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  • FIRST POST
    • queen of string
    • By queen of string 19th Jun 08, 10:40 PM
    • 506Posts
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    queen of string
    Buying a woodland for old style reasons
    • #1
    • 19th Jun 08, 10:40 PM
    Buying a woodland for old style reasons 19th Jun 08 at 10:40 PM
    I have recently been thinking about buying a piece of woodland for old style reasons. I was wondering what other posters thoughts were and if anyone had done this?

    I hope that by doing this I could future proof my family fuel wise, by managing the woodland.

    It may also provide foraged foods if these plants were encouraged.

    I would like to try and build a semi permanent shelter and camp there over the summer, living as simpy as possible.

    These are just my initial thoughts. Wanted to throw it out there and see what came back.

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    Last edited by Former MSE Wendy; 24-06-2008 at 7:04 PM.
    Eat food, not edible food-like items. Mostly plants.
Page 1
  • doddsy
    • #2
    • 19th Jun 08, 11:05 PM
    • #2
    • 19th Jun 08, 11:05 PM
    Would love to do this if only I could afford it! I would pollard willow and hazel, make baskets and provide firewood. It would also be a good place to keep a pig or two!

    I wonder what planning rules are like in your area? Would you need pp for a 'residence' even if it is temporary?

    This perfect piece of woodland would of course be mixed deciduous and have a good stream running through it!

    Good Luck!
    We must not, in trying to think about how we can make a big difference, ignore the small daily differences we can make which, over time, add up to big differences that we often cannot foresee.
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    • EssexHebridean
    • By EssexHebridean 19th Jun 08, 11:12 PM
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    EssexHebridean
    • #3
    • 19th Jun 08, 11:12 PM
    • #3
    • 19th Jun 08, 11:12 PM
    Check carefully regarding the possibilities of living there - some of the Woodlands available for sale you can pretty much do no more than pitch a tent there, which would not be practical for the kind of longer stays you;re considering.
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  • ceridwen
    • #4
    • 20th Jun 08, 7:16 AM
    • #4
    • 20th Jun 08, 7:16 AM
    I'd love to do this myself - I see the point re futureproofing (being a great fan of that concept) and the thought of having somewhere I could forage for food, get a breath of fresh air and having a bit of land I KNEW couldnt be developed (bar compulsory purchase "over my dead body") would be good. I do get very fed-up/worried at all the development going on in my area and it would be good to know I would have some chance of protecting one little bit and having it as a "refuge" would be good.

    In my area land/housing is so expensive that even the teensiest, scrapiest little bit of land alone is way over my price level unfortunately - so I just have to dream on and hope to goodness they dont develop much more of it.

    So if I personally had the chance then I would go for it - both for my own personal sake (as "refuge" territory) and because I would know at least one little bit of land was under good stewardship (ie mine) and being held safely "in trust" for future generations to retain some natural landscape.
    • hex2
    • By hex2 20th Jun 08, 8:11 AM
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    hex2
    • #5
    • 20th Jun 08, 8:11 AM
    • #5
    • 20th Jun 08, 8:11 AM
    There is a useful website here: http://www.woodlands.co.uk/owning-a-wood/

    Some good information although obviously they would like to sell you some woodland as well.

    We would love to do it but nothing seems to come up locally.
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need' Marcus Tullius Cicero
    • Mips
    • By Mips 20th Jun 08, 8:15 AM
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    Mips
    • #6
    • 20th Jun 08, 8:15 AM
    • #6
    • 20th Jun 08, 8:15 AM
    It sounds like a nice idea Queen of String.

    I'm also on the Wirral - I live opposite the Woods and we love going in there, but having your own would be great
  • Lillibet
    • #7
    • 20th Jun 08, 8:24 AM
    • #7
    • 20th Jun 08, 8:24 AM
    I believe most of suitable plots that match your needs are called "nature reserves" .

    But seriously, I am married to a countryside ranger & we have both read your post with interest. Unfortuantely, at least in the south of England, there are very very few plots available which would match your requirements, even less which would have the other necessities such as running water or acreage to provide privacy & those which are available run at +£40K (you haven't indicated your budget but this obviously wouldn't be cost effective) and come with a long list of restrictions, including a professional woodland management plan (usually only to be carried out professionally & on an on-going basis, this costs ££££ PA) . And speaking from my husbands experience of managing such sites, most councils are much more aware of your idea & will not grant any planning permissions on the woodland, including diverting or damming of waterways, building planning permission, installation of sewage facilities etc etc. At very best you might be able to get away with a Yurt or wood cabin with no power or piped water supply & a port-a-loo.

    Good luck if you decide to go ahed, I think it is a fab idea but sadly near impossible but don't let this deter you
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  • ceridwen
    • #8
    • 20th Jun 08, 8:38 AM
    • #8
    • 20th Jun 08, 8:38 AM
    I had a follow-up thought on this - I am making the automatic presumption that the land would still be accessible to the general public for leisure/recreation purposes? I have automatically assumed that - as I would do that myself if I bought such a piece of land - so that no-one was deprived of recreational space. But I'm sure you would have already thought of that and it would still be available for other people to go for walks in etc (just not anything intrusive like destructive-type activities) - and its just me worrying unduly (one gets so used to seeing the "other" type of thinking in this Society! lol)
    Last edited by ceridwen; 20-06-2008 at 8:40 AM.
    • queen of string
    • By queen of string 20th Jun 08, 9:33 AM
    • 506 Posts
    • 3,879 Thanks
    queen of string
    • #9
    • 20th Jun 08, 9:33 AM
    • #9
    • 20th Jun 08, 9:33 AM
    I was presuming ceridwen, that anything usable would almost certainly contain a footpath or two, whihc you have to honour. I have been on that woodland site before they have some lovely stuff but very expensive. I was thinking a yurt or something like that and a compost toilet ( no chemicals). Everyone I have talked to about this ( friends and family), has said Ooh, can we come and do xxxxx. They all have ideas for using the space. I know it would be a major investment, but I am increasingly thinking that to have a space to retreat would be invaluable. I'm also studying NLP and Clean Language and the opportunity to run some of those types of things informally in a space like that would be magical. I think I might have to become member No1 in the saving up to buy a wood club :-D. thanks for all your thoughts.
    Eat food, not edible food-like items. Mostly plants.
  • Plum Pie
    I heard a programme on radio 4 earlier this year about people who want to live off the grid permanently and many of them said that the main hindrance was UK planning regulations!
    • hedgewytch13
    • By hedgewytch13 20th Jun 08, 11:27 AM
    • 101 Posts
    • 592 Thanks
    hedgewytch13
    My dad bought a piece of woodland years ago for hunting purposes. He never did use it though, however he stills owns it. Unfortunately it did come with all sorts of restrictions. He couldn't even get council permission to put in a small picnic area.
    • queen of string
    • By queen of string 20th Jun 08, 11:34 AM
    • 506 Posts
    • 3,879 Thanks
    queen of string
    It's not in the northwest and for sale cheap by any chance hedgewytch13? :-D
    Eat food, not edible food-like items. Mostly plants.
  • champys
    I am reading all this with interest. Where we live (Ardennes, Northern France), quite a few people in our village and around have a patch of woodland, mostly for fuel. Also the council gives out sort of 'logging rights' each year, which is not really for cutting down trees, but more for clearing out patches of council-owned forest, so fallen branches, small trees that are in the way etc. as I understand it. Still it's free firewood, most people here burn wood and so do we. Buying a piece of woodland is not unaffordable here.
    In practice though, we have not yet even taken up some of these logging concessions, let alone taken steps to buy some forest - maintaining woodland is quite a lot of work, and so is getting your own wood out, and unless I can retire very shortly, I don't see it getting done any time soon. OH is currently struggling with re-fencing our perimeter so we can get some sheep, needs to build accommodation for planned poultry, there is a greenhouse in a kit that still hasn't been put up and meanwhile we are spending loads of time growing veg and digging new veg plot area.
    In winter, OH spends a lot of time cutting the firewood into bite-sized chunks to feed our stoves – it gets delivered in 1-metre lengths and our (american) woodburner takes half a yard max. All I am trying to say is, that it sounds super to have a piece of your own woodland, but don’t underestimate the time and energy to run it and to get the wood out – after which you still have the usual work to cut it to size. You will almost certainly have to use a chainsaw. Which takes either petrol or electricity, so still not quite eco-perfect!
    Plus, if you are into (partial) self-sufficiency, you already have a lot of other work to do…….
  • ceridwen
    Having a bit of woodland of one's own is definitely a dream many of us have (including me) - but there are many practical problems to that this is true. Champys has enlightened us to some of them. It is a quandary.

    I know I still repeat to myself a phrase Charis came out with the other day (cant recall if it was on the Board or a P.M. to me) about "We cant all take off and get 5 acres of land" or words to that effect and that fact represents a problem...as it is very true. It is a very primeval urge - to have a reasonable size bit of land that is one's own...a haven/retreat/bit of self-sufficiency. I dont know the answer to this myself....with this tiny overcrowded country that we live in where even a teensy/scrappy bit of land costs a lot on the one hand and/or could be needed by people generally for recreational purposes on the other hand. It is one of the problems that has been created by overpopulation.

    There arent easy answers to this quandary and the second I start trying to think round "how?" I tend to get very hot under the collar about overpopulation, so its by and large a subject I "close the blinds on" as I find it so difficult. I can say this as my personal dream would be to have a country estate and large woodland nearby just for me....but it takes me 5 seconds flat before I remind myself that thats thoroughly unrealistic for me to even hope for that in 21st century Britain....hence I do spend time thinking round just how a 21st century British person CAN achieve as much access as possible to "Nature" (ie some of the themes I throw into the "mix" on my blog).

    This does concern me a lot....as I feel free access to "Nature" is essential to the human spirit - it has such a rejuvenating effect.

    I think it is useful for us to have a debate as to just how to achieve this in the - overpopulated - circumstances we find ourselves in.
    • Penelope Penguin
    • By Penelope Penguin 20th Jun 08, 7:59 PM
    • 17,087 Posts
    • 132,754 Thanks
    Penelope Penguin
    Fascinating thread We'd love to own some woodland, as it'll be the best place to rear some pigs

    I know I still repeat to myself a phrase Charis came out with the other day (cant recall if it was on the Board or a P.M. to me) about "We cant all take off and get 5 acres of land"
    Originally posted by ceridwen
    AFAIK, the area of the UK is about 60 million acres. With a population of about 60 million, this is an acre per person So my family of 4 can have 4 acres. Can this be in North Yorks, please

    Penny. x
    Sheep, pigs, hens and bees on our Teesdale smallholding
  • mary43
    Much as I'd love my own woodland like the one at the bottom of my grans garden for me and where I live I know I cant.But trees I have several. Nothing really enormous but big enough for me to look out the kitchen window and see a mass of greenery, all different shades.
    Unfortunate topic on the radio at lunchtime though..........suggestion was made that householders with trees should have them inspected every three years by a 'qualified' person to make sure they're safe and in between the householders should inspect them themselves ! This supposed idea may never come into being - I hope not as I dread the thought of what it would cost - and I'm sure most of the tree owners in the country have the common sense to look after what they've got..........least I hope so.
    Mary

    I'm creative -you can't expect me to be neat too !
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  • ceridwen
    Fascinating thread We'd love to own some woodland, as it'll be the best place to rear some pigs



    AFAIK, the area of the UK is about 60 million acres. With a population of about 60 million, this is an acre per person So my family of 4 can have 4 acres. Can this be in North Yorks, please

    Penny. x
    Originally posted by Penelope Penguin
    With you on that one Penny - but there is just one teensy snag (go on - you knew I'd find one ). That 60 million is the "official" population total - okay, your starter for 5 - anyone care to hazard a guess what the "real" population of Britain is if one counts in all the "unofficial" element as well?
  • 2cats1kid
    Easy! Anyone unofficial is not entitled to their acre. Or is that not PC?
  • ceridwen
    PC or not PC - that is the question..Whether 'tis nobler...etc.

    Possibly not...but it sounds like the other "P" word...ie pragmatic. Okay...I'll join the queue for my 1 acre. Now if the guy who gave us the Square Foot Gardening concept reckons 1 person can provide pretty much their veggie needs in 4 square feet - think how much one could do with 1 acre (even allowing for taking out enough space for a house).?
  • mrs pepperpot
    i just found 6 acres of woodland near humber bridge with full acess rights and a river for 4k........... i think mr peperpots going to max out his card today lol
    " I'm just a simple janitor, who can control people with my mind"
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