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  • FIRST POST
    Time to face the music
    Stepchange general questions
    • #1
    • 3rd Dec 12, 12:21 PM
    Stepchange general questions 3rd Dec 12 at 12:21 PM
    Id say that we find the majority of the time creditors are willing to stop or reduce interest. The biggest factor tends to be if they can see that there is a genuine debt problem and the payment being offered is reasonable. This doesnt guarantee a payment will be accepted but it certainly improves the chances.
    Originally posted by StepChange_James
    I'd say it depends on how close your DMP payment is to the minimum payment that makes the difference. If a creditor thinks you can afford the minimum payment, they think you can afford the interest too

    I actually find the comment about genuine debt problem and payment being offered as reasonable a tad offensive. We have a genuine debt problem and were able to make very reasonable payment offers but M&S did not consider we should have our interest stopped. Neither did NatWest. Or Lloyds TSB.

    Any idea on how to improve that James?
    Last edited by Time to face the music; 03-12-2012 at 12:24 PM.
    LBM 10/1/12 ~ DFW Start 6/2/12: 82,344 ~ Now Zero
    Debt free 17th April 2015
    Eternal thanks to the DMP & Mutual Support Thread and Payment a Day Thread
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    "Debt is normal. Be weird!" Dave Ramsey
    Proud to have dealt with our debt
Page 1
  • UpToMyNeckInIt
    • #2
    • 4th Dec 12, 11:09 PM
    • #2
    • 4th Dec 12, 11:09 PM
    Sorry to stir up the hornets nest, but in my opinion, based on my experience:

    The Myth:

    Stepchange is a free, independent charity.

    The Reality:

    They ain't independent: They are sponsored and funded by banks and other credit companies, (you will find this information buried in the very small print if you look hard enough on their website).

    That's who's interests they will look out for first and foremost. You will be railroaded into a DMP which maximises creditor return. Want to be in debt 10-15 Years? Go right ahead and go down this route.

    Fact:

    They use the 'mushroom' debt management model (ie: they keep you in the dark and feed you bull**** lol). Stepchange will (if you are self-employed and deemed eleigible for an IVA), refer you to Grant Thornton (one of those 'dreadful' private companies that they advise you not to approach in the first instance).

    Reality:

    My situation is: I have 40K personal debt, I own 2 properties and am self-employed. Stepchange (or CCCS as they were then), wanted me to sell my second property (my pension), releasing the 6k equity, and take out a 10-Year DMP, and making me 3k a year worse off in lost rent, telling me I would not be suitable for an IVA.

    Went with a well-regarded private firm in the end who wrangled it so that I could keep the rental property (me making a profit means greater return to creditors), so I was v. happy with that.

    My only minor beef is that I was charged a 70 admin fee + 1 Month's IVA payment for their services. Very good as they are, there are IPs that charge no upfront fees whatsoever. (That said, if the IVA writes off 20-23K of debt, what's 340?). Oh, and I'll be debt-free in 5-6 Years not 10-11 under a CCCS DMP.

    Something to consider don't you think?
    Last edited by UpToMyNeckInIt; 04-12-2012 at 11:22 PM.
  • ChopinonaBudget
    • #3
    • 5th Dec 12, 12:14 PM
    • #3
    • 5th Dec 12, 12:14 PM
    Actually, despite the confrontational nature of the post, it raises a very valid point, and one which stepchange might like to respond to..

    Stepchange, PayPal etc are free services, and excellent ones at that, but they are run by people, and people not computers make judgement calls. Do all three charities tend to give the same advice on the same situation? Or would it be prudent to advice people in difficulties to seek advice from more than one charity before making any formal agreements?
    And do each charity have a preferred method of repayment? I have heard that payload tend towards IVAs whilst stepchange tend towards DMP, so is that a myth that needs busting? Or is that actually a little bit true?
    I'm saying all of this with the greatest of respect to all of the charities' work, you all do a fantastic job. But there may be more than one way to skin a cat with some (all?) situations, and this might (should?) be addressed
    Last edited by ChopinonaBudget; 05-12-2012 at 4:11 PM. Reason: Phone edited PAYPLAN to both payload and PayPal.
    Overdraft 150 Smile PAID! Natwest 679 M&S 2,347 Halifax 2,665 Nationwide 5,579 Mum 5,390 Library Fines 21
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  • StepChange_James
    • #4
    • 5th Dec 12, 3:53 PM
    • #4
    • 5th Dec 12, 3:53 PM
    Hello,

    Were going a little off topic but Ill just clear up a few of the things from the above posts then well get back to the debt myths.

    StepChange Debt Charity is a registered charity (no. 1016630) we provide free and impartial advice on all available debt solutions. This includes IVAs, DROs, bankruptcy, equity release, administration orders, self-administered token payments as well as DMPs.

    Weve always been up front about how we are funded, there is a section on this page of our website: http://www.stepchange.org/Aboutus/Ourapproach.aspx which explains it all. We receive funding from the credit industry which allows us to provide a free service to everyone who needs us.

    Ive never worked for any of the other free debt advice organisations, but as a debt advisor for StepChange Debt Charity Ive always made sure that the advice I give suits the person's situation that Im speaking to. Sometimes there is more than one option which might be suitable and then its a matter of weighing up the pros and cons.

    Hopefully that clears things up, but if anyone would like to ask us any questions please go to the Ask a debt advisor a question thread rather than posting here.

    The next debt myth will be up shortly.

    Thanks

    James
    I work as a debt advisor for StepChange Debt Charity (formerly CCCS) and have specific permission from Martin to post on these boards to try and help those in debt. Read more information on StepChange Debt Charity in the Debt Problems: What to do and where to get help article. If you find you're struggling with debt and you need further help try our online advice facility Debt Remedy

    If money worries are keeping you awake, read Paul's success story at Need to Sleep

  • debtinfo
    • #5
    • 6th Dec 12, 7:45 AM
    • #5
    • 6th Dec 12, 7:45 AM
    The myth:

    Overspending is the main cause of debt problems #debtmyths

    The reality:

    It’s easy to think that people who get into financial difficulty have got there because they’ve been daft with their money, frittering their cash on handbags and plasma screen TVs.

    However the reality’s very different; the main causes of debt are job losses or pay cuts. We've an infographic that shows the difference between the perception and the reality: http://www.stepchange.org/infographi...x#.ULY1t4dg95o.

    Do you think people with debt problems are unfairly judged to be bad with money?
    Originally posted by StepChange_James

    Hi Stepchange, just wanted to add to this a little to this one. I have in the past worked as an examiner for the insolvency service part of which involves really getting to the root course of a persons bankruptcy through examination of their whole financial history. There are really 2 questions involved in the above "what caused the build up of debt in the first place" and "what caused the insolvency" which often get conflated together which is why the myth perpetuates. on the first case it is spending in excess of ones income that causes most people to be in debt and it is important that people realise that because if they dont they put themselves in a position to become insolvent if they have a change of circumstances, Whilst it is true that most people do not just continue spending until they go bankrupt by building up a large debt by overspending they leave themselves vunverable. There are many people out there right now who could be tipped over the edge by a small change in circumstances.

    The second question regerding why people actually go bankrupt is as you say often because of that life changing event, loss of job, marital split etc but people out there now need to look at their finances and ask themselves could that happen to me, is it wise for me to be spending more than my income now, what can i do to reduce my overall debt level even thogh i can manage the repayments at the moment because these tipping points often come without warning

    DI
    Hi, im Debtinfo, i am an ex insolvency examiner and over the years have personally dealt with thousands of bankruptcy cases.
    Please note that any views i put forth are not those of my former employer The Insolvency Service and do not constitute professional advice, you should always seek professional advice before entering insolvency proceedings.
  • Depth Charge
    • #6
    • 8th Dec 12, 12:09 AM
    • #6
    • 8th Dec 12, 12:09 AM
    The myth:

    A debt management plan usually takes 10 years or more to pay off #debtmyths

    The reality:

    Many people approaching us for advice on debt management worry that a debt management plan (DMP) will take forever to clear their debts. We’ve gone back over the stats for our clients who’ve completed their DMPs and found that the average plan took five years, two weeks and five days to pay off (about the same as an IVA).

    We’ve got an interesting blogpost if you’re curious about the difference between an IVA and a DMP.
    Originally posted by StepChange_James
    Hi James

    Interesting stats, but....

    Surely this would depend on the debtors circumstances and disposable income as to how long a debt management plan takes to conclude.

    Dont you have entry criteria for your debt management plans? so what happens to those that do not meet the criteria, surely your stats are false as you only count the ones you are prepared to take on - what happens to the rest and what percentage do they constitute?

    What is the current entry criteria for your debt management plans and what happens to those that have a change of circumstances who fall below the entry criteria?

    What happened to the token offer scheme you piloted, is it still operating?

    I hope you respect these questions as they are very fair in my book given your claims and they are coming from a very experienced non-profit agency face to face debt adviser who deals with issues like this everyday.
    Last edited by Depth Charge; 08-12-2012 at 12:20 AM.
  • alastairq
    • #7
    • 8th Dec 12, 10:36 AM
    • #7
    • 8th Dec 12, 10:36 AM
    Hi Stepchange, just wanted to add to this a little to this one........................................ Whilst it is true that most people do not just continue spending until they go bankrupt by building up a large debt by overspending they leave themselves vulnerable. There are many people out there right now who could be tipped over the edge by a small change in circumstances.
    I would like to add, quite often the original debt was relatively small....the oversized amounts which lead to a build-up, often come from excessive interest, and penalty charges.....some of which can seriously exceed the original amount of the debt.
    This contributes to the 'downward debt-cycle',until a point is reached where the debtor can no longer fund basic living expenses, without obtaining further credit to do so.
    Debt, in itself, moves from 'avoidable [& controllable]'....to 'unavoidable'..

    As individuals, we are no different to giant corporations....or businesses.

    We exist, financially, on a 'cash-flow' basis.

    Just like Rover, sometimes cash-flow hits a crisis.
    Sadly, few of us have the financial or business acumen of the high-flying CEO's of this world...but eve they go under!





    The second question regarding why people actually go bankrupt is as you say often because of that life changing event, loss of job, marital split etc but people out there now need to look at their finances and ask themselves could that happen to me, is it wise for me to be spending more than my income now, what can i do to reduce my overall debt level even though I can manage the repayments at the moment because these tipping points often come without warning

    DI
    I wholeheartedly agree with the above.....but...try and convince an 18 year old just starting work, that they should save for a pension, or a 'rainy day?'

    What sort of opinion of ourselves would we expect to receive, if when someone announces they are 'getting married'....and we respond , 'are you sure about this? Are you prepared for divorce, property settlements, etc?'......or..'are you aware there is a greater chance of being run over by a bus, than the marriage surviving, till death etc?'

    I've been married three times....[not all at once, though!]....each time, the last thing on my mind was, how long it would survive?

    I have, in the past, been [almost] made redundant from a State-run industry [that's privatisation for you]. I worked in a job where the consensus was, 'a-job-for-life'.....ie, job security.

    No such animal any more....

    I work in a job, where, 10-15 years ago, we were promised a guaranteed pay progression.....based on skills and experience.

    The skills and experience were undoubted..... the promised pay progression? Scotch mist! [that's the Civil Service for you!]

    Unfortunately, we cannot impart the required cynicism into the under-50's that allow for the para above from DI.


    After that, it's all about damage-limitation!
    No, I don't think all other drivers are idiots......but some are determined to change my mind.......
  • StepChange_James
    • #8
    • 10th Dec 12, 12:54 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Dec 12, 12:54 PM
    Hi James

    Interesting stats, but....

    Surely this would depend on the debtors circumstances and disposable income as to how long a debt management plan takes to conclude.

    Dont you have entry criteria for your debt management plans? so what happens to those that do not meet the criteria, surely your stats are false as you only count the ones you are prepared to take on - what happens to the rest and what percentage do they constitute?

    What is the current entry criteria for your debt management plans and what happens to those that have a change of circumstances who fall below the entry criteria?

    What happened to the token offer scheme you piloted, is it still operating?

    I hope you respect these questions as they are very fair in my book given your claims and they are coming from a very experienced non-profit agency face to face debt adviser who deals with issues like this everyday.
    Originally posted by Depth Charge
    Hi Depthcharge,

    We dont have entry criteria for Debt Management Plans, when we give debt advice we look at all the available options and recommend what we think suits that persons situation the best. Of the people who approach us for advice, less than 1 in 5 are suitable for a Debt Management Plan (DMP) and well support these people with whichever solution suits them best.

    If someones finances change after theyve had advice from us they can call us back up and well give them fresh advice based on their new situation. If a different solutions suits them better then well advise them on this.

    We arent currently operating a token payments scheme.

    Kind regards

    James
    I work as a debt advisor for StepChange Debt Charity (formerly CCCS) and have specific permission from Martin to post on these boards to try and help those in debt. Read more information on StepChange Debt Charity in the Debt Problems: What to do and where to get help article. If you find you're struggling with debt and you need further help try our online advice facility Debt Remedy

    If money worries are keeping you awake, read Paul's success story at Need to Sleep

  • Depth Charge
    • #9
    • 11th Dec 12, 12:00 AM
    • #9
    • 11th Dec 12, 12:00 AM
    Hi Depthcharge,

    We don’t have entry criteria for Debt Management Plans, when we give debt advice we look at all the available options and recommend what we think suits that persons situation the best. Of the people who approach us for advice, less than 1 in 5 are suitable for a Debt Management Plan (DMP) and we’ll support these people with whichever solution suits them best.

    If someone’s finances change after they’ve had advice from us they can call us back up and we’ll give them fresh advice based on their new situation. If a different solutions suits them better then we’ll advise them on this.

    We aren’t currently operating a token payments scheme.

    Kind regards

    James
    Originally posted by StepChange_James
    Hi James

    Thanks for the reply

    Could depend on your definition as suitable for a debt management plan I suppose.

    If someone has a monthly amount of disposable income that would take them 15 years to clear their debts would you take them on under your standard DMPs where payments are distributed to creditors etc or would you refer them to self help or elsewhere.

    Do you take people on in a debt management plan then irrespective of the level of their debts or their disposable income (including token offers) or how long the plan would take to conclude, hope you see my points given your previous claims.

    Im pretty sure I read in a parliamemtry report somewhere that the token offer scheme was going to be rolled out in the latter part of 2012, I could probably find the link if I looked.

    If I was to refer people to you for a debt management plan then I would need to know the above, I ask this as I was under the impression that 10 years was around the timescale that CCCS liked to adhere to and the minimum monthly disposable income figure was around the 100 mark.

    PS - It is likely that I will be meeting with one of the representitives from Stepchange in the not to distant future about issues such as the above for potential referral purposes etc so I will likely gain all the relevant information first hand.

    Maybe catch you later
    Last edited by Depth Charge; 11-12-2012 at 12:22 AM.
  • GD2
    But why would you need a minimum disposable income if you are asking a charity for help?

    That's the bit I've never understood or had satisfactorily explained.
  • Freshstart2012
    Hi

    I signed upto a DMP with StepChange a few years ago via National Debtline and I'm pretty sure that I had to have 100 a month surplus to be accepted.

    It's the best thing I ever did and only wish I would of known about the help available when I was much younger, rather than letting things get out of control.

    In my opinion research research research is the best way forward when you have a lot of debt. Knowing how to deal with creditors and not to be intimidated by them really helps, ie knowing your rights.
    Last edited by Freshstart2012; 11-12-2012 at 8:51 PM.
  • GD2
    Vitally important, that is absolutely true. Still doesn't explain why a charity that is funded directly by creditor contributions would turn away the very people that can be argued to need their help most though does it?

    Would be a bit like oxfam refusing to feed the hungriest in times of famine, and I can't see a reason why, other than a proportionate reduction in their income, it can be justified.
  • GD2
    As CCCS have taken the time to answer Depth Charge, why won't they answer another straightforward question? It isn't a particularly hard question to answer, i.e. as a charity why do you turn people away?

    Would be nice to have public clarification, even if only for newbies to the boards on here.
  • GD2
    Hi GD2

    We only recommend a debt management plan when its best advice for the clients own situation. We dont have any set criteria for affordability and we have no 100 threshold for DMPs.

    Its probably worth emailing us directly if you have any questions about our policies.

    Kind regards,

    Mat
    Originally posted by StepChange_Mat
    More than happy to accept what you have said re the 100 threshold, and apologies if I got it wrong. Haviing said that, I will say that that was information given to me by a CAB case worker who deal with referrals from CCCS when they cannot help and so therefore had no reason to doubt it. I would ask you to clarify, though, why you have indicated here that there is no minimum for your help, yet on another thread or question have also said that you do not operate a token payment scheme. This surely indicates that there IS some sort of threshold? Could you expand to what that is? To use my own example earlier, do you accept people with a disposable income of 50 on to a DMP (where best advice of course)? Could you give us any idea of what proportion of your DMP clients pay under 100?
  • lorraine_r
    Hi,

    Never posted on here but I feel I have to comment on this.

    Just so you know, I am a 46 year old (now) single mum with 3 kids. I found myself in trouble when my husband left. !!!!less bas***d left, went bankrupt and I haven't heard from him since, one piece of good news I suppose lol. Anyway, due to my job, even though I'm not a homeowner and have no assets I couldn't really go bankrupt, so I approached CCCS for help. That's what the forums say, that's what my employer at the time said. Being reasonably bright about financial statements, I had worked out my own disposable income to be around 200 ish on about 30,000 debt, most in joint names. What was it I said about being bright? Anyway, I spoke to CCCS fully expecting an IVA recommendation at around 200 per month. Let me tell you that my eyes were opened that day. Not only did they not bother discussing an IVA with me at all, they said it was BR or DMP, they then expected me to pay 300 per month on a DMP. No way could I afford that, but they didn't care, their attitude was pay as much as you can. They insisted I should knock both my childcare and petrol down, even though without enough to pay then I couldn't have worked anyway. Laughingly, they gave me the spiel about their plans being paid for by creditors, hinting that it didn't matter what I paid as it made no difference to them. I have since learned that they are paid a %, so the more you pay, the more they earn.

    Anyway, I approached a well known IP for an IVA, who was horrified by the way, and I entered into one at 180 per month. I kept all of this from everyone, until my brother found out. I can't say I found the IVA easy, but 180 was a hell of a lot better than the 300 that CCCS wanted. My brother, bless, funded a full and final settlement 2 and a half years in and I am now debt free.

    Anyway, all of this really is background to now. I work for a very large creditor (which is why I never wanted bankruptcy) who doesn't refer leads to CCCS and never will. My employers view them as sanitised debt collectors, who are a law unto themselves. I was given, this week, a copy of the latest Credit Today magazine, circulated primarily amongst the credit industry. I don't think you can buy it in the shops. The centre page spread is a huge advert for CCCS, boasting about how they are going to help many more people in debt. This is not going to come from ever more creditor referrals, but from massive advertising on TV, Press and internet. Where is this money coming from? Is it the millions in cash that they sit on perhaps? Let me quote a couple of lines from an advert that no ordinary man in the street/on the internet will ever see, as they will not dare publish it a newspaper,

    "For those in debt distress, that means a more caring and considered approach to their problems. For UK creditors, it means the best possible help and advice for your customers. And, importantly, more debt repaid."

    "With our debt management plans, all money repaid goes towards clearing the debt, None goes to us, Last year, we repaid over 312 Million to UK creditors. By referring customers to us, not the commercial sector, you're assured of better rates of debt recovery."

    "Call us now to find out more on **** *** ****. If you'd like to know more about how we can help your customers overcome debt problems, and manage their debt repayments, contact us now."

    This is an advert aimed solely at those creditors that do not refer directly. It blows away completely any lingering hint of impartiality that CCCS claim to have. They mention no ther solution than DMP, and are promising creditors a better return. Why? so they can earn more commission. It stinks. CCCS receive, I believe, around an 11% "dividend" or "donation" on what they collect. Meaning nigh on 3 Million per month in fees. Why on earth would they recommend anything other than DMP? And GD2 is right BTW, CCCS WILL turn you away, though they may say they won't. Search this whole forum for people who have written that they were refused help from CCCS, there are hundreds on here. Or, search for those that were advised DMP when it will take 10, 20, 30 years or more. Probably thousands.

    Mat, and the others, may believe what they are fed, but the reality is so much different. I have always said that actions speak much louder than words, and my advice to anyone would be to speak to Payplan, CAB, National Debtline. Anyone but CCCS.

    If you want to pay your creditors as much as you can then do it direct, don't let these money grabbers earn their commission. Maybe, as more people (and creditors who pass them 10,000 leads per week)are cottoning on to them, that is why they are going tobe directly advertising at,great expense,to replace the captured market monopoly that they have hitherto enjoyed. Maybe that is why this "debt myth" thread has appeared. The only debt myth here is that CCCS is impartial.
  • lorraine_r
    The reason I have posted again is that this is a thread about debt myths. Assumedly, for censorship, it can only be what CCCS decide? I don't personally think that is right, but I suppose most will disagree.

    James had no hesitation in attacking the competition CCCS faces from fee payers, is it right that no one has a right of reply? Is it right that you don't see the way they market themselves to creditors as working for creditors, whilst the myth on here perpetuates that they are impartial? Does it not at least deserve an explanation from CCCS, or will they ignore it?

    Make your own mind up, but I repeat that I work for a credit company, one of the few that isn't seduced.
  • UpToMyNeckInIt
    Hi,

    Never posted on here but I feel I have to comment on this.

    Just so you know, I am a 46 year old (now) single mum with 3 kids. I found myself in trouble when my husband left. !!!!less bas***d left, went bankrupt and I haven't heard from him since, one piece of good news I suppose lol. Anyway, due to my job, even though I'm not a homeowner and have no assets I couldn't really go bankrupt, so I approached CCCS for help. That's what the forums say, that's what my employer at the time said. Being reasonably bright about financial statements, I had worked out my own disposable income to be around 200 ish on about 30,000 debt, most in joint names. What was it I said about being bright? Anyway, I spoke to CCCS fully expecting an IVA recommendation at around 200 per month. Let me tell you that my eyes were opened that day. Not only did they not bother discussing an IVA with me at all, they said it was BR or DMP, they then expected me to pay 300 per month on a DMP. No way could I afford that, but they didn't care, their attitude was pay as much as you can. They insisted I should knock both my childcare and petrol down, even though without enough to pay then I couldn't have worked anyway. Laughingly, they gave me the spiel about their plans being paid for by creditors, hinting that it didn't matter what I paid as it made no difference to them. I have since learned that they are paid a %, so the more you pay, the more they earn.

    Anyway, I approached a well known IP for an IVA, who was horrified by the way, and I entered into one at 180 per month. I kept all of this from everyone, until my brother found out. I can't say I found the IVA easy, but 180 was a hell of a lot better than the 300 that CCCS wanted. My brother, bless, funded a full and final settlement 2 and a half years in and I am now debt free.

    Anyway, all of this really is background to now. I work for a very large creditor (which is why I never wanted bankruptcy) who doesn't refer leads to CCCS and never will. My employers view them as sanitised debt collectors, who are a law unto themselves. I was given, this week, a copy of the latest Credit Today magazine, circulated primarily amongst the credit industry. I don't think you can buy it in the shops. The centre page spread is a huge advert for CCCS, boasting about how they are going to help many more people in debt. This is not going to come from ever more creditor referrals, but from massive advertising on TV, Press and internet. Where is this money coming from? Is it the millions in cash that they sit on perhaps? Let me quote a couple of lines from an advert that no ordinary man in the street/on the internet will ever see, as they will not dare publish it a newspaper,

    "For those in debt distress, that means a more caring and considered approach to their problems. For UK creditors, it means the best possible help and advice for your customers. And, importantly, more debt repaid."

    "With our debt management plans, all money repaid goes towards clearing the debt, None goes to us, Last year, we repaid over 312 Million to UK creditors. By referring customers to us, not the commercial sector, you're assured of better rates of debt recovery."

    "Call us now to find out more on **** *** ****. If you'd like to know more about how we can help your customers overcome debt problems, and manage their debt repayments, contact us now."

    This is an advert aimed solely at those creditors that do not refer directly. It blows away completely any lingering hint of impartiality that CCCS claim to have. They mention no ther solution than DMP, and are promising creditors a better return. Why? so they can earn more commission. It stinks. CCCS receive, I believe, around an 11% "dividend" or "donation" on what they collect. Meaning nigh on 3 Million per month in fees. Why on earth would they recommend anything other than DMP? And GD2 is right BTW, CCCS WILL turn you away, though they may say they won't. Search this whole forum for people who have written that they were refused help from CCCS, there are hundreds on here. Or, search for those that were advised DMP when it will take 10, 20, 30 years or more. Probably thousands.

    Mat, and the others, may believe what they are fed, but the reality is so much different. I have always said that actions speak much louder than words, and my advice to anyone would be to speak to Payplan, CAB, National Debtline. Anyone but CCCS.

    If you want to pay your creditors as much as you can then do it direct, don't let these money grabbers earn their commission. Maybe, as more people (and creditors who pass them 10,000 leads per week)are cottoning on to them, that is why they are going tobe directly advertising at,great expense,to replace the captured market monopoly that they have hitherto enjoyed. Maybe that is why this "debt myth" thread has appeared. The only debt myth here is that CCCS is impartial.
    Originally posted by lorraine_r
    Hi Lorraine,

    Welcome to the forum.

    Truly excellent post, confirming my suspicions of CCCS. Sadly, I suspect any other creditor-funded 'charities' operate in a similar fashion.

    Like you say though, I am sure that many employees of such organisations truly believe they are giving impartial advice, but ultimately, they are plugging your information into a computer program, and if 'computer says no' then I suspect that's the advice you are given.
  • GD2
    As someone who is not shy of asking awkward questions which rarely seem to get get answered, I would just go on record to say that I feel that there is a world of difference between CAB, National Debtline and the CCCS. In my own opinion, 2 are there to help, 1 is there in an attempt to corner the market. 1 IP for 10,000 plus enquiries a week? Quite remarkable, even Melanie Giles has 2 and I doubt they have 10,000 enquiries in a year. What does that tell you? Nothing if you choose to ignore it, even less if you are happy to follow the flock.

    I would exclude Payplan here by the way as they are quite upfront that they are a business, but despite that still provide free (to client anyway) DMP's. What isn't to like about that? No smoke, no mirrors, just transparency. I have yet to see any debate on Payplans business practices, but I see many comments (mine included, accept that) that question CCCS, whether they like it or not.
  • Time to face the music
    As someone who is not shy of asking awkward questions which rarely seem to get get answered, I would just go on record to say that I feel that there is a world of difference between CAB, National Debtline and the CCCS. In my own opinion, 2 are there to help, 1 is there in an attempt to corner the market. 1 IP for 10,000 plus enquiries a week? Quite remarkable, even Melanie Giles has 2 and I doubt they have 10,000 enquiries in a year. What does that tell you? Nothing if you choose to ignore it, even less if you are happy to follow the flock.

    I would exclude Payplan here by the way as they are quite upfront that they are a business, but despite that still provide free (to client anyway) DMP's. What isn't to like about that? No smoke, no mirrors, just transparency. I have yet to see any debate on Payplans business practices, but I see many comments (mine included, accept that) that question CCCS, whether they like it or not.
    Originally posted by GD2
    When we selected a DMP provider, I didn't like the look of Payplan for several reasons:

    1) Too many posts here about people thinking they were close to the end of their DMP then suddenly finding they had thousands of pounds of interest added and years more to pay. Am not sure why but they all seemed to be Payplan clients.

    2) Selling of financial products such as insurance and PPI to DMP clients.

    3) Practice of suggesting clients stop paying creditors a few months before DMP ends and instead saving up for F&Fs. Why stir up a hornet's nest so close to the end.

    There were a few more but can't think of them right now and this post will probably be removed before anyone reads it
    LBM 10/1/12 ~ DFW Start 6/2/12: 82,344 ~ Now Zero
    Debt free 17th April 2015
    Eternal thanks to the DMP & Mutual Support Thread and Payment a Day Thread
    Mortgage free 3rd July 2014 - Grateful thanks to the 2013/14 MFW threads
    "Debt is normal. Be weird!" Dave Ramsey
    Proud to have dealt with our debt
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