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  • FIRST POST
    • Austin Allegro
    • By Austin Allegro 17th Mar 05, 3:59 PM
    • 1,431Posts
    • 4,005Thanks
    Austin Allegro
    How do you 'de-shine' a suit?
    • #1
    • 17th Mar 05, 3:59 PM
    How do you 'de-shine' a suit? 17th Mar 05 at 3:59 PM
    Normally we like shiney things but not when they're suits.

    I've got a nice navy blue wool suit that I've had about four years. It's starting to gleam a bit round the elbows and the trouser seat.

    The dry cleaner said he could 'retexturise' it (whatever that means) but thought it was too worn to make much difference.

    Does anyone have any old style remedies for this? I seem to recall reading in a wartime 'make do and mend' book that you could do it with light sandpapering, but I'd be worried I'd end up with my bum showing through!
Page 1
    • Pooky
    • By Pooky 17th Mar 05, 4:15 PM
    • 6,386 Posts
    • 37,824 Thanks
    Pooky
    • #2
    • 17th Mar 05, 4:15 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Mar 05, 4:15 PM
    I've got a nice belt sander if you wanna borrow it
    • maryb
    • By maryb 17th Mar 05, 9:24 PM
    • 2,553 Posts
    • 29,930 Thanks
    maryb
    • #3
    • 17th Mar 05, 9:24 PM
    • #3
    • 17th Mar 05, 9:24 PM
    I've read somewhere that sponging with vinegar and water takes the shine out temporarily but haven't tried it myself
    • Austin Allegro
    • By Austin Allegro 18th Mar 05, 9:30 AM
    • 1,431 Posts
    • 4,005 Thanks
    Austin Allegro
    • #4
    • 18th Mar 05, 9:30 AM
    • #4
    • 18th Mar 05, 9:30 AM
    MaryB, yes, I read that as well, and couldn't believe our old friend vinegar had yet another use! Will give that a try.

    And the belt sander sounds a good idea. Perhaps I could market a 'frugal belt' that has leather on one side, and sandpaper on the other. When your suit starts shining, you just whip it off and shimmy it up and down your legs to make your trousers good as new!
  • LionKing
    • #5
    • 27th Apr 06, 1:48 PM
    How do you take shine away from suit??
    • #5
    • 27th Apr 06, 1:48 PM
    Hi,

    I have dry cleaned my suit jacket a few times and there is now a shiny section just under the shoulder area.....(looks as if someone has ironed!).

    Is there anyway of getting rid of this as the rest of the suit is fine.

    Thanks!
    Filiss
  • aliasojo
    • #6
    • 5th May 06, 10:56 AM
    • #6
    • 5th May 06, 10:56 AM
    I'm not sure you can get rid of it now? I remember my Father (who always wore uniforms and suits) being a stickler for using a cloth whilst pressing so that this didn't happen......he always said that once the shine was there, it was too late.

    There's loads of clever peeps on here with good ideas though so I'll keep my fingers crossed that one of them can prove me wrong.
    Herman - MP for all!
    • calleyw
    • By calleyw 5th May 06, 3:40 PM
    • 7,906 Posts
    • 13,377 Thanks
    calleyw
    • #7
    • 5th May 06, 3:40 PM
    • #7
    • 5th May 06, 3:40 PM
    According to my household book of hints and tips it says for shiny patches that occur at elbow and knees due to wear is to sponge with a 1 tbsp (15ml) of ammonia diluted in 1/2 pint (250ml) of water.

    HTH

    Yours


    Calley
  • LionKing
    • #8
    • 19th May 06, 10:38 AM
    • #8
    • 19th May 06, 10:38 AM
    Thanks Calley. Would this method be ok for shine occurred by dry cleaning...not due to wear?
    Filiss
    • Lorian
    • By Lorian 15th Jul 06, 8:48 PM
    • 3,466 Posts
    • 1,686 Thanks
    Lorian
    • #9
    • 15th Jul 06, 8:48 PM
    • #9
    • 15th Jul 06, 8:48 PM
    If it's old enough to be shiny maybe it's old enough to look dated, and a new one is in order?
    • shopbot
    • By shopbot 15th Jul 06, 8:58 PM
    • 926 Posts
    • 373 Thanks
    shopbot
    In my experience when a suit goes shiny it is usually is made of polyester or has high polyester content. Wool tends to wear through rather than go shiny.

    I think that if it has got to the point where you have shiny patches it is time to retire it. This especially important if you are in a job where impressions count.

    I realise that you were referring to a suit jacket but on a related matter....
    The best way to extend the life of a suit is to buy two pairs of trousers. This is initially more expensive however will be cheaper in the long run. The quickest way to destroy a suit (or shoes for that matter) is to wear it continuosly day after day. If you can alternate suits so much the better. If you can only afford one suit definately get two pairs of trousers.

    • maryb
    • By maryb 15th Jul 06, 9:36 PM
    • 2,553 Posts
    • 29,930 Thanks
    maryb
    at the risk of sounding repetitive - try spnoging it with (what else?) vinegar and water
  • tawnyowls
    Steaming the suit using a wet cloth and a hot iron held close to, but not on the cloth, is also suggested as a remedy.
    • CGG
    • By CGG 16th Jul 08, 1:21 PM
    • 689 Posts
    • 667 Thanks
    CGG
    Ironed OH's suit - but the jacket's gone shiny!
    Oh dear Gawd, help me!
    OH bought a new suit 2 years ago for his father's funeral. It's not been worn since.
    We are going to an awards do tonight at DS's school, so need to look our best.
    Last night I got out OH's suit, but it had been squashed in the wardrobe, so I hung it in the bathroom believing the unwanted mass of creases would hang out in the steamy atmosphere.
    They didn't.
    I have steam ironed the trousers this morning. They have come up fine. But, and it's a big but, I did the same to the jacket, and now I've hung it up - it's gone shiny!
    Is there anything I can do?
  • arnie&caseysma!
    Try ironing it again but this time put a damp (not too wet) tea towel ontop first. This is what we used to do with our old uniform trousers even through boss used to tell us not to wet the tea towel but this made them shiny and I had to use a damp one to get rid.
    "Life may not always be the party you wish for, but whilst here you may aswell dance"!!!
    Murphy's NMPC Memb No 239!
    Dippychick's De-clutter club Member No 6! - onto room no 2!
    My Avatar? Arnie and Casey, proud parents to Storm and Tsu born 19/01/2009!!! - both now in new homes and called Murron and Burger!
    • Penelope Penguin
    • By Penelope Penguin 16th Jul 08, 1:28 PM
    • 16,978 Posts
    • 132,559 Thanks
    Penelope Penguin
    Hi there We have an existing thread on just this subject - I'll add this thread so that you can browse the other replies.

    Penny. x
    Life is too short to clean behind the fridge
  • CorvetteMan
    remove shine from suit
    Normally we like shiney things but not when they're suits.

    I've got a nice navy blue wool suit that I've had about four years. It's starting to gleam a bit round the elbows and the trouser seat.

    The dry cleaner said he could 'retexturise' it (whatever that means) but thought it was too worn to make much difference.

    Does anyone have any old style remedies for this? I seem to recall reading in a wartime 'make do and mend' book that you could do it with light sandpapering, but I'd be worried I'd end up with my bum showing through!
    Originally posted by Austin Allegro
    Hi there, well strangely enough I did read my "household remedy book " a little while back for exactly the same issue - Shiny wear marks on my trousers - the remedy - and by the way it works wonders.....

    Make up a very weak solution of coffee ( black ) very weak... and spray onto the trousers/suit and press in the normal way with a damp tea towel over - press / Iron the jacket inside out the suit will look like new ( obviously only if it is a dark colour ( ie : black or navy ). Pressupper trousers inside out to get ride of the creases at the "groan" area - then turn out normally spray lightly with the coffee solution and Press with a damp cloth.... Dont rub iron too hard. Just a light pressing....hope this works... oh and I was supprised it does not make your suit smell of coffee - more like dry cleaning ? how I dont know .. but worked for me.
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