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  • FIRST POST
    • gemmaj
    • By gemmaj 14th Jun 08, 8:59 PM
    • 429Posts
    • 344Thanks
    gemmaj
    tasty refried beans?
    • #1
    • 14th Jun 08, 8:59 PM
    tasty refried beans? 14th Jun 08 at 8:59 PM
    My name is Gemma and I am addicted to refried beans... well, I would be if they weren't over £1 a tin which makes them a rare treat!!

    So I came across a link to a refried bean recipe from a post on this site, and I have cooked a h_u_g_e batch of pinto beans and tried a quater of them with this recipe, but its just no where near the same taste. Can anyone recommend any other recipes?

    The one I tried was on the Hillbilly website and was cooked pinto beans, reheated and mashed with bacon fat. I don't mind the thickness but the taste is just totally different!

    edit: ooh, should have said, last time I bought a tin I read the ingrediants; pinto beans, onion powder, water and I think sunflower oil? (It was a while ago). So how do they get it so tasty???!
Page 1
    • Penelope Penguin
    • By Penelope Penguin 14th Jun 08, 9:08 PM
    • 17,087 Posts
    • 132,754 Thanks
    Penelope Penguin
    • #2
    • 14th Jun 08, 9:08 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Jun 08, 9:08 PM
    purpleivy posted a recipe here.

    Enjoy Penny. x
    Sheep, pigs, hens and bees on our Teesdale smallholding
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 14th Jun 08, 9:54 PM
    • 66,497 Posts
    • 390,755 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    • #3
    • 14th Jun 08, 9:54 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Jun 08, 9:54 PM
    You'll have to try different sources for the beans I'd imagine.
    Like anything else, one brand isn't the same as another. It could be a quality issue, or perhaps a country/region issue where they're grown.

    Apples are apples, but a Golden Delicious is nothing like a Cox' Pippin.
    • Swan
    • By Swan 14th Jun 08, 10:13 PM
    • 6,633 Posts
    • 7,400 Thanks
    Swan
    • #4
    • 14th Jun 08, 10:13 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Jun 08, 10:13 PM
    you definitely do need Pintos for proper refried beans, no other beans have the right taste & texture

    I've got a recipe somewhere, involving Pintos, onions cooked two ways, oil/fat & seasoning ... I'll dig it out & post it if no-one else comes up with anything like it first
    • purpleivy
    • By purpleivy 14th Jun 08, 10:21 PM
    • 3,411 Posts
    • 20,808 Thanks
    purpleivy
    • #5
    • 14th Jun 08, 10:21 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Jun 08, 10:21 PM
    Well, I hate the ones from a can! THe key to all cooking with beans is seasoning, seasoning and more seasoning, because they are very very bland on their own. THe recipe I used was adapted from a Rose Eliott recipe. I always cook my own beans as well. I do a whole bag at a time and then freeze in portions.
    "Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad"
    Trying not to waste food!
  • Fivenations
    • #6
    • 15th Jun 08, 9:09 AM
    • #6
    • 15th Jun 08, 9:09 AM
    Beans labelled as PInto beans can be quite expensive as well as hard to find but I buy Rose cocoa beans from my local Indian supermarket. Natco sell them. They are very similar in taste and worth a try.

    Also it may be worth searching for copycat recipes of the brand you buy, plus try looking for recipes by Rick Bayless.
    • gemmaj
    • By gemmaj 15th Jun 08, 8:52 PM
    • 429 Posts
    • 344 Thanks
    gemmaj
    • #7
    • 15th Jun 08, 8:52 PM
    • #7
    • 15th Jun 08, 8:52 PM
    Thanks, shall give it another bash!
  • pamaris
    • #8
    • 15th Jun 08, 9:28 PM
    Basic bean recipe from a Texan
    • #8
    • 15th Jun 08, 9:28 PM
    Rosecoco are interchangeable with pinto beans. Also, if you see borlotti beans they're the same. I'm from Texas, and we eat lots of pinto beans- boiled & refried. Seasoning and salt is the key, and long slow cooking. I always start with dried beans- never tinned.

    I always cook beans with a ham hock or generous amounts of high quality bacon (6 slices, cut up- which I pre-cook in the pan at the beginning of the process- with onions & garlic). I often use chicken or pork stock cubes. I season with cumin, chili & paprika (start with 1/2 teaspoon of each, then adjust). I start it out with sauteed onion & garlic (& bacon if using), then add the (pre-soaked) beans. Sometimes at the end I add a squeeze of lemon juice. Last time, I added butter and they were quite more-ish. If my kids would let me I'd add jalepeno or similar peppers, but instead I just add a few splashes of tobasco to my own bowl. Half the time I also add a tin of tomatoes. Oh and I love to add coriander if I have it lying around.

    The end result varies according to what I have on hand, but the core ingredients are the garlic, onion, bacon/ ham, SALT (or stock cubes- I think I used 3 last time), & chili powder/ cumin/ paprika.

    These beans are very versatile- on their own with cornbread (another thing I miss from Texas), or over rice, or in tortillas for burritos, or as an extender for chili. It is the basic recipe for burracho beans, which are the beans that Mexicans 're-fry' to make refried beans. For refried beans, pulverise half of the beans & mix.

    Beans are also better the next day, as the flavours absorb overnight. I always make the whole bag and freeze individual portions.

    If you ever find black beans anywhere- they lend well to the same recipes as pinto beans.

    I wish I could post an actual recipe but it's one of those things that is so easy that once you get the basics right you don't need one. Now, I really want some beans!
    • Kavanne
    • By Kavanne 11th Nov 09, 6:10 PM
    • 5,014 Posts
    • 2,551 Thanks
    Kavanne
    • #9
    • 11th Nov 09, 6:10 PM
    Recipe I can use Refried Beans in
    • #9
    • 11th Nov 09, 6:10 PM
    I have a tin of refried beans. The tin suggests I can have them with fajitas or nachos but I'd like to do something a bit more interesting. Anyone have any good recipes?

    Thanks of course will go to anyone who can help!
    Kavanne
    Nuns! Nuns! Reverse!

    'I do my job, do you do yours?'

    • CCP
    • By CCP 11th Nov 09, 6:42 PM
    • 4,601 Posts
    • 93,309 Thanks
    CCP
    I love refried beans in veggie burritos - a couple of spoonfuls wrapped up in tortillas/wraps with some veggies stir-fried with a bit of cajun spice mix, then put in a baking dish and topped with spicy tomato sauce and some grated cheese, and baked until all golden and bubbly.

    It also makes a surprisingly nice sandwich filling, with salad and a bit of mayo - it's rather like bean pate, after all.

    Best of all, though, imo, is to eat the stuff straight from the can with a spoon. (Only when no-one's looking, though, obviously! )
    • Kavanne
    • By Kavanne 11th Nov 09, 6:55 PM
    • 5,014 Posts
    • 2,551 Thanks
    Kavanne
    ooh veggie burrittos sounds goooooood
    Kavanne
    Nuns! Nuns! Reverse!

    'I do my job, do you do yours?'

  • funkymonkey849
    Quasidillas (sp?!) are delicious, spread refried beans on a tortilla, put on some extra toppings eg.g salsa, jalapenos, olives, avacado and then top with grated cheese. Place another tortilla on top and heat in a frying pan on both sides until golden brown and the cheese has melted everything together. Cut into wedges and serve.

    Also yummy in enchilladas

    Or top a jacket potato with refried beans and cheese

    Mmmmmmmmmm I love refried beans!! They are so expensive though, I usually make do with mashed kidney beans with some onions and spices mixed in.
    • purpleivy
    • By purpleivy 11th Nov 09, 9:20 PM
    • 3,411 Posts
    • 20,808 Thanks
    purpleivy

    Mmmmmmmmmm I love refried beans!! They are so expensive though, I usually make do with mashed kidney beans with some onions and spices mixed in.
    Originally posted by funkymonkey849
    I make my own, big batch at a time and really nice. I never could stand the canned ones personally, but HM are good and cheap. I think the recipe might be in Weezl's thread.

    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.html?p=10514859#post10514859 post 234

    These days I seem to use any old beans that I have. Pinto beans are the ones you are supposed to use, but i tried them and didn't rate them. DD lived in Mexico for 6 months this year and said they just referred to the beans not by name but by colour.

    I haven't been able to make my own tortillas for a few months as I have tennis elbow, shame!
    Last edited by purpleivy; 11-11-2009 at 9:26 PM.
    "Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad"
    Trying not to waste food!
  • meerkatgirl
    I'd go tamale pie all the way - good, stodgy winter food!

    http://www.elook.org/recipes/vegetable/45456.html
  • Fivenations
    Refried bean salad - Had it at a party and it was yum

    http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Refried-Bean-Salad/Detail.aspx
    • Pink.
    • By Pink. 3rd Mar 11, 11:23 AM
    • 17,431 Posts
    • 40,365 Thanks
    Pink.
    Hi arran m,

    This thread has some recipes that may help:

    tasty refried beans?

    I'll add your thread to that one later to keep the suggestions together.

    Pink
  • Stephen Leak
    Try this ...

    REFRIED BEANS

    These are only fried once. The name is due to a mis-translation. In Castilian Spanish and English, the prefix re- indicates that something is done more than once. However, in Mexican Spanish, the prefix re- indicates that something is done well. As this dish is Mexican, its name, frijoles refritos, is in Mexican Spanish and translates into English as “well-fried beans” and not “twice-fried beans”.

    Serves 2 - 3

    INGREDIENTS

    420g tin of baked beans
    400g tin of red kidney beans
    1 chilli pepper
    1 onion
    1 tablespoon of oil

    FRESH CHILLI PEPPER WARNING!

    When you chop up fresh chilli peppers be careful and avoid getting juice on your hands. If you touch your eyes, mouth or other ‘sensitive areas’, even an hour after chopping them, they will smart and burn. So wash your hands or wear rubber gloves.

    METHOD

    Open the tins of beans and drain off the water. Cut the top off the chilli pepper, cut it in half and scrape out the seeds, then chop it into pieces. Peel the onion and chop it into pieces.

    Put the beans into a bowl. Add the chilli. Mix thoroughly.

    If you have a food processor, put the beans and chilli in it and blend them to the desired consistency. If you have a hand blender, put the beans and chilli into a bowl and blend them to the desired consistency. If you don’t have a food processor or hand blender, put the beans and chilli into a bowl and use a potato masher or fork to mash them to the desired consistency. The desired consistency is like porridge or double cream. If required, add a little bit of water.

    Put the oil into a frying pan on a medium heat. Add the onion. Fry the onion for about 5 minutes until it is soft. Stir frequently to stop them sticking.

    Add the beans and chilli. Mix thoroughly. Fry for about 5 minutes. Stir frequently to stop it sticking.

    ADDITIONS & ALTERNATIVES

    Use dried beans, but these will need to be soaked and boiled first.

    Use other beans, especially pinto beans, which are the authentic Mexican cowboy bean.

    If you can’t find just one chilli pepper, use 1 teaspoon of chilli powder.

    Add 2 rashers of bacon, chopped into 1cm ( inch) pieces, or 50g of chorizo, sliced, at the same time as the onions.

    Add 1 teaspoon of ground cumin. Cumin comes from Asia, but the Spanish brought it with them to the New World, where it is now widely used in Tex-Mex cuisine.

    Add 2 teaspoons of parsley, which is reputed to reduce the wind generating capacity of beans.

    TIPS

    Let it cool and reheat it, as the flavour of chilli improves with reheating.
    Last edited by Stephen Leak; 04-03-2011 at 11:37 AM.
  • CFC
    I think there are a LOT of different recipes, probably like our cottage pie or cornish pasties! The Texan friend who taught me how to make chili and cornbread also taught me to make refried beans (like Stephen's, actually only cooked once) with lard.
  • Stephen Leak
    FYI, the combination of beans and corn contains the same amino acids as meat.
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