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  • FIRST POST
    • MSE Martin
    • By MSE Martin 26th Mar 08, 11:38 AM
    • 8,111Posts
    • 42,248Thanks
    MSE Martin
    Great Rural MoneySaving Hunt
    • #1
    • 26th Mar 08, 11:38 AM
    Great Rural MoneySaving Hunt 26th Mar 08 at 11:38 AM
    What's it about?

    While living in the countryside obviously has its benefits when it comes to MoneySaving the downsides can be prohibitive just as much as city living but for a whole new set of reasons.

    What to do?

    Whether you don't have central heating so have to make alternative arrangements or have to pay more for extra channels because you can't get Freeview, if you live out in the sticks and have some useful MoneySaving hints and tips for others in the same situation or even those contemplating moving to the country then click reply to add yours.

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    Last edited by Former MSE Wendy; 01-04-2008 at 6:32 PM.
    Martin Lewis, Money Saving Expert.
    Please note, answers don't constitute financial advice, it is based on generalised journalistic research. Always ensure any decision is made with regards to your own individual circumstance.

    Don't miss out on urgent MoneySaving, get my weekly e-mail at www.moneysavingexpert.com/tips.

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Page 1
    • carebabe
    • By carebabe 2nd Apr 08, 12:12 AM
    • 211 Posts
    • 638 Thanks
    carebabe
    • #2
    • 2nd Apr 08, 12:12 AM
    save on travel costs
    • #2
    • 2nd Apr 08, 12:12 AM
    i purchased a 10 journey bus ticket (cost 10) and have been using this to travel to town (30 mile round trip) for work and shopping. saves on parking costs and is greener. sold my car 6 weeks ago and borrow my partners car once a week. decided we didnt really need 2 cars anymore. although i work full time its 3 journeys per week (12hr shifts).
    Teamwork means.......never having to take all the blame yourself
    • kingkano
    • By kingkano 2nd Apr 08, 7:22 AM
    • 1,920 Posts
    • 844 Thanks
    kingkano
    • #3
    • 2nd Apr 08, 7:22 AM
    • #3
    • 2nd Apr 08, 7:22 AM
    Find your local farm shop/farmer and get a freezer You can then order whole lambs, whole pigs and maybe even half a cow. Butchered however you want it, at certain times of the year. The price is excellent, you know where its from and its fresh. You then freeze it and use as you want. (we get a lamb every 6 mths and half a pig about the same).

    A farm shop is superb for vegetables (or a farmers market if its a bit less rural than that). Although do check if yours just gets the stuff in from the big markets - which is not quite as good to my mind.
    • miss_phish
    • By miss_phish 2nd Apr 08, 7:23 AM
    • 585 Posts
    • 23,307 Thanks
    miss_phish
    • #4
    • 2nd Apr 08, 7:23 AM
    • #4
    • 2nd Apr 08, 7:23 AM
    Using a barter system with neighbours works well and also keeps you in touch with the community.
    We grow chickens and our neighbour lambs and we then swop meat. Another friend produces honey and we swop with eggs. Yet another one grows tonnes of fabulous veg and he will swop with just about anything (preferably red wine though!!!)
    You end up with the best, freshest, local produce possible even though you only grow/produce one thing.

    PS services can be just as important as produce when you live out in the wilds - sewing, typing, bookeeping etc are all on demand and easily bartered.
    Piggypoints - 207+10 * Quidco - 95 * Tesco - 1095 * Sainsbugs - 4237
    I SHALL be debt free!!!!!
    • Jolaaled
    • By Jolaaled 2nd Apr 08, 7:42 AM
    • 1,038 Posts
    • 2,504 Thanks
    Jolaaled
    • #5
    • 2nd Apr 08, 7:42 AM
    • #5
    • 2nd Apr 08, 7:42 AM
    the farm shops round here all seem very expensive, compared to tesco in the nearest town, although the quality looks great.

    I have found, though, that i can save a lot on free range eggs by buying from the roadside farm gate..there's usually some sort of hand-painted sign saying that they have eggs for sale. I'm lucky that i can pick them up when travelling to and from work.

    Round here, they're about 1.50 per dozen, compared to tesco's 1.35 for half dozen.

    And they're lovely quality too.
    • RDA
    • By RDA 2nd Apr 08, 8:16 AM
    • 205 Posts
    • 167 Thanks
    RDA
    • #6
    • 2nd Apr 08, 8:16 AM
    Heating Oil
    • #6
    • 2nd Apr 08, 8:16 AM
    Many rural homeowners will use oil to heat their houses rather than gas due as it's often not available in outlying areas.

    I organise a consortium which places a single large order with the most competitive oil supplier and we receive a bulk discount in return.

    In our case, a 3% discount allowed us to split a saving of 150 between 5 neighbours.

    This may not seem much, but later this year we plan to place a larger order and have been offered an even higher discount for a tanker load.
    • Heinz
    • By Heinz 2nd Apr 08, 8:59 AM
    • 11,038 Posts
    • 4,449 Thanks
    Heinz
    • #7
    • 2nd Apr 08, 8:59 AM
    • #7
    • 2nd Apr 08, 8:59 AM
    Many rural homeowners will use oil to heat their houses rather than gas due as it's often not available in outlying areas.

    I organise a consortium which places a single large order with the most competitive oil supplier and we receive a bulk discount in return.

    In our case, a 3% discount allowed us to split a saving of 150 between 5 neighbours.

    This may not seem much, but later this year we plan to place a larger order and have been offered an even higher discount for a tanker load.
    Originally posted by RDA
    And if you're a believer in the 'humans are the cause of global warming' line, think of the environmental savings on one tanker delivery instead of five!
    Time has moved on (much quicker than it used to - or so it seems at my age) and my previous advice on residential telephony has been or is now gradually being overtaken by changes in the retail market. Hence, I have now deleted links to my previous 'pearls of wisdom'. I sincerely hope they helped save some of you money.
    • kingkano
    • By kingkano 2nd Apr 08, 9:35 AM
    • 1,920 Posts
    • 844 Thanks
    kingkano
    • #8
    • 2nd Apr 08, 9:35 AM
    • #8
    • 2nd Apr 08, 9:35 AM
    the farm shops round here all seem very expensive, compared to tesco in the nearest town, although the quality looks great.

    I have found, though, that i can save a lot on free range eggs by buying from the roadside farm gate..there's usually some sort of hand-painted sign saying that they have eggs for sale. I'm lucky that i can pick them up when travelling to and from work.

    Round here, they're about 1.50 per dozen, compared to tesco's 1.35 for half dozen.

    And they're lovely quality too.
    Originally posted by Jolaaled
    That can be a problem. Sometimes they can be more shop than farm . My local one is good for prices, and their own grown stuff is great. But they subsidise it with market bought stuff sadly, which is lesser quality and I don't like the food miles. Happily they will tell me exactly what is local and what isnt without taking offence
    • bawbeesaver
    • By bawbeesaver 2nd Apr 08, 10:14 AM
    • 8 Posts
    • 13 Thanks
    bawbeesaver
    • #9
    • 2nd Apr 08, 10:14 AM
    Alternative Fuel
    • #9
    • 2nd Apr 08, 10:14 AM
    Many rural homeowners will use oil to heat their houses rather than gas due as it's often not available in outlying areas.

    I organise a consortium which places a single large order with the most competitive oil supplier and we receive a bulk discount in return.

    In our case, a 3% discount allowed us to split a saving of 150 between 5 neighbours.

    This may not seem much, but later this year we plan to place a larger order and have been offered an even higher discount for a tanker load.
    Originally posted by RDA

    This is a great tip. I too shop around for the best oil price but I have started to burn logs in our fireplaces and a log burner to provide background heat as an alternative to burning oil. I have worked out that burning wood is cheaper than oil - especially now that the oil price has risen so much.

    It is also greener as wood is a renewable source. I collect fallen twigs from the garden after every storm and keep all prunings as kindling. Any branches that I remove from the older trees I saw up into the right size - good exercise. For a small fee I can have a day of wood collection on the Forestry Commission land - collecting the side branches that they trim off. (Borrow a trailer and chain saw) It is also easy and comparatively cheap to have logs delivered from some of the local farmers. The wood ash can also be used as a soil improver.
    • MoJo
    • By MoJo 2nd Apr 08, 10:38 AM
    • 538 Posts
    • 866 Thanks
    MoJo
    Using a barter system with neighbours works well and also keeps you in touch with the community.
    We grow chickens and our neighbour lambs and we then swop meat. Another friend produces honey and we swop with eggs. Yet another one grows tonnes of fabulous veg and he will swop with just about anything (preferably red wine though!!!)
    You end up with the best, freshest, local produce possible even though you only grow/produce one thing.

    PS services can be just as important as produce when you live out in the wilds - sewing, typing, bookeeping etc are all on demand and easily bartered.
    Originally posted by miss_phish
    PPS and the people can be vital - networking was alive and thriving in rural areas well before the business world & t'internet picked up on it
    There's always someone who can either help or who knows a man who can.
    • MoJo
    • By MoJo 2nd Apr 08, 10:40 AM
    • 538 Posts
    • 866 Thanks
    MoJo
    <snip> For a small fee I can have a day of wood collection on the Forestry Commission land - collecting the side branches that they trim off. (Borrow a trailer and chain saw) It is also easy and comparatively cheap to have logs delivered from some of the local farmers. The wood ash can also be used as a soil improver.
    Originally posted by bawbeesaver
    I've been wondering how to find out about this with the Forestry Commission - any pointers?
    • Frugaldom
    • By Frugaldom 2nd Apr 08, 11:00 AM
    • 6,039 Posts
    • 52,808 Thanks
    Frugaldom
    I like the bartering idea, but it's a bit confusing trying to factor them into the accounts when calculating the hard cash side of things. (I'm not talking a dozen eggs for a bag of potatoes, I'm talking business transactions - I'll fix your car if you'll top my paddock type thing.)

    I was going to compile a list of things that rural life doesn't provide have but decided it's far easier to say that urban cannot be compared with rural. If you are planning on moving to the country, remember that there is no hurry once you get there. If you can't live a slow pace without takeaways, shopping and nightlife, you will hate it. If you expect digital signals, mains gas, mains sewage and online supermarket shopping, forget it.

    Country roads for drivers - you ALWAYS need to have an idea of what's around the next bend and it is CRUCIAL that you know milking times, as herds are often walked from field to farm and the regular mode of farm transport is a tractor or a quad bike with a collie dog sat at the back. Once you get going, there are still the milk tankers and logging lorries. And worst of all, if there are youngsters with cars, open roads are race tracks. I prefer not to own a car (because I don't own a paddock?)

    PS: I have never lived in or near the city, but I don't live out in the sticks at the moment either. We are very civilised here - we have mains sewage, a post office/newsagent, a part time bank and a Co-op.

    Back to correct this old post - We are now back in the sticks, single track road, no buses, no street lighting, wheelie bin 1.2miles away from the house, no mains sewage, private water supply, no shops, an open fire, no gas or oil and still no paddock!
    Last edited by Frugaldom; 19-01-2009 at 1:07 PM. Reason: Updating
    I reserve the right NOT to spend:
    The less I spend, the more I can afford!
    Now running Frugaldom as a lifestyle social enterprise!
    • Frugaldom
    • By Frugaldom 2nd Apr 08, 11:09 AM
    • 6,039 Posts
    • 52,808 Thanks
    Frugaldom
    Training days
    I've been wondering how to find out about this with the Forestry Commission - any pointers?
    Originally posted by MoJo
    Find out all you need to know here. The Forestry Commission also offers training seminars for chainsaw use, as you need a licence to operate one on forestry land. Hope this helps
    I reserve the right NOT to spend:
    The less I spend, the more I can afford!
    Now running Frugaldom as a lifestyle social enterprise!
    • MoJo
    • By MoJo 2nd Apr 08, 11:18 AM
    • 538 Posts
    • 866 Thanks
    MoJo
    Ta. I've bounced around their site before but not found what I was looking for. Have to allocate some spare time to investigate it further.
  • V Chic Chick
    I don't have a dog, but I have noticed that the local feed merchants sell dog & cat food. I would imagine that this is a lot cheaper than city pet shops, but they all come in 20kg bags from the look of things. I do, however, buy my chicken food there (which has gone up from £6.50/20kg to £7.53/20kg in the space of 6 weeks!!!) which is a lot cheaper than the pet shop in town.

    Sawmills will often sell dust extracted wood shavings by the shrink-wrapped bale. These are really cheap (~£6 each) and they last me over a year with my 2 chickens in a coop which is ~1m square. I've seen the pet shop get exactly the same stuff delivered, and they then divide it up and sell it on for about 20x that price!!!
  • hawks
    I use a wesite called www.boilerjuice.com for buying oil that seems to get better prices (bulk ordering I guess) and also groups orders together by postcode to save money. So if you don't have enough neighbours to form a consortium this site sort of does it for you.

    This is my first post so if I should not have mentioned the website sorry!
    • Seakay
    • By Seakay 2nd Apr 08, 1:05 PM
    • 4,164 Posts
    • 10,040 Thanks
    Seakay
    I use a wesite called www.boilerjuice.com for buying oil that seems to get better prices (bulk ordering I guess) and also groups orders together by postcode to save money. So if you don't have enough neighbours to form a consortium this site sort of does it for you.

    This is my first post so if I should not have mentioned the website sorry!
    Originally posted by hawks
    Hello hawks! This site is all about sharing information, so mentioning the website is fine!
  • Steel
    Ditto what many others have said on here already.

    Local farms are a great source of good quality food. Our local egg farm charges 1.60 for a dozen MASSIVE eggs, many of them double yolkers during the first few months of the laying year. I don't think I could beat that by keeping my own. We have a farm that offers a veggie box scheme no more than a mile from our house.

    We chop up wood from felled or storm-damaged trees during the year for our fire during the winter and a local gardener occassionally drops large tree prunings off to us as well. It all gets stocked in a big coal bunker (which we were given by my father, a previous 'city dweller' who found the reality of having an open fire in the country didn't match the dream and quickly got a gas fire fitted instead ).The wood ash goes on the garden.

    There's a lot of produce changing hands over back garden fences, the odd brace of pheasant and rabbit hanging up in garages, and bartering of jobs (with me I'll do hanging baskets and large cakes for lawn mowing).

    By the way, all those who buy meat direct from farmers, how much are you paying for lambs, pigs and cows? I've recently been offerred half a young lamb for 35 and I've no idea what the going rate is?
    "carpe that diem"
    • kingkano
    • By kingkano 2nd Apr 08, 1:39 PM
    • 1,920 Posts
    • 844 Thanks
    kingkano
    By the way, all those who buy meat direct from farmers, how much are you paying for lambs, pigs and cows? I've recently been offerred half a young lamb for 35 and I've no idea what the going rate is?
    Originally posted by Steel
    That's about right. I get a whole one for 65 on average. (think my half in autumn was 40). It usually is priced per kg and depends on the final weight - as they do vary lol.

    A pig is a much more considerable investment (much bigger) haha. You need a decent size freezer. I think the last lot were 80 for a half pig.

    I've not found local beef yet sadly
    • ViksB
    • By ViksB 2nd Apr 08, 1:43 PM
    • 326 Posts
    • 642 Thanks
    ViksB
    By the way, all those who buy meat direct from farmers, how much are you paying for lambs, pigs and cows? I've recently been offerred half a young lamb for 35 and I've no idea what the going rate is?
    Originally posted by Steel
    We sell lambs and pigs to friends, family and neighbours and last year we charged 35-40 for half a lamb and 90-100 for half a pig, however costs have risen alot especially for pigs and that price will rise this year.

    Viks
    Last edited by ViksB; 02-04-2008 at 1:45 PM.
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