st Aug 13, 5:09 PM
    At the right price, none of the options are a real issue. Who cares who died there - get a priest in; high crime in the area - its a trend so do up the house & rent it then sell when conditions improve; even the subsidence - if you can buy at tear-down value, you can rebuild. Just about anything is fixable.
    Dedicated disciple of and Savvy MoneySaver
    Mortgage Free ahead of schedule November 2008!

    Calvin (to Hobbes) - "Sometimes the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere is that none of it has tried to contact us."
  • BobbinAlong
    • #3
    • 21st Aug 13, 7:17 PM
    • #3
    • 21st Aug 13, 7:17 PM
    Judging by the results to date most people would only avoid the ones that are a high insurance risk!
  • londonlydia
    • #4
    • 22nd Aug 13, 10:28 AM
    • #4
    • 22nd Aug 13, 10:28 AM
    Not sure I could live at the location of a serial killer's murders, you would never think there was a 'nice' feel about the place! And you'd end up sitting on your sofa watching telly and suddenly visualise a brutal killing in that same spot. Especially if you were watching a horror film, you'd never be able to sleep again!

    All the structural ones I'm less bothered about. At a significant discount, if you have the cash, there is usually solutions. Has anyone seen 'Help my house is falling down!'. In some ways, you'd feel safer knowing that you've got a fixed problem rather than not knowing and something happens down the line...
  • katyboo123
    • #5
    • 22nd Aug 13, 11:33 AM
    • #5
    • 22nd Aug 13, 11:33 AM
    I have scary images of our puppy digging up remains...

    No thank you to the serial killer / murder house. All others are fine, even if someone died there of natural causes
  • campfire08
    • #6
    • 22nd Aug 13, 2:19 PM
    • #6
    • 22nd Aug 13, 2:19 PM
    I used to walk past a serial killers house in Seattle, some would cross the road to pass by. These places usually have to be demolished, Jeeze imagine a creaking floorboard in the middle of the night.
    Then again might be a good way to make a buck. Put a plaque outside, install rattling chains and a few skeletons, tape a few moans and screams. Where is this house I think I want to buy it...
  • runaroundpauper
    • #7
    • 23rd Aug 13, 7:21 AM
    • #7
    • 23rd Aug 13, 7:21 AM
    Our current house ,the couple that 1st purchased the house back in the day both died in the house at different times of natural causes we know they still think they live here knocks at the door no one there figures at the window quiet whispering ,they where good honest people it doesn't bother us and we have been here 12 years but it has forced previous owners to sell quickly once they realised it not quite what they where looking for
  • Beetlemama
    • #8
    • 23rd Aug 13, 8:39 AM
    • #8
    • 23rd Aug 13, 8:39 AM
    I wouldn't buy anything I couldn't immediately move in to and live in, so no to subsidence and raging damp and flooding. No to the high crime too because I don't want to live worrying that I will be robbed. The rest I could suck it up for.
    "There is no substitute for time."

    Competition wins:
    2013. Three bottles of oxygen! And a family ticket to intech science centre. 2011. The Lake District Cheese Co Cow and bunny pop up play tent, cheese voucher, beach ball and cuddly toy cow and bunny and a £20 ToysRus voucher!
    • Gettingtherequickly
    • By Gettingtherequickly 23rd Aug 13, 8:52 AM
    • 2,476 Posts
    • 10,280 Thanks
    • #9
    • 23rd Aug 13, 8:52 AM
    • #9
    • 23rd Aug 13, 8:52 AM
    Having had to go to a property where someone had been murdered, the place had yet to be cleared out, although forensics had cleaned up their bit, the only thing that concerned me was going into the room where the victim had been found and imagining their fear, especially as it transpired they need not have died. Other than that, it is only walls, it is what you make of it afterwards that counts.
    Did my LBM in reverseFinally debt free with money in the bank!

    I know I am getting old, but there is no need for my consultant to age me by another 10 years 😉
  • chunkychocky
    Where I lived as a teenager there was a murderer who BBQd his wife and then buried her under the patio. That house was left empty for a few years and had graffiti painted on it and windows smashed on a regular basis. Eventually the neighbours in the other half of the semi-detached house bought it and knocked through. They got it for something like £10k when it should have been more like £100k. Once they bought it people stopped damaging it. It was not the sort of neighbourhood that generally suffered from vandalism.
  • quidsy
    I had this situation 10 years ago, someone owned a house where his tenant, her grown son & the dog were murdered by a mental ex bf.

    After the police had done with it he wanted to sell so I asked to view as we were looking and he was selling for a low price for the area (plumstead)

    it might have been different if it was done up but it still had the blood stains & large chunks of carpet removed where the killer had dragged the bodies upstairs & as soon as we walked it, it just had a "nasty" vibe. I tried to loo beyond butI just couldn't, the idea of sleeping in the same bedroom where he killed the mum was too much to think about.

    Iit eventually did sell after being done up but I am not sure if the EA ever told the buyers about the history or if they knew already.
    I don't respond to stupid so that's why I am ignoring you.

    2015 £2 saver #188 = £45
    • sweetme
    • By sweetme 23rd Aug 13, 11:07 AM
    • 13,322 Posts
    • 46,221 Thanks
    I did. The last house I lived in was previously occupied by a notorious couple. Well known for their very passionate arguments. After one argument she, literally, battered him to death with a baseball bat, left him upstairs in the bedroom and went downstairs and carried on drinking with her mates. It was two/three days later that it was discovered he was dead. She did time but as far as I am aware she is out now. It didn't really phase me as such but when I stripped my boys room for decorating there was a lot of doodles/drawings of his on the walls, signed with his name. The only thing that did freak me a little was the dead dog I dug up when planting a tree. That's a smell I'll never forget.

    Seems I'm following a pattern with properties, the one I am in now, the previous occupant commuted suicide by jumping in front of a train.

    The guy in the first house has a book in print. Stories about poaching I think, I'll try find if there is a link for it.
    While I'm worth my room on this earth...
  • Widelats
    Yes, i was considering buying a house in Japan in the zone where they had the big incident, i believe it was a nuclear accident.
    Owed out = lots.
  • Mongrel
    If the only issues with the house were past events or physical issues that I can correct in time, then if the house is affordable/cheap AND in an area I want to live in it's a bargain. If it needs me to spend a year or three doing it up as/when I can afford to it's still a bargain, but then I understand that I have the luxury of being able to stay with family rent free.

    An area of high crime would deter me. I live in one of those areas now, I'd like to think if I buy a house I'll be improving my circumstances not swapping one iffy area for another. Having been broken into and frequently having to navigate the streets when aggressive and problematic people are trying to throw their weight around it's not an environment I want to buy a home in. I understand they fluctuate, but given that my area has been high crime for the 25 years I've lived here I'm not willing to take that particular gamble.
    I think the whole 'serial killer', 'murders', 'drug den' and 'known criminal' are all silly reasons not to buy a house.

    First of all, if it has been a drug den or known criminals have lived there - it doesn't make the slightest bit of difference. When you move in, it will be a new house. Anyone that had ties to that house before will consciously and subconsciously see this as a new household, too - so it doesn't change your likelihood of people coming and asking for drugs or anything like that.

    Also, if someone died there or whatever - that was a thing of the past, and it doesn't make you more likely to get murdered yourself or anything like that. If you think 'it has a nasty vibe' etc, that's purely psychological - you may feel this, but I would be able to live in the same house and never feel that negativity. But I still get what you meant by this.

    The thought of someone having been murdered there would give me more motivation to live on and succeed in life, to do even more good and to spread even more love.
  • Rotor
    Most pre-war houses will have had someone die in them ( not 'murdered' I'll grant you) becasue , before the NHS , most people died at home
  • Nicky101
    i dont know
    i think it would creep me out
    not wishing to be disrespectful
    it would be too sad
  • MrSmartprice
    Houses affected by subsidence or in flood risk areas would be a no-no at any price. But homes of criminals, or murder scenes wouldn't bother me at all, especially if there was a discount on offer.

    What would the problem be? They are bricks and mortar, ghosts do not exist and houses are not 'haunted'. It is all just a load of superstitious nonsense perpetrated for the simple-minded.

    Many years ago a house near my parents was the scene of a murder, a chap beat his wife to death with some sort of club. A crucial bit of evidence was the indentation of the club in the polystyrene tiles on the ceiling. (Remember them!) It wasn't a widely reported case as he pleaded guilty. The house was sold a year or so later and a new family moved in, as far as anyone knew none the wiser.
  • worried jim
    Here you go-Murderers house for sale right now-

    Haybarn Close, Littlethorpe, LE19 - £119,950,0,0,0,2038042,53330,00.htm

    This is the house that Colin Pitchfork lived in when he killed two girls in Leicestershire in the 1980's. Pitchfork raped and murdered two girls, the first in Narborough, Leicestershire, in November 1983, and the second in Enderby, also in Leicestershire, in July 1986.Colin was the first murderer in the world to be convicted using D.N.A. eveidence which was pionered at Leicester University.
    "Only two things are infinite-the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not so sure about the universe"
    Albert Einstein
    • DKLS
    • By DKLS 31st Aug 13, 4:20 PM
    • 11,656 Posts
    • 19,167 Thanks
    If the house fitted my needs I wouldnt hesitate to buy, I did buy a house where the previous owner hung himself in, I got that for a very good price due to that fact.
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