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  • FIRST POST
    • MSE Martin
    • By MSE Martin 11th Mar 08, 10:39 AM
    • 8,111Posts
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    MSE Martin
    MONEY MORAL DILEMMA. Should Howard and Marion replace Richieís tenner?
    • #1
    • 11th Mar 08, 10:39 AM
    MONEY MORAL DILEMMA. Should Howard and Marion replace Richieís tenner? 11th Mar 08 at 10:39 AM
    Here's this week's hypothetical situation for you to cogitate on:

    Should Howard and Marion replace Richieís tenner?

    Howard and Marionís 11-year-old son, Richie, loses a £10 note after stuffing it into the back pocket of his jeans. Heís not actually sure whether it was lost or pick pocketed, but it wasnít there when he got home. Dad Howard thinks they should reimburse Richie, because heís only 11, and it would be cruel to deprive him of his pocket money. Yet mum Marion argues that they shouldnít replace the cash. She says itís a chance for Richie to learn an important lesson about life; sometimes bad stuff happens and no oneís going to pick up the pieces for you. Should Howard and Marion replace Richieís tenner?

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Page 1
    • travellingbum
    • By travellingbum 11th Mar 08, 10:48 AM
    • 20,762 Posts
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    travellingbum
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 08, 10:48 AM
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 08, 10:48 AM
    No way. The kid is old enough to start learning about the (unfortunate) importance of money in our lives. Let the loss of his tenner be a lesson for him to be more careful in the future. Learning the hard way is better than not learning at all. Tough luck, but that's life!
    • kyh
    • By kyh 11th Mar 08, 10:53 AM
    • 278 Posts
    • 230 Thanks
    kyh
    • #3
    • 11th Mar 08, 10:53 AM
    • #3
    • 11th Mar 08, 10:53 AM
    No to replace it they are indicating they will always bail him out - but they could offer to let him earn some more money by doing some extra jobs around the house if that is how he earns his pocket money - eg well we won't replace the £10 but you could earn £5 if you wash Dad's car.
  • meher
    • #4
    • 11th Mar 08, 10:54 AM
    • #4
    • 11th Mar 08, 10:54 AM
    Howard and Marion’s 11-year-old son, Richie, loses a £10 note after stuffing it into the back pocket of his jeans. He’s not actually sure whether it was lost or pick pocketed, but it wasn’t there when he got home. Dad Howard thinks they should reimburse Richie, because he’s only 11, and it would be cruel to deprive him of his pocket money. Yet mum Marion argues that they shouldn’t replace the cash. She says it’s a chance for Richie to learn an important lesson about life; sometimes bad stuff happens and no one’s going to pick up the pieces for you. Should Howard and Marion replace Richie’s tenner?
    Originally posted by MSE Martin
    ofcourse yes, poor thing - he is grieving for his lost precious £10 and learnt his lesson the moment he lost it and to have to bear with his mother's additional lessons is too much to ask for a 11 year old. I like to believe if you show that you trust your child, s/he'd work on living upto that expectation.
  • Scorpio_Brighton
    • #5
    • 11th Mar 08, 11:02 PM
    Careless kids
    • #5
    • 11th Mar 08, 11:02 PM
    What's an 11-year-old doing with a £10 note anyway? I've rarely got that much pocket money myself! It would hurt to empathise with his dismay on realising it had gone, though, I've been in that sort of situation myself when young. I'm a softie, so I'd probably do a King Solomon, reimburse £5 and tell him to be more careful in future; but I'm not sure that's sending the right message. Life is hard and earning money is harder. The sooner he learns to look after it, the better.
  • Dylstardelux
    • #6
    • 11th Mar 08, 11:17 PM
    Richies Tenner
    • #6
    • 11th Mar 08, 11:17 PM
    No.

    They shouldn't.

    It's immensly hard but he needs to learn to take care of his assets!
    • CrispyUK
    • By CrispyUK 12th Mar 08, 12:23 AM
    • 218 Posts
    • 89 Thanks
    CrispyUK
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 08, 12:23 AM
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 08, 12:23 AM
    Perhaps they should buy him a wallet to help him keep his money a bit safer in future, rather than stuffing it into his back pocket.
  • stogiebear
    • #8
    • 12th Mar 08, 4:28 AM
    • #8
    • 12th Mar 08, 4:28 AM
    Give him the money but make him earn it.
  • Jostick
    • #9
    • 12th Mar 08, 6:46 AM
    • #9
    • 12th Mar 08, 6:46 AM
    Richie is only saying he lost the £10. He is a budding Money Saving Making Expert!
    If Mum holds sway, hey ho, it was worth a try. If Dad coughs up; result! Richie will be able to go to either one whenever he runs a bit short! The added advantage to any siblings is that they will also receive handouts to make things "fair".
    The solutiom? Simple; fine Richie £10 for being so careless. We all have to pay for our mistakes!

    Oh what!!!?? Think about it; what sort of parent do you wish you'd had?
    • ktj
    • By ktj 12th Mar 08, 7:10 AM
    • 262 Posts
    • 47 Thanks
    ktj
    As with most things in life, it will depend on circumstances, e.g. can the parent's afford it and most importantly the nature of the boy. Is he dizzy and disorganised - in which case do not replace as he needs to be taught to be more responsible; or is he careful, sensible and sensitive - in which case yes as he's only 11 and still learning about life. Certainly after a good talking to my son would be reimbursed.
    • toadhall
    • By toadhall 12th Mar 08, 7:28 AM
    • 320 Posts
    • 72 Thanks
    toadhall
    he would have to work for it but yes I would replace it, after I bought him a wallet lol
  • Shytalker
    Yes, they should give him the tenner.

    The poor little bean has already suffered some anguish and humiliation and will have learnt something from that. Anyway, he was honest enough to tell his parents about it.

    It might have been hard for him to admit it. Of course, he might also have calculated that they would replace it out of sympathy but they should give him the benefit of the doubt.

    His honesty deserves a bit of encouragement.
  • burgers3
    No he needs to make sure he looks after his things money included life is hard he might think about it a little harder next time (it dont grow on trees my son) from my dad when i lost £1 back in the 60s and have not lost any since (apart from bad debt)
    • starkj
    • By starkj 12th Mar 08, 8:37 AM
    • 63 Posts
    • 19 Thanks
    starkj
    Spare the rod..
    Obviously the child need sorting out.

    Don't give any more money.

    Sew his pockets up.

    Put him in the cupboard under the stairs.

    Sell him to some gypsies for a tenner.

    ********************************

    or have a heart, Guv?
    • heleen
    • By heleen 12th Mar 08, 8:38 AM
    • 115 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    heleen
    I woudl refund half of it and let the missing £5 be the lesson. And make it clear this is a one off bail out.
    Depends how much he normally gets/has though. If he's been saving up for 6 months to get the tenner I would only take 1 or 2 pounds off. If he gets a tenner a week then £5 seems fair.

    Heleen
    I love it when a plan comes together
  • barstep
    He should treat his parents like a bank
    If I lost a tenner and went to my bank expecting them to reimburse me they'd die laughing.

    So Bank of Mum and Dad - be just as tough.
    Filiss
  • chivas
    IMO, the poor thing is only a poor thing as long as he as lost the money - as soon as it is replaced he becomes a spoilt brat :rolleyes:
    I know that sounds harsh, but seriously, think about the future of the child - not about keeping him happy and looking good in his eyes right now. Giving more money turns a good life lesson into an incredibly bad one.

    (Yes it's a shame - but if you lost your wallet would you go to your employee for reimbursement?? Once the money was given it was the responsibility of the keeper - and if they weren't responsible enough to look after it, then they shouldn't be given any more...)
    I heart Martin!
    • anonymousie
    • By anonymousie 12th Mar 08, 8:48 AM
    • 991 Posts
    • 715 Thanks
    anonymousie
    I have a 14yr old and 11yr old and to both of them £10 is an awful lot of money- certainly not a "back pocket" amount. It is the sort of amount that the 14yr old might rarely take to school for concert tickets etc

    They would both my mortified to have lost so much money- maybe I'm wrong, but even for the 14yr old, if they have £10 xmas/birthday spends I pop it in my purse till they need it!

    I guess I'd go for the "not replace but earn it back" school of thought, but it wouldn't happen!
    • dronid
    • By dronid 12th Mar 08, 9:11 AM
    • 581 Posts
    • 1,258 Thanks
    dronid
    If anyone here is a parent it might be interesting if you ask your kids what they would do? Who knows - it might prevent them loosing any themselves.

    I would be on the side of earning it back - after asking why it was loose in a back pocket. Gosh I'm a hard person.

    I could make it better myself at home. All I need is a small aubergine...

    Current debt £7000 - loan. And a £4000 pound overdraft. That didn't work, did it?
    • ruthcoppard
    • By ruthcoppard 12th Mar 08, 9:28 AM
    • 6 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    ruthcoppard
    Of course they shouldn't. My son took his £70 birthday money with him to town years ago when he was 13. He lost it - pinched /lost, didn't know. We didn't replace it saying it had been his responsibility to keep it safe. Ten years later, he 'happened' to mention that he had gone with his mates to play football on the way and used his coat as a goal post; he then forgot to take his coat and when he went back, found that the money had gone.
    It was Richie's responsibility to look after this money - if anything lost is easily replaced, why should he learn to be more careful?
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